Jelena V. Vlajic

Jelena V. Vlajic
Queen's University Belfast | QUB · Queen's Management School

Dr

About

34
Publications
15,559
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
634
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
462 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Dr Jelena Vlajic, FHEA, FCILT works as Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor at Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast. Jelena does research in Supply Chain Management, Operations and Logistics. Their current project is 'Waste Not, Want Not: Contributing to a Sustainable Food Industry by Managing Food Waste.', as well as a few projects focused on Circular Economy in the food industry.
Additional affiliations
October 2012 - present
Queen's University Belfast
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Sustainable supply chains and networks Global supply chains and logistics Operations management
October 2012 - present
Queen's University Belfast
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2007 - September 2012
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Project: A modelling approach for designing robust international food logistics networks
Education
September 2013 - December 2014
Queen's University Belfast
Field of study
  • Teaching/Higher education
January 2007 - September 2012
Wageningen Univeristy
Field of study
  • Food supply chain management
December 2005 - December 2005
University of Belgrade The Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering
Field of study
  • Supply chain management

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
After years of emphasis on leanness and responsiveness businesses are now experiencing their vulnerability to supply chain disturbances. Although more literature is appearing on this subject, there is a need for an integrated framework to support the analysis and design of robust food supply chains. In this paper we present such a framework. We def...
Chapter
The aim of this paper is to analyse vulnerability and robustness of small and medium size enterprises (SMEs) supply chains and to consider contextual factors that might influence the success of their disturbance management: Risky product and business environment. By using an exploratory case study it is shown how these contextual factors attribute...
Article
In an era of increased scarcity of resources and pollution, the concept of the circular economy is re-emerging to steer supply chains towards more sustainable business practices. The potential of value recovery provides opportunities for the creation of circular supply chains. Reverse flows and value recovery processes are scarcely studied in the c...
Article
Available at: https://pure.qub.ac.uk/en/publications/evaluation-of-scenarios-for-improving-energy-efficiency-and-reduc. Abstract: Improvement of energy efficiency and exhaust emissions reduction are environmental targets of utmost importance in the transport and traffic sectors. The literature suggests that there is a need for the development of...
Conference Paper
Purpose: Since the development of supply chain management, it is recognized that supply chain relationships are an essential element that leads to the competitiveness of supply chains (Lambert and Cooper, 2000), and now it is clear they are essential for achieving supply chain sustainability and circular economy (Sudusinghe and Seuring, 2022). Howe...
Chapter
The world is facing increasing economic, environmental, and social sustainability challenges. Agri-Food supply chains play an intrinsic part in these as both, heavy users of natural resources and a supplier of essential resources satisfying societal needs. In the context of the circular economy, focusing on Reduce, Reuse and Recycle, (3R waste hier...
Chapter
Temperature is considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of foods. Improper temperature control and settings in the food cold chain can accelerate the deterioration of food quality, which can leverage the generation of food losses and food waste. Review of literature in this chapter showed that there is a high rate of temperatur...
Conference Paper
World is facing increasing economic, environmental and social sustainability challenges, and agri-food businesses play an intrinsic part in it as both, heavy user of natural resources and supplier of resources that satisfy societal needs. Reduce, Reuse and Recycle, so-called 3R practices are in the core of efficient and effective use and recovery o...
Article
Full-text available
Increased changes of trading rules in a global economy, more frequent adverse weather events due to climate change, and other unexpected events add more uncertainty to the ever-present logistics challenges for companies to manage their supply chains. Thus, there is increased theoretical and practical interest to prevent disturbances of logistics op...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Purpose: Purpose: To achieve business goals, the companies create business relationships with multiple business partners and they participate in multiple supply chains (Soosay and Hyland, 2015). Naturally, there is a variety of collaboration levels between a company and its suppliers and customers or other businesses (Ralston, Richey and Grawe, 2...
Article
The management of food cold chains is receiving more and more attention, both in practice and in the scientific literature. In this paper, we review temperature abuse in food cold chains that operate in different countries, as well as cold chain solutions focused on food quality and safety. Our key findings are: 1) temperature management in chilled...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Purpose of this paper: Since 2001 the study of supply chain resilience has a growing attention of academics and practitioners. It addresses the recovery of systems after unexpected changes (Kamalahmadi and Parast, 2016; Linnenluecke, 2015). Flexibility and redundancy are two prominent principles used in the literature on the resilience of a system...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Full paper available at: http://www.isl21.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/ISL-Proceedings-2016.pdf
Chapter
Today’s business environment and harsh competitiveness force companies and entire supply chains to increase their efficiency as much as possible. As a consequence, supply chains have become highly sensitive to disruptions and less tolerant to deviations in operations, that is, supply chains have become more vulnerable (see Kleindorfer and Saad, 200...
Conference Paper
Increased attention to employability of students, higher complexity of decision making, and student surveys indicate the need for the development of innovative teaching approaches for Operations and Supply Chain Management courses. In this paper we present one type of innovative teaching approach applied in a graduate supply chain management course...
Article
Full-text available
High effectiveness and leanness of modern supply chains (SCs) increase their vulnerability, i.e. susceptibility to disturbances reflected in non-robust SC performances. Both the SC management literature and SC professionals indicate the need for the development of SC vulnerability assessment tools. In this article, a new method for vulnerability as...
Article
Full-text available
This paper addresses the problem of optimally locating intermodal freight terminals in Serbia. To solve this problem and determine the effects of the resulting scenarios, two modeling approaches were combined. The first approach is based on multiple-assignment hub-network design, and the second is based on simulation. The multiple-assignment p-hub...
Chapter
Purpose: Today's business environment is characterized by challenges of strong global competition where companies tend to achieve leanness and maximum responsiveness to customer demand. Lean supply chain networks are vulnerable to all kind of disruptions. For food supply chain networks (FSCNs), due to their inherent characteristics on the one hand...
Conference Paper
Efficient supply chains are vulnerable to unexpected changes in realization of logistic and production processes. This vulnerability is manifested as sudden hiccups or surges in chain's performance values. Objective of the companies is to have robust performances. In this paper we show that it is possible to achieve supply chain robustness, or at l...
Conference Paper
After years of emphasis on leanness and responsiveness businesses are now experiencing their vulnerability to supply chain disturbances. Although more literature is appearing on this subject, there is a need for an integrated framework to support the analysis and design of robust food supply chains. In this paper we present such a framework. We def...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Today’s business environment is characterized by challenges of strong global competition where companies tend to achieve leanness and maximum responsiveness. However, lean supply chain networks (SCNs) become more vulnerable to all kind of disruptions. Food SCNs have to become robust, i.e. they should be able to continue to function in the event of...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (9)
Project
To work with researchers interested in in circular economy models and innovations to consider how these models and innovations can help to mitigate risks and uncertainties in agri-food supply chains To create a very interesting special issue in journal Sustainability: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sustainability/special_issues/5B0CUH9BGE
Project
This project aims to identify crucial factors, strategies and practices, as well as extent to their use that ultimately lead to increased supply chain resilience.
Project
To investigate nature and types of circularity in food supply chains. We defined circular supply chains as “a connected network of organisations involved in the design and management of value-adding processes and value recovery of a product, component or material” (Vlajic, Mijailovic and Bogdanova, 2018, p. 523). Both, value-adding and value recovery activities contribute to economic, social and environmental sustainability.