Jeffrey M. Timberlake

Jeffrey M. Timberlake
University of Cincinnati | UC · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

38
Publications
20,945
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1,447
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Introduction
I am an urban sociologist and demographer interested in the dynamics of urban populations in the United States. My research centers on a variety of urban demographic topics, including suburbanization, gentrification, and the causes and consequences of ethnoracial residential segregation. I also conduct research on public opinion toward immigrants and immigration.
Additional affiliations
September 2003 - present
University of Cincinnati
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 1996 - June 1999
NORC at the University of Chicago
Position
  • Research Assistant
September 1992 - June 1994
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Washington, DC
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 1996 - December 2003
University of Chicago
Field of study
  • Sociology
August 1994 - May 1996
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Sociology
August 1987 - May 1991
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Social Sciences

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
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We investigate the relationship between stereotypes of immigrants and assessments of the impact of immigration on U.S. society. Our analysis exploits a split-ballot survey of registered voters in Ohio, who were asked to evaluate both the characteristics of one of four randomly assigned immigrant groups and perceived impacts of immigration. We find...
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This research examines the impact of neighborhood ethnoracial composition on the likelihood that neighborhoods that could gentrify do gentrify over time. Drawing on findings from the gentrification and residential preference literatures, we hypothesize that the percentage of Black and Latino residents in neighborhoods in 1980 is associated with the...
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The index of dissimilarity (D) has historically been and continues to be a widely used quantitative measure of residential segregation. Conventional interpretations of D imply that normatively desirable residential patterns occur when ethnoracial compositions of lower-order geographic units (such as neighborhoods) match those of higher-order units...
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Social scientists have focused some attention on the spatial and temporal patterns of minority suburbanization over the past several decades. However, we argue that no fully comprehensive analysis of suburbanization patterns yet exists along three dimensions simultaneously: the entire suburban landscape, in all metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs)...
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We complement and extend research on change in racial and ethnic residential segregation by estimating determinants of change from 1970 to 2000 in four measures of residential inequality—dissimilarity, entropy, isolation, and net difference—between American Whites, Blacks, Asians, and Latinos. Because we use a longer time horizon and multiple measu...
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Residential segregation refers to the separation of two or more socially defined groups in residential space. Analyses of residential segregation generally track temporal trends and geographic patterns in segregation, and attempt to understand the causes and consequences of segregation. In the United States, African Americans are highly segregated...
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No abstract is available for this article.
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The purpose of this paper is to explain the timing and location of the diffusion of heavy metal music. We use data from an Internet archive to measure the population-adjusted rate of metal band foundings in 150 countries for the 1991-2008 period. We hypothesize that growth in "digital capacity" (Internet and personal computer use) catalyzed the dif...
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This research examines recent trends in the suburbanization of poor non‐Latino Whites, Blacks, and Asians, and Latinos of all races in the United States. The authors find strong associations between a temporally lagged measure of suburban housing supply and poverty suburbanization during the period 2006–2010 for all groups, but these associations a...
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The public and nonprofit sectors are known for providing enhanced employment opportunity to women, persons of color, and parents. The authors ask whether the same is true for workers without college degrees, examining sectoral differences in access to jobs offering fringe benefits, full-time hours, and schedule flexibility. The authors find that th...
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Women often face trade-offs in fulfilling both employment and household responsibilities. One indicator of this is commute time, a compromise between the stresses of longer work journeys and potentially expanded job options. Women spend less time commuting than men and thus may have fewer work opportunities. While prior research finds a link betwee...
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Recent research using national-level data finds that economic recessions are associated with improved population health in the United States. The present study utilizes data from Ohio to assess whether these conclusions hold at the county level, occur immediately at the onset of a recession, and vary by education and race. The data show that at the...
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Objective This study explores variation in stereotypes of U.S. immigrants from Latin America, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. Method We exploit a split-ballot design in two waves of the Ohio Poll to test hypotheses about effects of contextual and respondent-level characteristics on immigrant stereotypes. ResultsRespondents generally rated Asian...
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The goal of this study is to examine the extent to which population shifts over the post-Great Migration period and divergent trends in segregation across regions contributed to the overall decline in black segregation in the United States in recent decades. Using data from the 1970 to 2000 decennial censuses and the 2005-2009 American Community Su...
