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Jeffery B. Cannon

Jeffery B. Cannon
The Jones Center at Ichauway

Ph.D., Plant Biology

About

36
Publications
8,747
Reads
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560
Citations
Introduction
Jeffery B. Cannon is a Forest Management Scientist at the Jones Center at Ichauway. His lab focuses on the landscape ecology of forest disturbances and restoration in pine systems of the western and southeastern U.S. His work focuses on how forest restoration in pine forests impacts spatial patterns and processes across multiple scales. Current projects include (1) understanding the program-scale impacts of restoration treatments of public restoration programs, (2) development and application of techniques for landscape-scale ecological monitoring and planning, and (3) relating changes in forest spatial patterns to environmental factors related to forest dynamics. New research in Georgia will focus on quantifying hurricane risk to forest resources through multi-scale studies of wind risk.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
Colorado State University
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2015 - August 2015
University of Georgia
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • A laboratory course focused on plant collection, identification using published flora, evolutionary relationships between plants, and floristic studies.
August 2014 - December 2014
University of Georgia
Position
  • Principles of Plant Biology Laboratory, Instructor of Record (BIOL 1108)
Description
  • An inquiry-based laboratory course for non-majors focusing on exercises in plant structure, function, and life cycles to model the scientific method. Assignments include discussions, student-designed experiments, and writing assignments.
Education
August 2011 - December 2015
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Plant Biology
August 2009 - May 2011
University of Mississippi
Field of study
  • Biological Science
August 2005 - May 2008
Mississippi State University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Context Landscape patterns created by natural disturbance such as windstorms can affect forest regeneration, carbon cycling, and other ecological processes. Objectives We develop a method for remotely measuring tornado damage severity and describe landscape-scale patterns of tornado damage. We examine the extent and distribution of damage severity...
Article
Current research on interactions between ecological disturbances emphasizes the potential for greatly enhanced ecological effects that may occur when disturbances interact. Much less attention has focused on the possibility of disturbance interactions that buffer ecological change. In this review, we discuss and classify evidence for interactions b...
Article
Full-text available
Hurricanes occur regularly along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the southern United States and can have intense ecological and economic impacts on forests. Frequent low-intensity fire plays a well-known role in many coastal plain upland forests, including longleaf pine (Pinus palustris). Hurricanes may also play a critical role in shaping these co...
Article
Full-text available
Context Several initiatives seek to increase the pace and scale of dry forest restoration and fuels reduction to enhance forest resilience to wildfire and other stressors while improving the quality and reliability of key ecosystem services. Ecological effects models are increasingly used to prioritize these efforts at the landscape-scale based on...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological studies have long examined large-scale geographic gradients in abiotic conditions and their relationship to the structure and function of ecological systems, but many critical processes in forested systems are driven by abiotic gradients that vary at fine spatial and temporal scales. To adequately characterize fine scale microclimatic va...
Article
Natural disturbance-based silviculture emphasizes harvest methods that emulate the timing and structural changes of natural disturbances. Longleaf pine woodlands are ecologically important ecosystems of the southeastern U.S. that support high biodiversity. Options for multi-aged silviculture include individual tree and group selection methods to pr...
Article
Human land use and climate change have increased forest density and wildfire risk in dry conifer forests of western North America, threatening various ecosystem services, including habitat for wildlife. Government policy supports active management to restore historical structure and ecological function. Information on potential contributions of res...
Article
Full-text available
Tree damage from a variety of types of wind events is widespread and of great ecological and economic importance. In terms of areas impacted, tropical storms have the most widespread effects on tropical and temperate forests, with southeastern U.S. forests particularly prone to tropical storm damage. This impact motivates attempts to understand the...
Article
Restoration goals in fire‐prone conifer forests include mitigating fire hazard while restoring forest structural components linked to disturbance resilience and ecological function. Restoration of overstory spatial pattern in forests often falls short of management objectives due to complexities in implementation, regulation, and available data. Wh...
Article
Full-text available
In response to large, severe wildfires across the western US, federal initiatives have been enacted to increase the pace, scale, and quality of ecological restoration in fire dependent forests. To address uncertainty and controversy in agreement among specific restoration prescriptions on national forest land, several initiatives adopt a collaborat...
Article
Full-text available
The Adaptive Silviculture for Climate Change (ASCC) network tests silvicultural treatments to promote ‘resistance’ or ‘resilience’ to climate change or speed ‘transition’ to new forest types. Based on projected increases in air temperatures and within-season dry periods in southeastern USA, we installed resistance, resilience and transition treatme...
Article
Concerns over wildfire impacts to water supplies have motivated efforts to mitigate risk by reducing forest fuels. Methods to assess fuel treatment effects and prioritise their placement are needed to guide risk mitigation efforts. We present a fuel treatment optimisation model to minimise risk to multiple water supplies based on constraints for tr...
Article
Full-text available
In fire-adapted conifer forests of the Western U.S., changing land use has led to increased forest densities and fuel conditions partly responsible for increasing the extent of high-severity wildfires in the region. In response, land managers often use mechanical thinning treatments to reduce fuels and increase overstory structural complexity, whic...
Article
Full-text available
