Jelina Haines

Jelina Haines
University of South Australia | UniSA · UniSA-STEM

PHD LCAV DMAC DMBF DCBI
Video Ethnographer+HCI+Visual Narrative, Visual Arts Designer+Cultural Liaison+Educator, CBPR, Information Behaviour

About

15
Publications
15,242
Reads
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45
Citations
Introduction
Jelina Haines obtained her PhD studies in Information Studies at the School of UniSA STEM, University of South Australia. Jelina is a visual art designer by training and co-founder of Ngarrindjeri Eco Art Coop and founder of the Philippine Literacy Backpack Project. Jelina is also a Lead Investigator of the Unfinished Business project: Life, Death and Dying in Indigenous context, social media blogger by night, video ethnographer and academic by day, and storyteller at heart.
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - March 2022
University of South Australia
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2009 - May 2022
Proprietor of SunRay Wearable Art
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • South Australian Textile/Fibre Visual Artist and Surface Designer.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
While there is a considerable amount of interest in information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D) in the Indigenous communities, it remains limited to those who can afford it and have the skills and knowledge to implement the technology and access appropriate digital tools. Hence, Indigenous communities are continually stigmati...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstract -------------------------------------------- The rapid development and widespread use of automated technology have ushered in a tremendous digital transformation for humanity. This digital transformation, which affects every aspect of our lives, has begun to completely envelop and transform us, from our business practices to our customer...
Book
LES NGARRINDJERI ou la vitalité ďune culture en Australie du Sud, in Le Voyage de découtes aux Terres Australes 1800-1804, pages 116-124
Book
Kondoli: the Keeper of Fire is a sculpture of a southern right whale woven entirely from freshwater rushes. Kondoli (Whale) was a strong man with the ability to make fire. This magnificent work, which immortalises the story of the Kondoli, measures more than four metres in length. The fins, mouth and eyes are delicately woven using the elegance of...
Conference Paper
This visual presentation reflects on the broader uses of video as a valuable tool for ethical recording of the stories and cultural practices of Indigenous Elders. The opportunities afforded by the use of the video were threefold, by its impact on the accuracy, truthful engagement, and connection with the Indigenous community. The inclusion of vari...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This visual presentation is a timely topic while celebrating the year of Indigenous languages and cultures. However, the continuing impact of colonization, displacement, and oppression still lingers. Cultural traditions, once central to all knowledge practices, have been suppressed or subjugated by Western hegemony. This paper aimed to qualitativel...
Article
Advances in technology have transformed our daily life communication activities. These days, online communication has become a norm and universally follows patterns of mass information sharing. In the Indigenous context, the community is inundated with the sheer volume of data available online. Thus, the capability of retrieving Elders' knowledge r...
Article
In this paper, we reflected on the ethical information research based on our two studies conducted with an Indigenous community in South Australia. The first study was about understanding how Indigenous people interact with information and communication technologies (ICTs) on their traditional land and how they perceive the role of ICTs in the comm...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction. This study investigates Indigenous Elders’ oral knowledge creation as it is transmitted intergenerationally through storytelling. Synthesising oral knowledge to written text is problematic because the integrity of the spoken knowledge must be altered to suit the dominant language system, sometimes devaluing its significance. Method. U...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper is part of an ongoing South Australian research project examining the knowledge creation and sharing practices of Indigenous people. This paper details the theoretical aspects underpinning a pilot study conducted with four senior Indigenous Elders and one young participant between the months of January and June 2016. A visual ethnographi...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster is a short abstract of my doctoral project. Knowledge journey in context Indigenous people have a unique knowledge system safeguarded by chosen Elders’ who are given the duty to pass on this knowledge to the next generation. Understanding of Indigenous Elder’s expertise and practical knowledge concerning the land and the community are...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction. This paper reports the first stage of an ongoing information behaviour research project undertaken with a rural Indigenous community in South Australia. Method. Twenty-one Ngarrindjeri volunteers participated in the field study. Permission was granted and extensive community consultations were conducted. Analysis. Questionnaires and i...
Conference Paper
This paper is part of a doctoral study of re-affirming ethical research practices for and with the Indigenous community. This study aimed was to raise the issues and concerns when it comes to intellectual copyright, protocol and meaningful governance of Indigenous knowledge. Subsequent to this, as non-indigenous researchers, we are still grappling...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Throughout human history, Indigenous cultural stories have been transmitted orally through narrative storytelling, music, art, and ceremony. Research suggests that storytelling is at the heart of social and personal identity whether the story relates to our daily activities or whichever other stories the elders choose to share to others. This pape...

Questions

Questions (11)
Question
I am currently working on a pilot study with South Australian Palliative Care, looking at the 'Unfinished Business' project. This discussion is designed to create a dialogue across diverse cultures. This discussion is aimed at understanding other cultures manages grief. I hope to share ideas and experiences of managing the grief of losing someone and strategies for overcoming loneliness. Looking forward to hearing about your experiences.
Sincerely,
Jelina
Question
As a professional artist, I see my practices as a tool to engage with others and understanding the world around me. Creativity allowed us to face challenges and inspired our every endeavour. How about you? How do you define creativity and how sensory affects our behaviour impacts the way we think?
Question
I am seeking collaborative ideas relevant to the given question.
Which one you prefer:
1. Traditional ways (Indigenous ways of knowing) or
2. Western knowledge system
And why, or can be a combination but how.
Any response will be greatly appreciated.
Warm regards,
Jelina Haines
Question
Do you have experience working with the Indigenous community? If you do, I am kindly seeking your response and opinions of the given question. In your opinion what would be the best technology that is appropriate.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (8)
Project
The art of Ngarrindjeri Feather Flower Artmaking.
Project
Ponawi Yarning is focused on using video to record Ngarrindjeri cultural stories shared during traditional activities. Ponawi is a Ngarrindjeri word for 'death. This word is rarely utter because of its meaning, and in the Indigenous community, the passing of many Elders affects the whole community. In this case, some Ngarrindjeri community members experience losing someone who felt isolated and often, mental stress follows. The Ponawi Yarning hopes to focus on providing continuing support to affected families through creative social engagement and community gathering. Cultural activities like the Ngarrindjeri weaving and feather flower art-making will alleviate the loneliness and yarning during creative gathering provide a space for shared storytelling. Ponawi Yarning is aimed at providing creative gathering activities to Ngarrindjeri Elders who have lost their closest family member and their family. Weaving and Feather flower art-making hope to alleviate the loneliness and isolation and provide a shared space for healing and to deal with ponawi. The weaving and feather flower art-making are traditional activities involving gathering the materials at various places. Although, the proposed activities are not new. It is a way of connecting the Elders and their family back to the land, with the outcome to support the mind and well-being of affected community members physically.