Jeffrey P. Hoover

Jeffrey P. Hoover
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · Illinois Natural History Survey

PhD

About

60
Publications
5,542
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,707
Citations
Introduction
Jeffrey P. Hoover currently works at the Illinois Natural History Survey, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Jeffrey does research in Parasitology, Zoology and Ecology. Their most recent publication is 'Loafing: The wild turkey's guide to the nap'.

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Full-text available
To curb fitness costs associated with obligate avian brood parasitism, some hosts have evolved to reject foreign eggs in the nest. American robins (Turdus migratorius) are among the few hosts of the brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) that mostly remove parasitic eggs from their nests. With the parasite’s eggs looking nothing like their own, Amer...
Article
Throughout North America, prescribed fire is becoming a common technique to manage natural landscapes. How this management tool affects wildlife remains poorly understood by land managers and biologists. Wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are an economically important upland game bird that thrive in forests with a diverse understory structure. Dive...
Article
Full-text available
Avian obligate brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other species that may provide care for the foreign offspring. Brood parasitism often imparts substantial fitness losses upon host nestlings when they are raised alongside the typically more competitive, larger, and older parasitic chick(s). Whereas fitness costs due to reduced host offs...
Article
Brood parasitism is the introduction of unrelated progeny into the nest or colony of a host that then raises the foreign young. This reproductive strategy has evolved independently and repeatedly among diverse animal taxa, and brood parasite–host interactions have become models for understanding coevolutionary arms races. Yet brood parasites have r...
Article
Full-text available
Global climate change and warming are altering hemispheric and local weather patterns. Altered weather patterns have great potential to affect the phenology of life history events, such as the initiation of breeding in organisms that reproduce seasonally. Long-distance migratory birds may be particularly challenged by changes in local weather on br...
Article
Raising an obligate avian brood parasite is costly for host parents because it redirects valuable parental resources from one's own offspring to genetically unrelated young. The costs of raising a brood parasite may be mediated by physiological stressors for foster parents if it requires greater or biased parental effort compared to raising non-par...
Article
Full-text available
Avian obligate brood parasites do not provide parental care for their eggs and young, and may therefore serve as a strong model system to test predictions of evolutionary sex‐allocation theories, independent of parental modulation of primary sex ratios. However, none of the handful of previous studies examining offspring sex ratio in brood parasiti...
Article
Quantifying arthropod vectors can be a time-consuming process. Here, we describe a technique to count large samples of small arthropods using ImageJ. ImageJ is an open source image processing software, produced by the National Institutes of Health, with a straightforward interface that has proven useful in quantifying small organisms (i.e., cells,...
Article
Full-text available
Density dependence is a conceptual cornerstone of avian population biology and, in territorial songbirds, past research has emphasized interactions among food limitation, density, and reproduction. Documenting the importance of density effects is central to understanding how selective forces shape life histories and population dynamics. During the...
Article
Full-text available
Females are expected to have evolved to be more discriminatory in mate choice than males as a result of greater reproductive investment into larger gametes (eggs vs. sperm). In turn, males are predicted to be more promiscuous than females, showing both a larger variance in the number of mates and a greater increase in reproductive success with more...
Poster
Full-text available
Loafing, or the resting time between foraging periods is a relatively unstudied aspect of turkey behavior and habitat use. During 2015 - 2016, we monitored 62 wild turkey hens in central Illinois using microGPS units equipped with accelerometers. GPS units logged locations every 2 hours during daylight hours, and recorded average acceleration rates...
Article
Brood-parasitic offspring sexually (mis)imprinting on the foster parents is considered one of the greatest constraints to the evolution of interspecific avian brood parasitism. While most nonparasitic juvenile birds learn the behaviours and mate choice preferences from their own parents, social parasites must avoid misimprinting on their host speci...
Article
Full-text available
Avian obligate brood parasites, which rely solely on hosts to raise their young, should choose the highest quality hosts to maximize reproductive output. Brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) are extreme host generalists, yet female cowbirds could use information based on past reproductive outcomes to make egg-laying decisions thus minimizing fitn...
Article
Full-text available
