Jeff Kelleway

Jeff Kelleway
University of Wollongong | UOW · School of Earth Atmospheric and Life Sciences

PhD

About

67
Publications
28,196
Reads
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2,735
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2013 - December 2015
University of Technology Sydney
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2013 - March 2016
University of Technology Sydney
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
Long-phase (interannual) tidal cycles have been shown to influence coastal flooding and sedimentation, but their role in shaping the extent and condition of tidal wetlands has received little attention. Here, we show that the 18.61-year lunar nodal cycle, popularly termed the "lunar wobble," is a dominant control over the expansion and contraction...
Article
Full-text available
Restoration of coastal wetlands has the potential to deliver both climate change mitigation, called blue carbon, and adaptation benefits to coastal communities, as well as supporting biodiversity and providing additional ecosystem services. Valuing carbon sequestration may incentivise restoration projects, however, it requires development of rigoro...
Article
Full-text available
The global carbon sequestration and avoided emissions potentially achieved via blue carbon is high (∼3% of annual global greenhouse gas emissions); however, it is limited by multidisciplinary and interacting uncertainties spanning the social, governance, financial, and technological dimensions. We compiled a transdisciplinary team of experts to elu...
Article
Coastal Swamp Oak Forest (CSOF), a supratidal wetland community dominated by Casuarina glauca, is a widely distributed coastal ecosystem along Australia's east coast. These wetland communities are highly valuable for providing ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration. Positioned within the supratidal zone of estuaries – and often abutting...
Article
Full-text available
The ratio of isotopes of carbon (¹³C:¹²C or δ¹³C) and nitrogen (¹⁵N:¹⁴N or δ¹⁵N) are common indicators of the flow and storage of organic matter in coastal wetland research. Effective use of these indicators requires quantification and understanding of: (1) the variability of isotope signatures of potential organic matter source materials; and (2)...
Article
Full-text available
The development and refinement of methods for estimating organic carbon accumulation in biomass and soils during mangrove restoration and rehabilitation can encourage uptake of restoration projects for their ecosystem services, including those of climate change mitigation, or blue carbon. To support the development of a blue carbon method for Austr...
Article
Blue carbon ecosystems (BCEs), including mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and tidal marshes, store carbon and provide co-benefits such as coastal protection and fisheries enhancement. Blue carbon sequestration has therefore been suggested as a natural climate solution. In this Review, we examine the potential for BCEs to act as carbon sinks and t...
Chapter
Full-text available
Coastal Swamp Oak Forests (CSOF) dominated by the species Casuarina glauca are an Endangered Ecological Community under state and Commonwealth legislation in Australia. These forests have suffered significant historic declines due to changes in land use and hydrological modification. Although they have a limited contemporary extent (~320 to over 50...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental flow releases in lowland Australian rivers are currently timed to avoid high-carbon production on floodplains. Moreover, return flows (water draining from floodplains back into rivers) are avoided if there exists a risk of introducing deoxygenated “blackwater” into the main channel. This concern has restricted the range of possible wa...
Article
Full-text available
The scarcity of data on tidal marsh soil accumulation rates (SAR) and soil organic carbon accumulation rates (CAR) globally precludes a comprehensive assessment of the role of tidal marshes in climate change mitigation and adaptation. Particularly few data exist from the southern hemisphere and for Australia in particular, which contains ~24% of gl...
Article
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Tidal marshes rank among the ecosystems with the highest capacity to sequester and store organic carbon (Corg) on earth. To inform conservation of coastal vegetated ecosystems for climate change mitigation, this study investigated the factors driving variability in carbon storage. We estimated soil Corg stocks in tidal marshes across temperate West...
Article
Wetland ecosystems are critical to the regulation of the global carbon cycle, and there is a high demand for data to improve carbon sequestration and emission models and predictions. Decomposition of plant litter is an important component of ecosystem carbon cycling, yet a lack of knowledge on decay rates in wetlands is an impediment to predicting...
Chapter
Mangroves have shifted in position on the Australian coastline in association with sea-level fluctuations associated with climate change over a range of timescales. Relative sea-level rise following the last glacial maxima has driven mangroves across shallow continental margins punctuated by periods of relative stability and mangrove development on...
Article
Ephemeral floodplain lakes are an integral component of inland wetland ecosystems and experience highly variable hydrology and prolonged dry periods. Although wetland soil seed banks are highly resilient to drought and floods, anthropogenic land use may add an additional stress. Understanding the recovery potential of wetland soil seed banks to dif...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing interest in how the management of 'blue carbon' sequestered by coastal wetlands can influence global greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets. A promising intervention is through restoring tidal exchange to impounded coastal wetlands for reduced methane (CH 4) emissions. We monitored an impounded wetland's GHG flux (CO 2 and CH 4) prior to a...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing interest in protecting, restoring and creating ‘blue carbon’ ecosystems (BCE; mangroves, tidal marshes and seagrasses) to sequester atmospheric CO2-C and thereby contribute to climate change mitigation. While a growing number of countries aspire to report greenhouse gas emission and carbon sequestration changes from these ecosys...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our paper explores the upper thresholds of mangrove response to sea-level rise, using observations of mangrove peat formation following the last glacial period to the present.
