Jemina Melinda Napier

Jemina Melinda Napier
Heriot-Watt University · Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies

PhD Linguistics

About

131
Publications
32,771
Reads
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1,373
Citations
Introduction
sign languages, linguistic access, interpreting and translation, linguistic and cultural diversity, linguistic and social inclusion, mediated communication, family language policy, intercultural communication, multilingualism, gender & equality in professions and leadership
Additional affiliations
February 2013 - October 2015
Heriot-Watt University
Position
  • Head of Department
Education
February 2004 - November 2006
University of Technology Sydney
Field of study
  • Professional & Higher Education
February 1998 - April 2002
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (131)
Technical Report
Full-text available
Review question / Objective: The purpose of this scoping review is to identify and evaluate available evidence concerning assessments under the Mental Health Act (1983) (MHA) (and international equivalents) which are carried out with the assistance of a spoken or signed language interpreter. 'International equivalents' refers to pieces of legislati...
Article
This paper explores the concept of “accuracy” in the context of interpreter-mediated healthcare interaction by reporting on a study of simulated doctor-patient consultations involving professional Australian Sign Language (Auslan)/English interpreters. Wadensjö’s (1998) taxonomy of renditions is used to analyse the ways interpreters convey health i...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A demographic snapshot of the profession: The 2021 Census of sign language translators & interpreters in the UK RESEARCH REPORT
Article
There is a need for culturally competent health care providers (HCPs) to provide care to deaf signers, who are members of a linguistic and cultural minority group. Many deaf signers have lower health literacy levels due to deprivation of incidental learning opportunities and inaccessibility of health-related materials, increasing their risk for poo...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of an international online survey that replicated previous surveys administered with migrant children. The previous surveys were adapted for the sign language context and distributed to heritage signers who have grown up with deaf parents. The survey sought responses to attitudinal statements about their language b...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on responsibility and cooperation as recurring themes that emerged from the narratives told by 11 teenage and adult, deaf and hearing, heritage signers in Australia, and 17 young heritage signers and 10 deaf parents in England. Data was collected through a mixed-methods study of semi-structured interviews and group interviews u...
Chapter
This chapter serves as a ‘positioning’ chapter, giving an overview of my methodological approach to the study of sign language brokering in deaf communities and a justification for why I chose a mixed-methods approach. Specifically, this chapter discusses how I approach doing ethical research with signing communities and the quantitative and qualit...
Chapter
This chapter discusses a key theme that emerged from the interview data in relation to shame. The chapter draws on data from 11 semi-structured interviews with teenage and adult, deaf and hearing, sign language brokers in Australia, and group interviews and vignette and visual methods used with 17 young hearing heritage signers and 10 deaf parents....
Chapter
This chapter provides introductory information to situate this book in three interlocking disciplines that frame the discussions of sign language brokering throughout the book: social sciences (deaf studies), language studies (applied linguistics and sociolinguistics) and translation studies (interpreting studies). First, I give an overview of the...
Chapter
This chapter draws together the findings and discussion from Chaps. 4, 5 and 6 to explore how this multi-stage study contributes to our understanding of child language brokering (CLB) in general and specifically to sign language brokering (SLB) in deaf-hearing families, as well as to our understanding of intercultural mediation generally and in sig...
Chapter
Chapter 2 frames this study of sign language brokering (SLB) by exploring the existing literature on child language brokering (CLB), drawing primarily on studies of CLB with migrant children internationally in order to situate this study of SLB in a broader context of understanding of intercultural mediation and to understand CLB as a conventional...
Article
Full-text available
Most FLP research focuses on intrafamily communication (1FLP) and how this is impacted by larger contexts. But what happens when different multilingual families interact intensively on a daily basis? This article analyses language use during a holiday in India in and between four deaf-hearing befriended families, and how this evolved over the twelv...
Article
Full-text available
This is the first study mapping the profile of International Sign (IS) conference interpreters worldwide. Rather than a language, IS is a set of variable communicative practices used by deaf persons in international settings. In addition, international institutions and organisations increasingly offer IS interpreting services in order to provide ac...
Article
Full-text available
How the police prepare for and engage with a citizen who is deaf and uses British Sign Language (BSL) is a national problem. From the perspective of deaf sign language users, the police remain largely inaccessible and unprepared in how to accommodate their linguistic needs. Four regional forces have responded to this issue by introducing a local so...