Host manipulation by parasites is generally regarded as a classic example of the extended phenotype, where selection favors parasite genes that adaptively alter their host’s phenotype. However, selection would simultaneously favor both hosts that recoup some fitness lost to infection (i.e., compensation) and the parasites that enhance transmission...
Article
Full-text available
Attempts to estimate and identify factors influencing first-year survival in passerines, survival between fledging and the first reproductive attempt (i.e. juvenile survival), have largely been confounded by natal dispersal, particularly in long-distance migratory passerines. We studied Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea) breeding in nest b...
Data
Model selection to estimate transition probabilities for Prothonotary Warblers, Protonotaria citrea, in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–10. (DOCX)
Data
Model selection to estimate recapture probabilities for Prothonotary Warblers, Protonotaria citrea, in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–10. (DOCX)
Data
Probability (mean 1 SE) of transition between fledging and four distance categories for Prothonotary Warblers in southern Illinois, USA, 2004–2010. (TIFF)
Article
Full-text available
Populations of many shorebird species appear to be declining in North America, and food resources at stopover habitats may limit migratory bird populations. We investigated body condition of, and foraging habitat and diet selection by 4 species of shorebirds in the central Illinois River valley during fall migrations 2007 and 2008 (Killdeer [Charad...
Data
Aggregate percent mass (dry) of taxa found in fall migrating Killdeer ingesta and core samples taken at collection and random sites in 2007 (n = 27) and 2008 (n = 18). Values with different letters within Taxa Orders (rows) indicate significant differences of least-squares means (Tukey-Kramer test: P≤0.05). (DOCX)
Data
Aggregate percent mass (dry) of taxa found in fall migrating Lesser Yellowlegs ingesta and core samples taken at collection and random sites in 2007 (n = 34) and 2008 (n = 20). Values with different letters within Taxa Orders (rows) indicate significant differences of least-squares means (Tukey-Kramer test: P≤0.05). (DOCX)
Data
Aggregate percent mass (dry) of taxa found in Pectoral Sandpiper ingesta and core samples taken at collection and random sites in 2007 (n = 37) and 2008 (n = 28). Values with different letters within Taxa Orders (rows) indicate significant differences of least-squares means (Tukey-Kramer test: P≤0.05). (DOCX)
Data
Aggregate percent mass (dry) of taxa found in fall migrating Least Sandpiper ingesta and core samples taken at collection and random sites in 2007 (n = 30) and 2008 (n = 17). Values with different letters within Taxa Orders (rows) indicate significant differences of least-squares means (Tukey-Kramer test: P≤0.05). (DOCX)
Article
Forest fragmentation and habitat loss on the breeding grounds of migratory songbirds have long been hypothesized to create source–sink dynamics. Forest fragments have increased the populations of many nest predators that are subsidized by food in the surrounding landscape and are themselves released from top predators. Migratory songbirds are also...
Article
Full-text available
Channelization of rivers and streams threatens bottomland forest bird communities because it can lead to the formation of lateral gullies that connect streams to adjacent wetlands and unnaturally accelerate the draining of wetlands, potentially exposing some birds to high rates of nest predation. I studied how the hydrologic restoration of off-chan...
Article
St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, is one of the most forested islands in the West Indies and provides an opportunity to conserve both resident birds and wintering neotropical migrants. We conducted double-observer point counts of landbirds in December 2005 and 2006 in Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots and National Park Service (NPS) trails in...
Article
Full-text available
Grant/Contract No: 2-D8170 RC07L24W INHS Technical Report Prepared for Illinois Department of Natural Resources
Article
Brood parasitic birds impose variable fitness costs upon their hosts by causing the partial or complete loss of the hosts' own brood. Growing evidence from multiple avian host-parasite taxa indicates that exposure of individual hosts to parasitism is not necessarily random and varies with habitat use, nest-site selection, age or other phenotypic at...
Article
Full-text available
Why do many hosts accept costly avian brood parasitism even when parasitic eggs and nestlings differ dramatically in appearance from their own? Scientists argue that evolutionary lag or equilibrium can explain this evolutionary enigma. Few, however, consider the potential of parasitic birds to enforce acceptance by destroying eggs or nestlings of h...
Article
Avian brood parasitism reduces the success of parasitized broods, yet most hosts of brown-headed cowbirds, Molothrus ater, neither desert parasitized clutches nor eject parasite eggs. We investigated whether spatial and temporal patterns of repeated cowbird parasitism on individuals influence the benefits of desertion or ejection in prothonotary wa...
Article
Forest fragmentation can create negative edge effects that reduce the reproductive success of birds nesting near the forest/nonforest interface, and threaten bird populations deeper in remnant forest habitats. Negative edge effects may be more pronounced in landscapes that are moderately fragmented, particularly where agriculture is the primary lan...
Article
