Jeffrey D. Ford

Jeffrey D. Ford
The Ohio State University | OSU · Department of Management and Human Resources

Doctor of Philosophy

About

55
Publications
55,888
Reads
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4,862
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 1983 - present
The Ohio State University
Position
  • Professor Emeritus

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
Full-text available
Despite leadership being considered essential to successful organizational change, reviews of empirical research on the subject reveal inconsistencies in the approaches to, and measurements of, both leadership and its impact on change outcomes. The study and development of leadership should reach beyond the simple focus on individual leaders and ul...
Chapter
Full-text available
Abstract We have been working together as husband and wife, as management professor and management consultant, and as co-authors for over 30 years. During that time, we have tailored an operations research-based approach to represent the operation of organizations as networks of agreements for the transfer of deliverables, e.g., products, services...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It has generally been argued that leadership is a key to successful organizational change. However, as some authors have noted, there is a dearth of empirical research regarding leadership in the conduct of change and what research does exist uses a variety of leadership types and measures, making integration of findings difficult, if not impossibl...
Article
Full-text available
It has generally been assumed that effective leadership is a key to successful change. But, as some authors have noted, there is a dearth of empirical research regarding the impact of leadership on organization change. In this chapter, we review the empirical evidence from the past 20 years in an attempt to determine the impact of leadership on the...
Article
Full-text available
When a change initiative falters, the knee-jerk response can be to blame those who won't get on board. Jeffrey Ford, of the Ohio State University, and Laurie Ford, of Critical Path Consultants, examine why that type of reaction is not only pointless but potentially destructive. Drawing on their years of research and consulting work, the authors rec...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a practical tool that managers and change agents can use to see their own conversational patterns in the management of a change, determine whether those patterns may be contributing to the progress of change, and if so, provide insights into what modifications might enhance progress. Based on the conversational model developed...
Article
Full-text available
Prevailing views of resistance to change tell a one-sided story that favors change agents by proposing that resistance is an irrational and dysfunctional reaction located "over there" in change recipients. We tell the rest of the story by proposing that change agents contribute to the occurrence of resistance through their own actions and inactions...
Article
Full-text available
Vision has been traditionally regarded as an asset to the success of organizational change. However, based on the results of a case study, Landau, Drori, and Porras propose that vision may also be a hindrance to the change process. The authors disagree. The authors contend that Landau et al. has collapsed the effects of psychological ownership and...
Article
Full-text available
Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. Accordingly, attempts are made to alter these factors in order to win support and overcome resistance. But this understanding ignores resistance as a socially constructed reality in which people are responding more...
Article
In the network of conversations that constitute the realities called organizations, the focus and unit of work in producing and managing change is conversation. This means that change agents work with, through, and on conversations to generate, sustain, and complete new conversations in order to bring about an altered network of conversations that...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores producing and managing change within conversationally constructed realities. Conversations are proposed as both the medium and product of reality construction within which change is a process of shifting conversations in the network of conversations that constitute organizations. In this context, change entails bringing new co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper proposes that organizational change can be understood as an infective process in which new conversations are introduced into an already existing network of conversations. Where these new conversations are sufficiently infective, they propagate, producing new actions, behaviors, and practices in the organization. In successful changes, th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Resistance to change has generally been understood as a result of personal experiences and assessments about the reliability of others. This paper proposes that there are three points of view which predispose people toward certain resistive behaviors and communications: complacency, resignation, and cynicism.
Article
Full-text available
The article presents a response to an earlier article published in a 1995 issue of “Academy of Management Review” from Carini, Livingstone, and Palich. The author takes issue with the authors' assertion that logics are “heuristics.” The author of this criticism claims that logics tell us what is true or real; heuristics are much more flexible. Disc...
Article
Full-text available
Most perspectives on change propose that communication occurs in the context of change. This article inverts that perspective by proposing both that communication is the context in which change occurs and that the change process unfolds in a dynamic of four distinct types of conversations. The fundamental nature of speech as performative suggests t...
Article
Full-text available
How we manage and produce organizational change is a function of the point of view we take regarding the phenomenon of change. But different points of view give us different understandings of the process. In this article, three different points of view, or logics, are presented: formal logic, dialectics, and trialectics. Although each point of view...
Article
Management educators are under increasing scrutiny and criticism for the quality of work they produce. This article proposes that to address these criticisms warrants a shift in our assumptions regarding education. In particular, a shift from the assumptions that the world is inherently ordered, that knowledge leads to action, and that action leads...
Article
Full-text available
Prevailing views of resistance to change tell a one-sided story that favors change agents by proposing that resistance is an irrational and dysfunctional reaction lo-cated "over there" in change recipients. We tell the rest of the story by proposing that change agents contribute to the occurrence of resistance through their own actions and inaction...
Article
Organizational adaptation to performance downturns has prompted numerous studies. Although these studies have focused on organizational or decision makers' characteristics influencing adaptation, neither the adaptation process nor where in the process these influences operate has been detailed. A conceptual framework for understanding adaptation to...
Article
Understanding organizations' responses to performance downturns requires understanding decision makers' attributions of causality. Drawing on Weiner's causal attribution model, this paper presents a framework for categorizing causal attributions and relates them to internal and external response strategies. Characteristics of down-turns, organizati...
Article
Current perspectives on the assessment of organization performance assume that organizations exhibit a oneness of structure and that the linkages among characteristics of organizations are rational. This paper examines the validity of these assumptions and their implications for assessing organization performance.
Article
Structural hysteresis provides a conceptual framework in which to consider relationships between organization size and structure during periods of decline. The use of this framework, as an extension of current theory, indicates that relationships between size and structure in declining organizations do not parallel those found in growing organizati...
Article
Full-text available
A direct replication of Stafford's experiment on the role of group influence on member brand preferences for bread was conducted. Findings contrary to those of Stafford were obtained, indicating that products which are low in visibility, complexity, and perceived risk and high in testability are not susceptible to group influence.
Article
A direct replication of Stafford's experiment on the role of group influence on member brand preferences for bread was conducted. Findings contrary to those of Stafford were obtained, indicating that products which are low in visibility, complexity, and perceived risk and high in testability are not susceptible to group influence.
Article
In this paper we review conceptual-theoretical issues raised by the neglect of decision-maker choice in structure-contingency models. We suggest an expansion of the structure-contingency framework to include the analysis of decision-maker(s) choice in explaining and predicting organization structure. We propose that an organization's structure is t...
Article
Full-text available
Literature pertaining to the structural influence of size, technology, and environment is reviewed. Results indicate similar structural predictions are offered by each of the three contingency variables. The roles of measurement, unit and level of analysis, variable and effect independence, and variable dominance in research inconsistencies and fut...
Article
Concepts and terms of the "operant paradigm", based on the empirical law of effect, are suggested as alternatives to the hypothetical pathgoal motivation construct which provides the major premise of the path-goal theory of leadership. Hypotheses in the path-goal theory may be explained by acognitive arguments as well. The resulting interpretation...
Article
Concepts and terms of the “operant paradigm”, based on the empirical law of effect, are suggested as alternatives to the hypothetical path-goal motivation construct which provides the major premise of the path-goal theory of leadership. Hypotheses in the path-goal theory may be explained by acognitive arguments as well. The resulting interpretation...

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Projects (5)
Archived project
Project
An examination of and reconceptualization of resistance in the conduct of change.