Book
This book details a study of sign language brokering that is carried out by deaf and hearing people who grow up using sign language at home with deaf parents, known as heritage signers. Child language brokering (CLB) is a form of interpreting carried out informally by children, typically for migrant families. The study of sign language brokering ha...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we posit and explore the concept of ‘the translated deaf self’, tentatively defined as: ‘the socio-cultural impact for deaf sign language users of multiple, regular, lifelong experiences of being encountered by others and inter-subjectively known in a translated form, i.e. through sign language interpreters’. Regarding translation...
Article
Full-text available
Deaf people’s lives are predicated to some extent on working with sign language interpreters. The self is translated on a regular basis and is a long-term state of being. Identity becomes known and performed through the translated self in many interactions, especially at work. (Hearing) others’ experience of deaf people, largely formed indirectly t...
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses the impact on occupational relations of mediated communication through a sign language interpreter from the perspective of hearing people who do not sign but who work alongside deaf signers in the workplace. Based on a phenomenological analysis of eight semi-structured interviews, findings address the influence of phonocentri...
Article
Full-text available
Este artigo foi publicado na revista da Associação de Intérpretes de Língua de Sinais no Reino Unido. Ele dá uma visão geral da interpretação legal, e uma questão particularmente atual para a comunidade surda, se eles devem ser autorizados a servir como jurados em tribunais penais com intérpretes. Atualmente, em muitos países, isso não é permitido....
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we present an appreciative inquiry case study of our work together in a PhD defence, which we believe demonstrates a best practice in the field of signed language interpreting. We call into question the meaning and relevance of the 'designated interpreter' model, examining whether there is a 'perfect formula' for deaf academics and in...
Article
Women remain underrepresented in senior positions within universities and report barriers to career progression. Drawing on the concepts of Foucault and Bourdieu, with an emphasis on technologies of the self, this article aims to understand mothers’ academic career experiences. Interviews were conducted with 35 non‐STEMM (science, technology, engin...
Article
Full-text available
For many deaf signers, a signed language is their first or preferred language; spoken or written languages are often second languages and literacy levels among deaf signers vary. Historically, surveys carried out with deaf signers have been in written form, which means that findings of such studies may be problematic in terms of whether participant...
Book
The field of sign language interpreting is undergoing an exponential increase in the delivery of services through remote and video technologies. The nature of these technologies challenges established notions of interpreting as a situated, communicative event and of the interpreter as a participant. As a result, new perspectives and research are ne...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter provides an overview of the emerging field of remote interpreting via video link and reviews the empirical research that has come from this sector.
Chapter
A case study of two authentic video interpreted calls that took part of the Insign project demonstrations at the European Parliament. One call used spoken English and British Sign Language (BSL), and the other used spoken English and International Sign (IS). The purpose of the demonstrations was to illustrate how deaf European citizens could call M...
Article
Legal interpreting as an applied linguistic activity has been explored in the literature, with various explorations of the role of legal interpreters from a discourse perspective. Current thinking in interpreting studies classifies the role of the interpreter as a participant in interaction and co-constructor of meaning. Sign language interpreting...
Article
Australian deaf citizens are currently not permitted to perform jury duty, primarily due to their inability to hear the evidence and deliberate without interpreters. Although interpreters are routinely employed to interpret for defendants or witnesses in court, current legal frameworks do not permit interpreters to enter the deliberation room as a...
Article
Full-text available
In the wake of a recent decision by the High Court of Australia, currently a deaf person, who relies on sign language, is not able to serve as a juror because Australian law does not permit the swearing in of an interpreter as the ‘13th person’ in the jury room. In 2016, the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities found...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on findings from an international survey of sign language interpreters who have experience of working remotely via video link, either in a video relay service or as a video remote interpreter. The objective of the study was to identify the common issues that confront interpreters when working in these remote environments and asce...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we report on interview data collected from 14 Deaf leaders across seven countries (Australia, Belgium, Ireland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States) regarding their perspectives on signed language interpreters. Using a semi-structured survey questionnaire, seven interpreting researchers interviewed two...
Article
This project investigated the capacity of deaf people using Australian Sign Language (Auslan) to serve as jurors. Following on from a pilot study with 6 deaf and 6 hearing people acting as ‘jurors’ (see Napier and Spencer 2007, 2008), this project replicated the method of the earlier study, and compared the level of comprehension of 30 deaf jurors...
Research
Full-text available
In June/July 2016, the Centre for Translation and Interpreting Studies in Scotland (CTISS) brought together over 400 researchers and practitioners from across the world to discuss Future-proofing Interpreting and Translating during the eighth Critical Link Conference (CL 8). Critical Link Conferences are the most important global forum for discussi...
Article
Full-text available
A participatory research approach is a qualitative methodology that is inductive and collaborative (Cornwall & Jewkes, 1995) and relies on trust and relationships (Christopher et al. 2008). This approach is typically used in public health research studies, and has been used specifically to investigate migrant communities and interpreters in public...
