Jeffrey R Lucas

Jeffrey R Lucas
Purdue University | Purdue · Department of Biological Sciences

M.S., PhD

About

139
Publications
26,903
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Introduction
Our lab primarily works on animal communication. We study vocal signal processing in birds, and especial seasonal plasticity in the auditory system. We also study aspects of vocal complexity in both the song and call systems of Carolina chickadees.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
Georgia State University
January 2012 - present
University of Tartu
January 2010 - December 2011

Publications

Publications (139)
Article
Full-text available
Development of wind energy facilities results in interactions between wildlife and wind turbines. Raptors, including bald and golden eagles, are among the species known to incur mortality from these interactions. Several alerting technologies have been proposed to mitigate this mortality by increasing eagle avoidance of wind energy facilities. Howe...
Article
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Social associations within mixed-species bird flocks can promote information flow about food availability and provide predator avoidance benefits. The relationship between flocking propensity, foraging habitat quality, and interspecific competition can be altered by human-induced habitat degradation. Here we take a close look at sociality within tw...
Article
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Individual recognition via communication signals is a critical component of social behavior, and provides the basis of conflict resolution, territorial behavior, and mate choice. However, the function of chemical signals in mammalian individual recognition and conflict resolution has largely been unexplored despite olfaction being a dominant sensor...
Article
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Multimodal communication in animals is common, and is particularly well studied in signals that include both visual and auditory components. Multimodal signals that combine acoustic and olfactory components are less well known. Multimodal communication plays a crucial role in agonistic interactions in many mammals, but relatively little is known ab...
Article
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Synopsis The almost limitless complexity of biology has led to two general approaches to understanding biological phenomena. One approach is dominated by reductionism in which high-level phenomena of whole systems are viewed as emerging from relatively simple and generally understood interactions at a substantially lower level. Although this approa...
Article
Full-text available
The almost limitless complexity of biology has led to two general approaches to understanding biological phenomena. One approach is dominated by reductionism in which high-level phenomena of whole systems are viewed as emerging from relatively simple and generally understood interactions at a substantially lower level. Although this approach is the...
Article
Full-text available
Aggression among group housed male mice continues to challenge laboratory animal researchers because mitigation strategies are generally applied at the cage level without a good understanding of how it affects the dominance hierarchy. Aggression within a group is typically displayed by the dominant mouse targeting lower ranking subordinates; thus,...
Article
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In highly vocal species, territorial aggression is often accompanied using vocalizations. These vocalizations can play a critical role in determining the outcome of male–male agonistic interactions. For this, vocalizations of contestants must contain information that is indicative of each competitor's fighting ability as well as its identity, and a...
Article
Synopsis Most animals experience reproductive transitions in their lives; for example, reaching reproductive maturity or cycling in and out of breeding condition. Some reproductive transitions are abrupt, while others are more gradual. In most cases, changes in communication between the sexes follow the time course of these reproductive transitions...
Article
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Excessive home cage aggression often results in severe injury and subsequent premature euthanasia of male laboratory mice. Aggression can be reduced by transferring used nesting material during cage cleaning, which is thought to contain aggression appeasing odors from the plantar sweat glands. However, neither the composition of plantar sweat nor t...
Article
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• Territorial aggression in birds is widely observed and is commonly linked to sex, age, body size, physiology, seasonal cues, food resource, urbanization, and a variety of social contexts including conspecific audience effects. However, little is known about the heterospecific audience effects on territorial aggression. • Here, we address an emerg...
Article
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Signals containing parameter trade‐offs are likely to be honest indicators of signaler quality, because they are difficult to produce. Signals with a trill‐rate/bandwidth trade‐off have been described for many songbird species, one mouse and one non‐human primate species. However, there were no reports about whether there is a vocal performance tra...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chemical communication is an important aspect of social behavior in almost all animals. Here, we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect the chemical composition, and behavioral tests to evaluate the potential function of forehead gland secretions between adult male Great Himalayan leaf-nosed bats, Hipposideros armiger . Our res...
Article
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Animal signallers are subject to audience effects when they alter communication due to changes in the presence or characteristics of receivers. Studies aimed at understanding audience effects have typically examined effects of conspecific audiences on signaller communication. Less work has focused on heterospecific audiences, which present an impor...
Article
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Keywords: behavioural coordination hypothesis communication Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis mate bonding hypothesis signal diversity social brain hypothesis social cognition social complexity social entropy social network Social cognition involves a wide range of processes, including the ability to recognize group members, to remember past in...
Article
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Piglet crushing is a devastating welfare concern on swine farms; however, some sows appear unresponsive to a piglet’s call. Sow hearing ability is rarely considered despite the extensive body of research performed on crushing. In this study, pigs of four age groups (weaning, n = 7; gilts, n = 5; 2nd and 3rd parity, n = 5; 5th parity and up, n = 5)...
