• Home
  • Jeffrey Grigston
Jeffrey Grigston

Jeffrey Grigston
Research Square

PhD, MBA

About

5
Publications
633
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
439
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2006 - January 2008
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 1998 - March 2006
Duke University Medical Center
Position
  • PhD Student
August 1996 - September 1998
Duke University Medical Center
Position
  • Laboratory Technician
Education
May 2011 - December 2012
Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
Field of study
  • Business Administration
September 1998 - March 2006
Duke University
Field of study
  • Pharmacology
September 1993 - December 1996
Duke University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Signal transduction typically begins by ligand-dependent activation of a concomitant partner that is otherwise in its resting state. However, in cases where signal activation is constitutive by default, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. The Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric Gα protein self-activates without accessory proteins, and is kept i...
Article
Full-text available
Plants use sugars as signaling molecules and possess mechanisms to detect and respond to changes in sugar availability, ranging from the level of secondary signaling molecules to altered gene transcription. G-protein-coupled pathways are involved in sugar signaling in plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana regulator of G-protein signaling protein 1 (AtRG...
Article
Full-text available
Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is important for cell-proliferative and glucose-sensing signal transduction pathways in the model plant organism Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRGS1 is a seven-transmembrane, RGS domain-containing protein that is a putative membrane receptor for d-glucose. Here we show, by using FRET, that d-glucose alters the interactio...
Article
Maintenance of synaptic plasticity requires protein translation. Because changes in synaptic strength are regulated at the level of individual synapses, a mechanism is required for newly translated proteins to specifically and persistently modify only a subset of synapses. Evidence suggests this may be accomplished through local translation of prot...
Article
Protein transport to and from the postsynaptic plasma membrane is thought to be of central importance for synaptic plasticity. However, the molecular details of such processes are poorly understood. One mechanism by which membrane and secretory proteins may be transported to and from postsynaptic membranes is via cargo receptors. We studied the den...

Network

Cited By