Article
Little is known about the nature of fingerspelling during sign language interpretation. In this small-scale, exploratory study, we examined the fingerspelling of interpreters working in five different sign languages: American Sign Language (ASL), Australian Sign Language (Auslan), British Sign Language (BSL), Irish Sign Language (ISL), and Italian...
Article
It has long been recognised that deaf people experience barriers to political participation and that notions of citizenship do not take into account the needs of deaf sign language users. In light of an effort at the European level to increase the potential for deaf sign language users to participate in political processes through technology, this...
Article
In considering the challenges for court interpreters, much of the previous research has concentrated on the linguistic aspects of the interpreting process. This paper explores the issue from the perspective of working conditions and professional status. One hundred and ninety-four practicing court interpreters in Australia were surveyed about their...
Book
Sign language in action is a term that we have coined to encompass how sign languages are used in everyday life. In Chapter 2, we framed the notion of sign language in action against the backdrop of the fields of Deaf Studies and applied linguistics and by introducing the concept of applied sign linguistics. In this chapter, we will discuss the con...
Chapter
The term Deaf Studies was coined in 1984 at the University of Bristol after the establishment of the Centre for Deaf Studies in 1978, and the first International Deaf Researchers Workshop was hosted at the same university in 1985 (Marschark & Humphries, 2010). Researchers interested in exploring the language, culture and lives of deaf sign language...
Chapter
At the end of each chapter, we have provided readers with a few suggestions for further reading. In this section, we list books that we would particularly recommend for anyone wishing to pursue research in the area of applied sign linguistics.
Chapter
Previous chapters have discussed sign language and identity, how sign language is learned and taught and how it is used in everyday life. Building on these previous chapters as a foundation, we now move to the exploration of sign language in practice in terms of communication and mediation. This chapter focuses primarily on the work of deaf and hea...
Chapter
Deaf people across many parts of the world recount stories of ‘surviving’ their education because of the lack of access to the curriculum via a sign language on the one hand, and on the other, because of the intense suppression of sign languages that existed for many decades in many countries. Indeed, in many places, this remains the status quo tod...
Chapter
There are many issues to consider regarding the acquisition of signed languages, including the critical issue of transmission of language. As we saw in Chapter 3, an estimated 90–95% of deaf children are born into hearing, non-signing families, and as a result, these children may have a haphazard route to sign language acquisition. In addition, an...
Chapter
In this final content chapter, we discuss the various steps involved in carrying out a research project in applied sign linguistics, focusing on the considerations needed in terms of research design and participant recruitment as well as analysis. Although the approaches utilised in applied sign linguistics research are the same as applied linguist...
Article
Full-text available
The Directive 2010/64/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 October 2010 establishes common minimum rules for European Union (EU) countries on the right to interpretation and translation in criminal proceedings as well as in proceedings for the execution of the European arrest warrant. This provision as well as the right to sign la...
Article
This book defines the notion of applied sign linguistics by drawing on data from projects that have explored sign language in action in various domains. The book gives professionals working with sign languages, signed language teachers and students, research students and their supervisors, authoritative access to current ideas and practice.
Data
Full-text available
Book
This collection brings together innovative research and approaches for blended learning using digital technology in interpreter education for signed and spoken languages. Volume editors Suzanne Ehrlich and Jemina Napier call upon the expertise of 21 experts, including themselves, to report on the current technology used to provide digital enhanceme...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores the development and application of rubrics to assess an experimental corpus of Auslan (Australian Sign Language)/English simultaneous interpreting performances in both language directions. Two rubrics were used, each comprising four main assessment criteria (accuracy, target text features, delivery features and processing skil...
Article
This mixed methods study investigated the effects of directionality (language direction and age of signed language acquisition on the simultaneous interpreting performance o professional English/Auslan (Australian Sign Language) interpreters, who comprise native signers and non-native signers. Each participant interpreted presentations simultaneous...
Book
This collection brings together innovative research and approaches for blended learning using digital technology in interpreter education for signed and spoken languages. Volume editors Jemina Napier and Suzanne Ehrlich call upon the expertise of 21 experts, including themselves, to report on the current technology in applying digital enhancement t...
Article
This paper reviews a sign language planning project conducted in Australia with deaf Auslan users. The Medical Signbank project utilised a cooperative language planning process to engage with the Deaf community and sign language interpreters to develop an online interactive resource of health-related signs, in order to address a gap in the health l...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the results of an international research collaboration. The aim of the study was to identify the dispositional traits of interpreters that may be predictive of occupational performance. Empirically, general cognitive ability has been shown to be highly predictive of job performance across most occupations and is considerably...
