Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni

Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni
Universidade Federal de Pelotas | UFPEL

Professor of Ecology
Community ecologist broadly interested in species interactions. Adjunct Professor at UFPel.

About

75
Publications
40,083
Reads
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1,501
Citations
Introduction
I am a community ecologist broadly interested in species interactions. Most of my work has been on the applications of network theory and null models to investigate plant-animal interactions, especially the ones involving plants and their pollinators and seed dispersers. I have mostly investigated plant-hummingbird networks but my current research includes seed dispersal networks in novel ecosystems of Hawaii, trying to understand their structure, dynamics and stability.
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - present
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
Position
  • Research Associate
July 2020 - December 2021
University of Wyoming
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2017 - June 2020
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • Researcher
Education
November 2014 - October 2015
University of Copenhagen - CMEC
Field of study
  • Macroecology
March 2013 - February 2017
University of Campinas
Field of study
  • Ecology
March 2011 - February 2013
University of Campinas
Field of study
  • Ecology

Publications

Publications (75)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the relative importance of multiple processes on structuring species interactions within communities is one of the major challenges in ecology. Here, we evaluated the relative importance of species abundance and forbidden links in structuring a hummingbird-plant interaction network from the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil. Our results s...
Chapter
Full-text available
Most tropical plants rely on animals for pollination, thus engaging in complex interaction networks. Here, we present a global overview of pollination networks and point out research gaps and emerging differences between tropical and non-tropical areas. Our review highlights an uneven global distribution of studies biased towards non-tropical areas...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing rates of human-caused species invasions and extinctions may reshape communities and modify the structure, dynamics, and stability of species interactions. To investigate how such changes affect communities, we performed multiscale analyses of seed dispersal networks on Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi. Networks consisted exclusively of novel interactions,...
Article
Full-text available
1.Species are entangled within communities by their interactions in such a manner that their local extinction may unchain coextinction cascades and impact community dynamics and stability. Despite increasing attention, simulation models to estimate the robustness of interaction networks largely neglect the important role of interaction rewiring, i....
Article
Full-text available
Significance Species invasions and introductions are reshaping ecosystems around the world. In such novel ecological scenarios, it remains unclear whether crucial ecosystem functions played by lost native species may be partially or fully replaced by introduced species. We show that introduced plants and seed dispersers may take over interaction ne...
Article
As human-caused extinctions and invasions accumulate across the planet, understanding the processes governing ecological functions mediated by species interactions, and anticipating the effect of species loss on such functions become increasingly urgent. In seed dispersal networks, the mechanisms that influence interaction frequencies may also infl...
Article
Full-text available
In altered communities, novel species’ interactions may critically impact ecosystem functioning. One key ecosystem process, seed dispersal, often requires mutualistic interactions between frugivores and fruiting plants, and functional traits, such as seed width, may affect interaction outcomes. Forests of the Hawaiian Islands have experienced high...
Article
Analysis of ecological networks is a useful approach to investigate species interactions. However, sampling method may influence the observed patterns especially in highly diverse communities. Here we evaluated how sampling decisions influence the characterization of a seed dispersal network between frugivorous birds and plants in a Neotropical com...
Article
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While network analyses have stimulated a renewed interest in understanding patterns and drivers of specialization within communities, few studies have explored specialization within populations. Thus, in plant populations, causes and consequences of individual variation in their interactions with mutualistic animals remain poorly understood. Studyi...
Article
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Flowering plant species and their nectar-feeding vertebrates exemplify some of the most remarkable biotic interactions in the Neotropics. In the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, several species of birds (especially hummingbirds), bats, and non-flying mammals, as well as one lizard feed on nectar, often act as pollinators and contribute to seed output of...
Article
Full-text available
Fire is a frequent disturbance in most grasslands around the world, being key for the structure and dynamics of the biodiversity in such ecosystems. While grassland species may be resilient, little is known on how plant–pollinator networks reassemble after fire. Here, we investigate the structure and dynamics of plant–pollinator networks and the va...
Article
Flowering plant species and their nectar‐feeding vertebrates exemplify some of the most remarkable biotic interactions in the Neotropics. In the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, several species of birds (especially hummingbirds), bats and non‐flying mammals as well as one lizard feed on nectar, often acting as pollinators and contributing to seed output...
Article
Full-text available
Exotic species can threaten biodiversity by disrupting ecological interactions among native species. Highly-attractive exotic species can exert a ‘magnet effect’ by attracting native pollinators, which may have either competitive or facilitative effects on co-flowering native plants. However, those effects may be context-dependent. We used a mistle...
Article
Full-text available