On the Ground •Large patches of dry conifer forests have burned as high intensity crown fire, threatening life, property, and natural resources. •Conservation practices such as mechanical thinning can reduce crown fire potential while promoting other benefits such as restoring forest heterogeneity, reducing post-fire erosion risk, and improving wi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research in the central Amazon suggests that wind is a major agent of disturbance, however, a mechanistic understanding of how wind may lead to tree mortality in Amazonian forests remains unclear. Here we estimated wind speeds necessary to topple central Amazon trees by linking both static and dynamic versions of two wind speed estimation me...
Article
Concerns over wildfire impacts to water supplies have motivated efforts to mitigate risk by reducing forest fuels. Methods to assess fuel treatment effects and prioritise their placement are needed to guide risk mitigation efforts. We present a fuel treatment optimisation model to minimise risk to multiple water supplies based on constraints for tr...
Article
Many studies of ecological disturbance highlight the unexpected impact that compounded disturbances have on communities. One of the well-studied mechanisms by which forest wind and fire disturbances interact is that wind damage increases flammable fuels—amplifying the effects of fire—leading to unexpected changes in vegetation composition. However,...
Article
Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), seek to increase the pace and scale of ecological restoration. One required component of this program is collaborative adaptive management, in which monitoring data are used to iteratively evaluate and improve future management actions. Here, we assess the success of seven CFLRP treatments, implemented on 2,30...
Article
A small but growing number of watershed investment programs in the western United States focus on wildfire risk reduction to municipal water supplies. This paper used return on investment (ROI) analysis to quantify how the amounts and placement of fuel treatment interventions would reduce sediment loading to the Strontia Springs Reservoir in the Up...
Article
High descending winds generated by convective storms are a frequent and a major source of tree mortality disturbance events in the Amazon, affecting forest structure and diversity across a variety of scales, and more frequently observed in western and central portions of the basin. Soil texture in the Central Amazon also varies significantly with e...
Article
Full-text available
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of...
Chapter
Wind disturbance is one of the most prevalent natural disturbances in the Central Hardwoods Region (CHR). All ecoregions within the CHR are subject to a greater or lesser degree to tornado, derecho or thunderstorm wind damage, with an east-to-west increase in the importance of tornadoes and derechos. At the regional scale, hurricanes decrease in im...
Conference Paper
Recent studies have described the Central Amazon region as an alley of storm squall line activity. Such events can generate natural exogenous disturbance that vary in size from small clusters to many hundreds of downed hectares, frequently cited as “blowdowns”. Highly localized downburst velocities potentially exceeding 30m/s that are of short dura...
Article
Full-text available
Education costs, especially textbook prices, are outpacing inflation and becoming a serious financial burden for college students. Because student textbook use is linked to academic performance, making textbooks more affordable and accessible is one important way to enhance learning outcomes. Online booksellers allow student-to-student textbook sal...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Natural disturbances such as tornados and fire are major drivers of forest dynamics. Both the extent and pattern of damage from a single disturbance or the interaction between concurrent disturbances can influence forest recovery. Here, we report findings from two ongoing studies of forest disturbance, which lead to new...
Article
Altering the distillation times of economically important essential oils such as peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.), lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Steud.), and palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii Roxb.) oils may allow producers to increase the production, engineer the composition, and decrease the energy required for distillation. Experiments were con...
Article
Full-text available
Due in large part to fire exclusion, many oak-dominated (Quercus spp.) forests, woodlands, and savannas throughout eastern North America are being replaced by less diverse forest ecosystems. In the interior coastal plain of the southern United States, these forests are dominated in the mid- and understory by mesophytic species such as Acer rubrum L...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Classical disturbance theory predicts that most disturbances reduce the strength of biotic interactions (competition/facilitation). Most support for this prediction is based primarily on the results of removal experiments that show reduced responses of targets to neighbor removal following disturbances that are relativ...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Wind is one of the primary causes of natural disturbance in many forests. However, mechanistic understanding of wind disturbance lags far behind analogous understanding of fire as an agent of disturbance. Fundamental to a mechanistic understanding of wind effects is knowledge of the windfirmness or resistance of trees....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Large gaps created by major forest disturbances influence numerous community and ecosystem characteristics and processes. Although wind is a primary disturbance agent in many forests, only a few studies have examined landscape-scale patterns of wind damage in forests, and to date, all those have been based on damage fro...
Article
Full-text available
Stand-replacing natural disturbances in mature forests are traditionally seen as events that cause forests to revert to early stages of succession and maintain species diversity. In some cases, however, such transitions could be an artifact of salvage logging and may increase biotic homogenization. We present initial (two-year) results of a study o...
Article
Full-text available
Lemongrass [Cymbopogon flexuosus (Steud.) Wats, (syn. Andropogon nardus var. flexuosus Hack; A. flexuosus Nees)] is one of the most widely grown essential oil plants in the world. Field experiments were conducted at Verona and Poplarville, MS, to evaluate the effects of N (0, 40, 80, and 160 kg N/ha) and S (0, 30, 60, and 90 kg S/ha) on lemongrass...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Fire-maintained upland oak-pine woodlands were once common across much of the interior East Gulf Coastal Plain of the United States. However, due to fire suppression, nearly all these systems are now closed-canopy forests. The change has been so dramatic that Natureserve does not recognize oak-pine woodlands as a natura...