Article
Full-text available
This article details the findings of a systemic functional linguistic case study of university classroom talk, and in particular an evaluation of the storytelling that occurs in classroom talk and its functioning as a pedagogical tool with interpreting students. The data consists of two hours of naturalistic classroom talk that occurred with sign l...
Chapter
This chapter explores the culture of leadership at Macquarie University and how that might influence the culture of engagement with peer review by comparing the practices and perceptions across four faculties. In particular we examine views of “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches to peer review to investigate suggestions that a top-down approach c...
Article
The evaluation of working memory capacity (WMC) in signed language interpreters rep-resents a noticeable research gap in both cognitive psychology and interpreting studies. This study compared two scoring methods - total items and proportion items - for an English listening span task and an Auslan (Australian Sign Language) working memory (WM) span...
Chapter
The chapter will give an overview of a qualitative study conducted in Australia, which sought to gain an in-depth picture of the preventive and on-going needs of deaf people that use Auslan in terms of access to healthcare information. Using a purposeful sampling approach, this study surveyed the Deaf community throughout Australia about their perc...
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to gain insight into how Deaf Australians who use Auslan as their primary language perceive their English literacy and if they feel that they can sufficiently access preventative and ongoing health care information, and to explore their views in regards to accessing information in Auslan. A phenomenological, inductive study, with...
Article
Full-text available
With an increasing migrant population worldwide requiring community interpreting services, the role of the community interpreter has been a critical focus in interpreting studies research. As Australia is a multicultural country and one of the leading countries in providing community interpreting services, with a large proportion of immigrants from...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated the effects of hearing status and age of signed language acquisition on signed language working memory capacity. Professional Auslan (Australian sign language)/English interpreters (hearing native signers and hearing nonnative signers) and deaf Auslan signers (deaf native signers and deaf nonnative signers) completed an Ausl...
Chapter
Interpreting is an applied linguistic activity; the act of mediating between languages and cultures involves the application of linguistic knowledge across a wide range of communicative settings.Keywords:deaf communication;interpretation;sign linguistics
Chapter
As with interpreting research more generally, signed language interpreting (SLI) research is an emerging subdiscipline of translation studies.Keywords:deaf communication;interpretation;sign linguistics
Article
Full-text available
Until recently no linguistic research had been carried out on Australian Sign Language (Auslan) with regard to its use in healthcare settings, although anecdotal information suggests that the health lexicon of Auslan is strikingly under-developed. This paper describes a study that examined health terminology from the perspective of deaf people. Bas...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores the concept of "accuracy" in the context of interpretermediated healthcare interaction by reporting on a study of simulated doctor-patient consultations involving professional Australian Sign Language (Auslan)/English interpreters. Wadensjö's (1998) taxonomy of renditions is used to analyse the ways interpreters convey health in...
Chapter
This article describes signed language interpreting (SLI) as an emerging discipline. It provides a survey of the history and characteristics of SLI, the settings where signed language interpreters work, a summary of SLI research, and a description of the current state of the field. Historically, SLI has functioned as a separate entity from translat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper proposes that variance in interpreter performance is dependent on factors of both general cognitive ability and personality. Whilst there is no doubt of the interplay between individual personality traits and job performance across many occupations, the greatest interest lies in determining which traits play the most important role; and...
Article
This paper presents findings of an innovative study, which involved the thematic and content analyses of discussions held by deaf people, hearing people and interpreters about signed language interpreting in Australia. Six focus groups yielded eight hours of data, which was analyzed to identify themes that emerged about participants’ perceptions ab...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we describe an Australian project in which linguists, signed language interpreters, medical and health care professionals, and members of the Deaf community use the technology of the Internet to facilitate cooperative language development. A web-based, interactive multimedia lexicon, an encyclopedic dictionary, and a database of Aus...
Article
I am the eldest child of a deaf couple in England. My father was the only deaf person in his family, and he was raised orally. He learned British Sign Language (BSL) when he met my mother and now uses BSL as his preferred language for communication. He works in a hearingdominated workplace and regularly attends the local deaf club. My mother comes...
Article
This chapter explores the linguistic features and strategies of interpreting, particularly in higher education, through the description of various research projects involving Australian Sign Language (Auslan)/English interpreters, and their application to the education and practice of sign language interpreters. It discusses research studies focusi...
Book
From the moment the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) was established in 2005, an overwhelming wave of requests from around the world arrived seeking information and resources for educating and training interpreters. This new collection provides those answers with an international overview on interpreter training from experts...