Article
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Mixed-species bird flocks are complex social systems comprising core and satellite members. Flocking species are sensitive to habitat disturbance, but we are only beginning to understand how species-specific responses to habitat disturbance affect interspecific associations in these flocks. Here we demonstrate the effects of human-induced habitat d...
Data
Passive acoustic recording methods. (DOCX)
Data
Candidate model set for survivorship encounter data. If parameters were non-estimable with link function, a sin function was applied instead. Apparent survival probability is denoted as Φ, probability of detection is denoted as p, and estimates of each were averaged across candidate models with a cumulative weight of ≤ 0.95. Parameters were modeled...
Data
QAIC model set for abundance analysis. Covariate models on intercept (α) and individual heterogeneity (σ) parameters include intercept only (.) and group effect (g), while the number of unmarked individuals in the population (U) included group effect (g). (DOCX)
Data
Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model selection results for CACH and TUTI captured in Indiana from fall 2015 to fall 2017. Models with cumulative weight of ≤ 0.95 are shown. (DOCX)
Data
Relative frequencies, relative dominances, relative densities, and importance values of trees (≥ 10 cm dbh) at the mid-disturbed site (MART), most-disturbed site (STEP), and the undisturbed site (ROSS). (DOCX)
Data
Aerial image of our three sites, each at a different stand of a forest remnant network. Stephens Forest (most-disturbed site) is approximately 65 km from Ross Biological Reserve (undisturbed site). Ross Biological Reserve and Martell Forest (mid-disturbed site) are separated by approximately 5 km. (TIFF)
Data
Sample summary for banded Carolina chickadees and tufted titmice among the three sites in West-central Indiana. (DOCX)
Data
Model-averaged detection probability estimates (± SE)a for each site. (DOCX)
Data
Change in tree population measures following timber harvest. There was a small decrease in mean measures of basal area, population density (pop. density), and total basal area (cover) from pre-harvest to post-harvest at the timber-harvest site. Lower and upper confidence limits and standard errors (SE) are listed for each variable, as well as stand...
Article
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Despite much interest in sow welfare, the impact of the acoustic environment on sow reactivity to her piglets is rarely considered. The objective of this study was to understand the impact of noise produced by mechanical ventilation and other sows on a sow’s reactivity to her piglets. Sows were farrowed in one of three environments: 1) with eight o...
Article
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Though many studies focused on piglet crushing utilizing piglet vocalizations to test sow response, none have verified the properties of test vocalizations against actual crushing events. Ten sows were observed 48 h after parturition, and crushing events were recorded from all sows. When a crushing event occurred, a second piglet within the same li...
Article
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The Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis proposes that individuals in complex social groups require sophisticated social cognition. This hypothesis has advanced our understanding of the complex social lives of animals and how individuals interact with others in their groups. Machiavellian intelligence is the capacity of an individual to alter the...
Article
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A common assumption in sexual selection studies is that receivers decode signal information similarly. However, receivers may vary in how they rank signallers if signal perception varies with an individual's sensory configuration. Furthermore, receivers may vary in their weighting of different elements of multimodal signals based on their sensory c...
Article
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Many animals communicate with multimodal signals. While we have an understanding of multimodal signal production, we know relatively less about receiver filtering of multimodal signals and whether filtering capacity in one modality influences filtering in a second modality. Most multimodal signals contain a temporal element, such as change in frequ...
Article
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Variation in male signal production has been extensively studied because of its relevance to animal communication and sexual selection. Although we now know much about the mechanisms that can lead to variation between males in the properties of their signals, there is still a general assumption that there is little variation in terms of how females...
Article
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Courtship signals are often complex and include components within and across sensory modalities. Unfortunately, the evidence for how multimodal signals affect female preference functions is still rather limited. This is an important scientific gap because preference function shape can indicate which male traits are under the strongest selection. We...
Article
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Mixed-species groups are common and are thought to provide benefits to group members via enhanced food finding and antipredator abilities. These benefits could accrue due to larger group sizes in general but also to the diverse species composition in the groups. We tested these possibilities using a novel feeder test in a wild songbird community co...
Article
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Copying others can be used to enhance foraging and mating opportunities, but can be costly due to the need to monitor the actions of others, which can take time away from foraging and antipredator vigilance. However, little is known about the way animals monitor conspecifics. We investigated the mechanism that European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris,...
Chapter
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Previous research on songbirds has typically focused on variation in production of vocal communication signals. These studies have addressed the mechanisms and functional significance of variation in vocal production across species and, within species, across seasons and among individuals (e.g., males of varying resource-holding capacity). However,...
Article