Avian species across diverse lineages collect and incorporate mammalian hair into their nests (Tóth 2008). This widespread behavior can be adaptive, as hair, fur or wool insulates nests and so enhances nestling survival and recruitment in colder climates (Hilton et al. 2004, Mainwaring et al. 2014, Järvinen and Brommer 2020, Deeming et al. 2020; re...
Article
Full-text available
For alien invasive plant species dependent on frugivores for seed dispersal, traits that influence consumption can be important determinants of invasion and spread. However, trait comparisons between native and invasive species have documented mixed results. In Hawai‘i, one of the most invaded systems in the world, nearly all frugivory, and thus se...
Article
Full-text available
Functional traits can determine pairwise species interactions, such as those between plants and pollinators. However, the effects of biogeography and evolutionary history on trait‐matching and trait‐mediated resource specialization remain poorly understood. We compiled a database of 93 mutualistic hummingbird‐plant networks (including 181 hummingbi...
Article
Indirect interactions are central to ecological and evolutionary dynamics in pollination communities, yet we have little understanding about the processes determining patterns of indirect interactions, such as those between pollinators through shared flowering plants. Instead, research has concentrated on the processes responsible for direct intera...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of specialization and the structure of interactions between bats and ectoparasitic flies have been studied mostly on non-urban environments and at local scales. Thus, how anthropogenic disturbances influence species interactions and network structure in this system remain poorly understood. Here we investigated patterns of interaction betw...
Article
Full-text available
1. Species interact with one another in communities forming complex interaction networks which are shaped by multiple non‐exclusive processes. Although plant–hawkmoth interactions have been studied for over a century, how processes underlying species' specialisation influence community‐level patterns of niche partitioning and contribute to the emer...
Article
Full-text available
In semi-arid environments, the marked contrast in temperature and precipitation over the year strongly shapes ecological communities. The composition of species and their ecological interactions within a community may vary greatly over time. Although intra-annual variations are often studied, empirical information on how plant–bird relationships ar...
Preprint
Full-text available
Indirect interactions are central to ecological and evolutionary dynamics in pollination communities, yet we have little understanding about the processes determining patterns of indirect interactions, such as those between pollinators through shared flowering plants. Instead, research has concentrated on the processes responsible for direct intera...
Article
Full-text available
While functional traits can facilitate or constrain interactions between pair of species in ecological communities, relative abundances regulate the probabilities of encounter among individuals. However, the relative importance of traits and relative abundances for the role species play in seed dispersion networks remains poorly explored. Here, we...
Article
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Interactions between species are influenced by different ecological mechanisms, such as morphological matching, phenological overlap and species abundances. How these mechanisms explain interaction frequencies across environmental gradients remains poorly understood. Consequently, we also know little about the mechanisms that drive the geographical...
Article
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The great fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus) is a large-sized species that forages primarily on fruits. This species is widespread throughout the Neotropics, where it is common in natural areas and also occupies forest patches and cities. In this study, we review the composition of Artibeus lituratus diet in Brazil as well as the size of fruits...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of ecological specialization, the processes underlying niche partitioning and how they translate into the structure of interaction networks is a persistent challenge in ecology. Advances on this are limited by the prevalent focus on single spatial scales, lack of tests of the mechanisms underlying specialization, and scarce i...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how disturbances influence interaction networks is a central but still poorly explored issue in ecology and management. The goal of this study was to test how the structure of plant-pollinator networks and the structuring processes are influenced by grazing in a subtropical grassland community on the southern hemisphere. Twelve sampli...
Article
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Abundant pollinators are often more generalised than rare pollinators. This could be because abundant species have more chance encounters with potential interaction partners. On the other hand, generalised species could have a competitive advantage over specialists, leading to higher abundance. Determining the direction of the abundance–generalisat...
Article
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Birds, like most animals, are expected to adjust their foraging activity in response to biotic and abiotic variations to optimize energy intake and reduce costs associated with finding and ingesting food. This may lead to temporal variation in the exploitation of food resources, which has been investigated for birds of different feeding guilds but...
Article
1.Despite great interest in metrics to quantify the structure of ecological networks, the effects of sampling and scale remain poorly understood. In fact, one of the most challenging issues in ecology is how to define suitable scales (i.e., temporal or spatial) to accurately describe and understand ecological systems. 2.Here, we sampled a series of...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat loss and fragmentation typically lead to species loss and, consequently, changes in the structure and stability of interaction networks. These changes may lead to important limitation of crucial ecosystems services such as seed dispersal. Here, we compared the spatial structure and species composition of bat-fruit interaction networks in co...
Article
Full-text available