Interspecific brood parasitism in birds presents a special problem for the host because the parasitic offspring exploit their foster parents, causing them to invest more energy in their current reproductive effort. Nestling brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) are a burden to relatively small hosts and may reduce fledgling quality and adult survi...
Article
The alteration and fragmentation of natural habitats has resulted in increased rates of nest predation and poor reproductive success for many bird species. The development of effec-tive conservation strategies to reduce elevated rates of nest predation has been hindered by difficulties in fully understanding mechanisms underlying patterns and rates...
Article
Avian brood parasitism often has multiple negative effects on the reproductive success of the host. Most studies have focused on one or two of these effects, but rarely have they all been studied simultaneously for one species. I studied prothonotary warblers to quantify the effects of different intensities of (i.e. multiple) brood parasitism by br...
Article
It has been suggested that prothonotary warblers, Protonotaria citrea, respond adaptively to brood parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds, Molothrus ater, even though they lack historical habitat and range overlap with cowbirds. I studied behaviours functioning as potential defences against brood parasitism in the prothonotary warbler, a cavity-nestin...
Article
I studied 787 female and 510 male Prothonotary Warblers (Protonotaria citrea) breeding in southern Illinois, USA, from 1994 to 2000 to test two competing hy-potheses that may explain between-year breeding-site fidelity in migratory birds. I exper-imentally manipulated the nesting success of randomly chosen female (n 187) and male (n 139) warblers d...
Article
Full-text available
Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
Article
A research was conducted to determine how forest fragmentation may be affecting wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) on eleven forest tracks in Berks County in southeastern Pennsylvania. A comparison was made on nest outcome for 96 wood thrush nests found on seven small forests and 75 nests found on four large forests in 1990-1991. The incidence of p...
Article
Full-text available
We characterized nest sites and compared specific nest-site characteristics to nesting success for Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) nesting in southeastern Pennsylvania in 1991. We determined if nests were placed in areas that differed from randomly selected points within a given tract of forest and compared specific nest-site characteristics f...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological effects of habitat fragmentation pose problems for birds breeding in small nature preserves. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation have been well documented in breeding birds of midwestern forests and grasslands (Robinson 1988, Robinson and Wilcove 1994, Herkert 1994, Robinson et al. 1995). Area sensitivity, the absence of birds...
Article
Full-text available
m Floodplain forests of the Central Forest Region of the Upper Midwest are found primarily on the floodplains of large rivers and include at least 12 forest cover types (species groups). Birds breeding in floodplain forests are affected by extensive variation in latitude, climate, hydrology, forest succes- sion, and change caused by anthropogenic d...
Article
Full-text available
Declines of many forest-dwelling Neotropical migrants have been attributed, in part, to fragmentation of forest habitat on the breeding grounds in North America. During 1990-1991, we determined reproductive success of Wood Thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) nest- ing within contiguous forest habitat (> 10,000 ha) and in nine forest fragments ranging i...
Article
Full-text available
Annual Report, Duration of Research: 1 May to 15 August 1999, Location of Research: Clear Springs and Bald Knob Wilderness Areas along Hutchins Creek in the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois
Article
Draft Annual Report; Duration of Research: 1 January to 15 March 1999, Location of Research: Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS), Cache River watershed, and the western Shawnee National Forest INHS Technical Report prepared for unspecified recipient
Article
Annual Report, Duration of Research: 1 May to 15 August 1999, Location of Research: The Grassy Slough Preserve (TNC), Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS), and the Heron Pond/Little Black Slough/Cache River State Natural Areas (ILDNR) of the Cache River watershed
Article
Full-text available
Copy marked "Draft", Annual Report, Duration of Research: 1 April to 15 August 1999, Location of Research: Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS), and the Cache River watershed
Article
Full-text available
Grant/Contract Number: T-48-D-001 unpublished not peer reviewed
Article
United States Fish and Wildlife Service; Cooperative Agreement Number 401818J504 unpublished not peer reviewed
Article
Birds serve as a useful group of organisms for measuring the effects and success of bottomland forest restoration activities. This presentation will highlight how restoration activities such as off-channel wetland restoration and re-forestation that reduces forest fragmentation benefit breeding birds. In addition, I will discuss how long-term songb...
Article
Full-text available
INHS Technical Report Prepared for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act Grant Program and Illinois Department of Natural Resources � State Wildlife Grant Program
Article
Full-text available
Grant/Contract No: RC08CAFWS59 INHS Technical Report Prepared for IDNR/USFWS

Network

Cited By