Article
Mangroves under sea level rise The rate of sea level rise has doubled from 1.8 millimeters per year over the 20th century to ∼3.4 millimeters per year in recent years. Saintilan et al. investigated the likely effects of this increasing rate of rise on coastal mangrove forest, a tropical ecosystem of key importance for coastal protection (see the Pe...
Article
Full-text available
Mangrove ecosystems store large quantities of organic carbon for long periods of time. This study explores organic carbon stock change through the first comparative study of radiometric analysis and repeat field measures over a multi-decadal period in a mangrove system. Examining one tall gallery forest of Avicennia marina, and an adjacent interior...
Article
Full-text available
Wetlands of Melaleuca spp. in Australia form large forests that are highly threatened by deforestation and degradation. In America, Melaleuca has invaded large areas of native wetlands causing extensive damage. Despite their status as an endangered native ecosystem and as a highly invasive one, little is known about their C and N dynamics. In this...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Policies aiming to preserve vegetated coastal ecosystems (VCE; tidal marshes, mangroves and seagrasses) to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions require national assessments of blue carbon resources. Here, we present organic carbon (C) storage in VCE across Australian climate regions and estimate potential annual CO2 emission benefits of VCE conservati...
Article
Full-text available
The term Blue Carbon (BC) was first coined a decade ago to describe the disproportionately large contribution of coastal vegetated ecosystems to global carbon sequestration. The role of BC in climate change mitigation and adaptation has now reached international prominence. To help prioritise future research, we assembled leading experts in the fie...
Article
We monitored coastal wetland vertical accretion, elevation gain and surface carbon (C) at Homebush Bay, Australia over 18 years (2000-2017) in three settings initially characterized by saltmarsh, mixed saltmarsh-mangrove ecotone and mangrove-dominated zones. During this time, the saltmarsh transitioned to mixed saltmarsh-mangrove ecotone, and the m...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing interest in how the management of 'blue carbon' sequestered by coastal wetlands can influence global greenhouse gas (GHG) budgets. A promising intervention is through restoring tidal exchange to impounded coastal wetlands for reduced methane (CH4) emissions. We monitored an impounded wetland's GHG flux (CO2 and CH4) prior to and...
Article
Full-text available
Efforts to incorporate blue carbon, the carbon associated with marine ecosystems, into carbon accounting and carbon markets are increasing. To fully leverage the capacity of marine ecosystems to sequester carbon requires information to guide prioritisation of coastal landscapes for conservation and regeneration. A comprehensive landscape-scale asse...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal wetlands (mangrove, tidal marsh and seagrass) sustain the highest rates of carbon sequestration per unit area of all natural systems1,2, primarily because of their comparatively high productivity and preservation of organic carbon within sedimentary substrates³. Climate change and associated relative sea-level rise (RSLR) have been proposed...
Article
Climate change adaptation options for natural systems are particularly challenging in high density urban settings. We model the vulnerability of estuarine vegetation (mangroves, saltmarshes and Casuarina forest) to sea-level rise in Australia’s most populous city, Sydney, and conduct a detailed assessment of impacts and adaptation options for a den...
Article
In this study we compared ecosystem trophic structure between a tropical mangrove forest at Matang, Malaysia, and a temperate mangrove forest near mangrove poleward limits at Towra Point in south-east Australia. These forests are separated by 8500 km of ocean over 45° of latitude and are of contrasting size, productivity and diversity. However, we...
Article
Full-text available
In the version of this Article originally published, the potential carbon loss from soils as a result of mangrove deforestation was incorrectly given as ‘2.0–75 Tg C yr–1’; this should have read ‘2–8 Tg C yr–1’. The corresponding emissions were incorrectly given as ‘~7.3–275 Tg of CO2e’; this should have read ‘~7–29 Tg of CO2e’. The corresponding p...
Article
The ratio of stable isotopes of carbon (δ¹³C) is commonly used to track the flow of energy among individuals and ecosystems, including in mangrove forests. Effective use of this technique requires understanding of the spatial variability in δ¹³C among primary producer(s) as well as quantification of the isotopic fractionations that occur as C moves...
Article
The Australian continent spans coastal wetland settings ranging from extensive mangrove forest and sabkha plains occupying in the tropical north, to the southern half of the continent, where high wave energy constrains wetlands within numerous barrier-fronted estuaries, drowned river valleys and coastal embayments. Only on the island of Tasmania ar...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal salt marshes are dynamic, intertidal ecosystems that are increasingly being recognised for their contributions to ecosystem services, including carbon (C) accumulation and storage. The survival of salt marshes and their capacity to store C under rising sea levels, however, is partially reliant upon sedimentation rates and influenced by a co...