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Bird song is typically depicted as a male singing a long-distance signal to potentially unknown receivers to (1) deter males and (2) attract females. Nevertheless, many songbirds sing from close distances to a known receiver; males of these species may be under more intense selective pressure to modify their songs depending on the sex of the receiv...
Article
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Songs mediate mate attraction and territorial defence in songbirds during the breeding season. Outside of the breeding season, the avian vocal repertoire often includes calls that function in foraging, antipredator and social behaviours. Songs and calls can differ substantially in their spectral and temporal content. Given seasonal variation in the...
Article
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We examined temporal processing of harmonic tone complexes in two woodland species (tufted titmice and white-breasted nuthatches) and two open-habitat species (house sparrows and white-crowned sparrows). Envelope and fine-structure processing were quantified using the envelope following response (EFR) and frequency following response (FFR). We pred...
Article
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The evolution of vocal signals can be constrained by a host of factors including habitat effects on sound propagation, morphology of sound-producing structures and phylogenetic relationships among species. Here, we asked whether auditory sensitivity over a broad range of frequencies correlates with the spectral content of conspecific vocalizations,...
Article
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Numerous studies have shown that testosterone (T) increases singing rates of passerine birds, but much less is known about the influence of T on non-song vocalizations, particularly in non-passerine species. Woodpeckers (order Piciformes) give several non-song vocalizations in a variety of social contexts throughout the year, including whinny and p...
Article
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Animals generally live in multisensory worlds; however, our understanding of multisensory perception is rather limited, despite its relevance for explaining the mechanisms behind social interactions, such as collective detection while foraging in groups. We tested how multisensory stimuli affected the antipredator behavior of dark-eyed juncos (Junc...
Article
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Mice are housed at temperatures (20-26°C) that increase their basal metabolic rates and impose high energy demands to maintain core temperatures. Therefore, energy must be reallocated from other biological processes to increase heat production to offset heat loss. Supplying laboratory mice with nesting material may provide sufficient insulation to...
Article
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Pigs may be housed individually in both production and research settings. Gregarious by nature, pigs kept in isolation may show behavioural and physiological signs of stress. In this study we investigated the preference of individually housed pigs, for social and non-social enrichments. Three enrichment items were compared: a mat (MAT), a companion...
Article
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Many species of songbirds exhibit dramatic seasonal variation in song output. Recent evidence suggests that seasonal changes in auditory processing are coincident with seasonal variation in vocal output. Here, we show, for the first time, that frequency selectivity and temporal resolution of the songbird auditory periphery change seasonally and in...
Article
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In laboratories, mice are housed at 20-24°C, which is below their lower critical temperature (≈30°C). Thus mice are potentially cold stressed, which can alter metabolism, immune function, and reproduction. These physiological changes reflect impaired wellbeing, and affect scientific outcomes. We hypothesized that nesting material would allow mice t...
Article
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The ability of a receiver to detect a signal is a product of the signal characteristics at the sender, habitat-specific degradation of the signal, and properties of the receiver's sensory system. Active space describes the maximum distance at which a receiver with a given sensory system can detect a signal in a given habitat. Here the effect of hab...
Article
Full-text available
Many male signallers convey information to female receivers in multimodal courtship displays. While much is known about how males vary in terms of signalling, variation in female detection of these multimodal signals is relatively unexplored. We suggest that there is a critical, albeit underdeveloped, link between multimodal sensory reception and i...
Article
Full-text available
The sender-receiver matching hypothesis predicts that species-specific features of vocalizations will be reflected in species-specific auditory processing. This hypothesis has most often been invoked to explain correlations between vocal frequency ranges and the frequency range of auditory sensitivity; however, it could apply to other structural fe...
Article
Full-text available
The Paridae family (chickadees, tits and titmice) is an interesting avian group in that species vary in important aspects of their social structure and many species have large and complex vocal repertoires. For this reason, parids represent an important set of species for testing the social complexity hypothesis for vocal communication--the notion...
Article
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The article discusses how the avian family Paridae-the chickadees, fits, and titmice, generally found in North America, Europe or Asia, use calls to communicate with their flockmates. Most parids share a unique call system, the chick-a-dee call. The call has multiple notes that are arranged in diverse ways. The resulting variation is extraordinary:...
Article
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In laboratories, mice are housed at 20-24°C, which is below their lower critical temperature (≈30°C). This increased thermal stress has the potential to alter scientific outcomes. Nesting material should allow for improved behavioral thermoregulation and thus alleviate this thermal stress. Nesting behavior should change with temperature and materia...
Data
Location preference by behavior. Differences in behavior are plotted by interactions with (a) sex and (b) strain. LSM and SE are plotted and significant t-tests (value different from zero-α corrected for the number of comparisons) are indicated by asterisks. (TIF)
Data
The mean difference in nest score values between the nesting cage and the temperature cage. Nest scores partitioned by occurrences of nesting material carryover by (a) sex; and (b) strain. A negative value indicates a better nest built in the temperature cage and a positive value indicates a better nest in the nesting cage. LSM and SE are plotted a...