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Stress in the social environment can affect individual health. Election of the first Black President of the United States provides an opportunity to assess how a positive change in the macro-political climate impacts the health of Americans. Past research suggests that race-related political events influence the health of non-dominant racial groups...
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This research examines recent trends in suburbanization for non-Latino Whites, Blacks, and Asians, and Latinos of all races. The authors find some association between group-level acculturation and socioeconomic status and 2000 suburbanization rates; however, these associations are largely attenuated by controls for suburban housing supply and do no...
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Research in the United States has shown that children growing up in 2-parent households do better in school than children from single-parent households. We used the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) data to test whether this finding applied to other countries as well (N = 100,307). We found that it did, but that the educ...
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I construct covariate-adjusted increment-decrement life tables to estimate racial differences in the duration of children's exposure to neighborhood poverty and affluence. Using geocoded data from the 1999 and 2001 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I estimate that black children born in 1999 can expect to spend about 9 of their first 18...
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This research investigates the extent to which racial and ethnic inequality in children’s neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) is exacerbated or attenuated via two mechanisms: changing neighborhood characteristics for residentially nonmobile children, and differences in the SES of destination versus origin neighborhoods for residentially mobile...
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In the 1990 and 2000 U.S. censuses, more than 40 percent of Latinos selected an "other" racial self-identification, indicating that many Latinos do not locate themselves in the prevailing American racial nomenclature. With a sample of three large groups of U.S. Latinos, this research examines how national origin, skin color and immigrant generation...
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Despite much scholarly attention to "neighborhood effects" on children, no study to date has measured the cumulative exposure of children to neighborhood poverty and affluence. In this article, I estimate racial and ethnic inequality in the amount of time children can expect to live in poor and nonpoor neighborhoods throughout childhood. At rates p...
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Several social scientific perspectives suggest that racial and ethnic stereotypes vary by the sex of minority group members. However, prior research has not used survey data to test the hypothesis that the public holds strong gendered racial/ethnic stereotypes. We exploit a between-subjects experiment in the Multi-City Study of Urban Inequality to...
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Only three decades ago, many demographers believed that the nuclear family – married adults and their biological children – was the modal family structure toward which all societies would rapidly converge (e.g. Goode, 1970). Indeed, during the two decades following World War II, marriage and childbearing in most Western nations tended to: (1) occur...
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The prevalence of nonmarital cohabitation is steadily increasing in the United States. In evaluating the contribution of this new living arrangement to family formation, analysts have relied primarily on comparisons between individuals who cohabit and those who do not. We complement this line of inquiry by comparing the United States and 16 industr...
Thesis
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Chicago, Dept. of Sociology, December 2003. Includes bibliographical references.
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When citizens are presented with alternative policy solutions to a given social problem, why do they choose to support one over another? In this article, the authors analyze a survey of residents of the five largest U.S. metropolitan areas to understand determinants of public support for spending on three major components of American drug control p...
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We investigate how recent changes in the Western family have affected childhood living arrangements. For 17 developed countries, we use multistate life table techniques to estimate childhood trajectories of coresidence with biological fathers versus other maternal partners. In all countries childhood exposure to single parenting is more often cause...
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We investigate how recent changes in the Western family have affected childhood living arrangements. For 17 developed countries, we use multistate life table techniques to estimate childhood trajectories of coresi-dence with biological fathers versus other maternal partners. In all countries childhood exposure to single parenting is more often caus...
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Since the early 1980s, federal drug control expenditures have soared in response to six presidential administrations’ commitment to the “war on drugs.” During this period, spending on criminal justice programs grew from 30% of the total drug control budget to 52%, whereas the share devoted to drug treatment programs declined from 31% to 18%. Althou...
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Much recent scholarship has focused on inequality in the socioeconomic status of neighborhoods in which different racial and ethnic groups are concentrated. However, the most widely used measures of residential inequality merely describe the extent to which groups are nominally differentiated in residential space. I use 1980 and 1990 U.S. Census da...
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Objective. In this article we investigate why traditionally conservative social groups show less support for spending on drug rehabilitation programs than for drug control spending in general. Methods. Using data from the 1984 through 1998 General Social Surveys, we first estimate logistic regressions of support for drug control spending across fiv...
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I use the 1993 Atlanta Survey of Urban Inequality to evaluate the effects of five types of racial and class attitudes on assessments of the desirability of residential integration: (1) preferences for neighbors of the same race, (2) perceived racial differences in social class characteristics, (3) Whites’perceptions of group threat from Blacks, (4)...

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