Jeffrey V. Yule

Jeffrey V. Yule
Utah Tech University

Ph.D., Ecology and Evolution; Ph.D., English
Teaching a new paleoart class with two colleagues.

About

34
Publications
10,853
Reads
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57
Citations
Introduction
I have broad interests in environmental studies, centering especially on the causes and consequences of extinction; the roles and functions of science and technology in society; and the ways in which a focus on science and literature can inform our understanding of and perspectives on all of these topics.
Additional affiliations
June 2015 - March 2020
Dixie State University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • In addition to teaching interdisciplinary classes on topics including Extinction and Science and Nature Writing, I am a professor and former chair of the Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Department and Director of the Booth Honors Program.
June 2007 - May 2015
Louisiana Tech University
Position
  • Professor
Education
September 2004 - June 2007
Stony Brook University
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolution

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Late Pleistocene extinctions occurred globally over a period of about 50,000 years, primarily affecting mammals of > or = 44 kg body mass (i.e., megafauna) first in Australia, continuing in Eurasia and, finally, in the Americas. Polarized debate about the cause(s) of the extinctions centers on the role of climate change and anthropogenic factors (e...
Article
Full-text available
On the whole, the conservation biology com-munity doesn't support the use of cloning to return extinct species to life, but there are persuasive philoso-phical and practical reasons for giving the idea another hearing. To begin with, there's little reason to fear Ju-rassic Park-type scenarios. The idea that dinosaur DNA could be extracted from ambe...
Article
Full-text available
Human actions have altered global environments and reduced biodiversity by causing extinctions and reducing the population sizes of surviving species. Increasing human population size and per capita resource use will continue to have direct and indirect ecological and evolutionary consequences. As a result, future generations will inhabit a planet...
Article
Full-text available
Although Late Pleistocene extinctions disproportionately affected larger mammalian species, numerous smaller species were also lost. To date, no satisfactory explanation has been presented to account for this pattern. Beginning with the assumption that human predation caused the extinctions, we offer and test the first such explanatory hypothesis,...
Article
Full-text available
A good theory is focused without being blurred by extraneous detail or overgenerality. Yet ecological theories frequently fail to achieve this desirable middle ground. Here, we review the reasons for the mismatch between what theorists seek to achieve and what they actually accomplish. In doing so, we argue on pragmatic grounds against mathematical...
Article
Full-text available
This is a positive dual review of two conservation biology books: Rewilding Agricultural Landscapes: A California Study in Rebalancing the Needs of People and Nature, edited by H. Scott Butterfield, T. Rodd Kelsey, and Abigail K. Hart (Island Press, 2021) and Standing between Life and Extinction: Ethics and Ecology of Conserving Aquatic Species in...
Article
Full-text available
This is a positive review of Ross D. E. MacPhee's book END OF THE MEGAFAUNA: THE FATE OF THE WORLD’S HUGEST, FIERCEST, AND STRANGEST ANIMALS that also pays attention to Peter Schouten's illustrations.
Article
Full-text available
This is a positive book review of Ross D. E. MacPhee's End of the Megafauna: The Fate of the World’s Hugest, Fiercest, and Strangest Animals (2019). It addresses both MacPhee's text and the paleoart by Peter Schouten that illustrate the book.T
Article
Full-text available
Effectively integrating writing into biology classes gives students the opportunity to develop a better understanding of and engagement with course content. Yet many instructors remain reluctant to emphasize writing. Some are concerned about the time commitment writing assessment requires. Others shy away from emphasizing writing in their classes b...
Article
Full-text available
This is a positive review of Darin A. Croft's 2016 book HORNED ARMADILLOS AND RAFTING MONKEYS: THE FASCINATING FOSSIL MAMMALS OF SOUTH AMERICA that also pays attention to artist Velizar Simeonovski's illustrations.
Article
Full-text available
Educators must often measure the effectiveness of their instruction. We designed, developed, and preliminarily evaluated a multiple-choice assessment tool that requires students to apply what they have learned to evaluate scientific abstracts. This examination methodology offers the flexibility to both challenge students in specific subject areas a...
Article
Full-text available
This is a positive book review of the 2013 second edition of Andre F. Clewell and James Aronson's ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION: PRINCIPLES, VALUES, AND STRUCTURES OF AN EMERGING PROFESSION.
Presentation
Full-text available
A practical analysis of the technological, ethical, ecological, and environmental issues and challenges surrounding extinct species cloning
Article
Full-text available
X. Wang, R. H. Tedford. 2008. Dogs: Their Fossil Relatives and Evolutionary History. Columbia University Press, New York, New York, 219 pp. ISBN 978-0-231-13528-3, price (hardbound), $29.95. With the help of illustrator Mauricio Anton, authors Xiaoming Wang and Richard H. Tedford provide an exemplary overview of canid evolution and an admirable co...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I'm interested in getting feedback to determine whether people's examples of anthropogenic vertebrate extinction are either consistent or relatively consistent globally or whether they vary by country or region. In addition to sharing your example(s), please share your logic/criteria in making the selection(s) you did; your country of origin and/or residence; and whether any particular aspects of your background contributed to the choice(s) you made (e.g., if as an ornithologist you were inclined to select a bird species). I will be checking back for responses for at least a year after making the initial post (i.e., through December 2018), and I will add an update here letting people know when I'm no longer looking for feedback.
Thanks very much for your time and input. I appreciate both.
Question
I'm interested in getting feedback to determine whether people's examples of anthropogenic vertebrate extinction are either consistent or relatively consistent globally or whether they vary by country or region. In addition to sharing your example(s), please share your logic/criteria in making the selection(s) you did; your country of origin and/or residence; and whether any particular aspects of your background contributed to the choice(s) you made (e.g., if as an ornithologist you were inclined to select a bird species). I will be checking back for responses for at least a year after making the initial post (i.e., through December 2018), and I will add an update here letting people know when I'm no longer looking for feedback.
Thanks very much for your time and input. I appreciate both.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
To determine more effective ways of responding to and preventing terrestrial vertebrate extinctions, although this is less a project than a long-term research interest that should extend beyond the sciences and into the humanities and interdisciplinary fields