Article
Coastal habitats including saltmarshes and mangrove forests can accumulate and store significant blue carbon stocks, which may persist for millennia. Despite this implied stability, the distribution and structure of intertidal-supratidal wetlands is known to respond to changes imposed by geomorphic evolution, climatic, sea level and anthropogenic i...
Article
Full-text available
Mangrove soils represent a large sink for otherwise rapidly recycled carbon (C). However, widespread deforestation threatens the preservation of this important C stock. It is therefore imperative that global patterns in mangrove soil C stocks and their susceptibility to remineralization are understood. Here, we present patterns in mangrove soil C s...
Article
Salt marsh and mangrove have been recognized as being among the most valuable ecosystem types globally in terms of their supply of ecosystem services and support for human livelihoods. These coastal ecosystems are also susceptible to the impacts of climate change and rising sea levels, with evidence of global shifts in the distribution of mangroves...
Article
To promote the sequestration of blue carbon, resource managers rely on best-management practices that have historically included protecting and restoring vegetated coastal habitats (seagrasses, tidal marshes, and mangroves), but are now beginning to incorporate catchment-level approaches. Drawing upon knowledge from a broad range of environmental v...
Article
Full-text available
Australia’s tidal marshes have suffered significant losses but their recently recognised importance in CO2 sequestration is creating opportunities for their protection and restoration. We compiled all available data on soil organic carbon (OC) storage in Australia’s tidal marshes (323 cores). OC stocks in the surface 1 m averaged 165.41 (SE 6.96) M...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal saltmarshes are dynamic, intertidal ecosystems which are increasingly being recognised for their contributions to ecosystem services, including carbon (C) accumulation and storage. The survival of saltmarshes and their capacity to store C under rising sea levels, however, is partially reliant upon surface sedimentation rates and influenced...
Article
Excessive accumulation of plant ‘wrack’ on beaches as a result of coastal development and beach modification (e.g. groin installation) is a global problem. This study investigated the potential for converting beach-cast seagrass wrack into biochar as a ‘climate-friendly’ disposal option for resource managers. Wrack samples from 11 seagrass species...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Mangrove forests, tidal marshes, and seagrass ecosystems provide economic, environmental and social benefits for Australia with additional benefits being possible through their ability to capture and store carbon. A participatory stakeholder and expert workshop was conducted in Canberra on 28 July 2016 to scope potential for the inclusion of coasta...
Article
Full-text available
Although coastal vegetated ecosystems are widely recognised as important sites of long-term carbon (C) storage, substantial spatial variability exists in quantifications of these ‘blue C’ stocks. To better understand the factors behind this variability we investigate the relative importance of geomorphic and vegetation attributes to variability in...
Article
Shifts in ecosystem structure have been observed over recent decades as woody plants encroach upon grasslands and wetlands globally. The migration of mangrove forests into salt marsh ecosystems is one such shift which could have important implications for global 'blue carbon' stocks. To date, attempts to quantify changes in ecosystem function are e...
Article
Full-text available
In subtropical coastal wetlands on multiple continents, climate change-induced reductions in the frequency and intensity of freezing temperatures are expected to lead to the expansion of woody plants (i.e., mangrove forests) at the expense of tidal grasslands (i.e., salt marshes). Since some ecosystem goods and services would be affected by mangrov...
Article
Full-text available
Many marine ecosystems have the capacity for long-term storage of organic carbon (C) in what are termed 'blue-carbon' systems. While blue carbon systems (saltmarsh, mangrove and seagrass) are efficient at long-term sequestration of organic carbon (C), much of their sequestered C may originate from other (allochthonous) habitats. Macroalgae, due to...
Article
Stable isotope techniques in food web studies often focus on organic carbon in food sources which are subsequently assimilated in the tissue of consumer organisms through diet. The presence of non-dietary carbonates in bulk samples can affect their δ(13)C values, altering how their results are interpreted. Acidification of samples is a common pract...
Article
Full-text available
Riverine food webs are often laterally disconnected (i.e. between watercourses) in regulated floodplain wetlands for prolonged periods. We compared the trophic structure of benthic resources and consumers (crustaceans and fish) of the three watercourses in a regulated floodplain wetland (the Gwydir Wetlands, Australia) that shared the same source w...
Article
Full-text available
On Australian semiarid floodplains, large herbivores such as kangaroos have a role in the cycling of energy (carbon) through the mechanism of feeding and defaecation of vegetative material. The degree to which kangaroos are vectors of energy within this system is not fully understood. This study describes the stable carbon isotope signature of floo...