Most angiosperms rely on animals for pollination, and insects, especially bees, are the most frequent pollinators. Many native Neotropical plants are frequently visited by the invasive honeybee (Apis mellifera), but its role in the pollination of these plants has been little investigated. We assessed the contribution of various floral visitors, inc...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: We examined the effects of space, climate, phylogeny and species traits on module composition in a cross-biomes plant–hummingbird network. Location: Brazil, except Amazonian region. Methods: We compiled 31 local binary plant–hummingbird networks, combining them into one cross-biomes metanetwork. We conducted a modularity analysis and tested th...
Thesis
Full-text available
Complex networks approach has promoted fast advances in the understanding of species interactions in communities, including the description of patterns and processes structuring interactive assemblages. Despite of the accumulation of studies on plant-pollinator networks, such investigations on tropical regions are still scarce, especially on the de...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abundant pollinators are often more generalised than rare pollinators. This could be because abundance drives generalisation: neutral effects suggest that more abundant species will be more generalised simply because they have more chance encounters with potential interaction partners. On the other hand, generalisation could drive abundance, as gen...
Article
Full-text available
Pollinators may influence plant community assembly through biotic filtering and/or plant–plant competition and facilitation. The relative importance of each process, however, vary according to the scale and how strongly plants share their pollinators, and possibly in relation to the pollinator groups considered. We here investigated the assembly of...
Article
Full-text available
Latitudinal patterns of biodiversity have been studied for centuries, but it is only during the last decades that species interaction networks have been used to examine the proposed latitudinal gradient of biotic specialization. These studies have given idiosyncratic results, which may either be because of genuine biological differences between sys...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple factors drive species interactions in ecological networks, such as morphological barriers, spatio–temporal distribution, abundances and evolutionary histories of species. Novel methods are making it possible to evaluate the relative importance of each of these drivers. However, the lack of appropriate methods has prevented evaluating the e...
Article
Full-text available
Managing ecological disturbances at different spatial scales is paramount for maintaining or restoring faunal diversity in grasslands. Whereas some studies have reported varying net effects of livestock disturbance intensity upon species richness in grasslands, most analysis reveal strong effects on beta-diversity. However, beta-diversity can be fu...
Article
Full-text available
Species interact in many ways. Potentially, the type of interaction, i.e. mutualistic or antagonistic, determines the structure of interaction networks, but this remains poorly tested. Here we investigate whether epiphytes and wood decomposers, having different types of interaction with their host trees, show different network properties. We also t...
Article
Full-text available
Species co-existence depends on how organisms utilize their environment and resources. When two sympatric species are similar in some ecological requirements, their coexistence may arise from differences in resource use over time and/or space. Interactions among coexisting marsupials remain poorly understood, especially in the Neotropics. Here we c...
Data
Nestedness (NODF) and Modularity (Q) for Didelphis aurita and Metachirus nudicaudatus individual-resource networks. This is the S4 Table legend. (PDF)
Data
Frequencies of occurrence (%) of food items found in Didelphis aurita and Metachirus nudicaudatus fecal samples. This is the S1 Table legend. (PDF)
Data
Relative contribution of putative resources to the diet of Didelphis aurita and Metachirus nudicaudatus. This is the S3 Table legend. (PDF)
Data
δ13C and δ15N values for putative resources to the diet of Didelphis aurita and Metachirus nudicaudatus. This is the S2 Table legend. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Among the world’s three major nectar-feeding bird taxa, hummingbirds are the most phenotypically specialized for nectarivory, followed by sunbirds, while the honeyeaters are the least phenotypically specialized taxa. We tested whether this phenotypic specialization gradient is also found in the interaction patterns with their floral resources....
Article
Plant species within communities may overlap in pollinators’ use and influence visitation patterns of shared pollinators, potentially engaging in indirect interactions (e.g. facilitation or competition). While several studies have explored the mechanisms regulating insect-pollination networks, there is a lack of studies on bird-pollination systems,...
Article
Full-text available
Competitive pressure from invasive species tends to have a particularly strong impact on remote islands, and knowledge of such phenomena can be crucial to the conservation of endemic biodiversity. Of the two hummingbird species inhabiting Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernández Archipelago, Chile, one (Green-backed Firecrown, Sephanoides sephaniodes...
Article
Full-text available
Natural areas within cities are important as they contribute to maintain biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. In Ceará state, inventories of birds in human-impacted areas are still scarce. Here, we inventory bird species and estimate the species richness at Parque Ecológico Lagoa da Fazenda, an urban park in the municipality of Sobral, i...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical high-altitude vegetation is unique due to susceptibility to severe weather conditions in relation to lower for­mations, and by the peculiarity of its flora with many relictual components. Studies on plant-pollinator interactions in high-altitude rocky outcrops and forests of the Atlantic Forest are scarce, but compilation of information al...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To investigate the role of alien plants in mutualistic plant–hummingbird networks, assessing the importance of species traits, floral abundance and insularity on alien plant integration. Location Mainland and insular Americas. Methods We used species-level network indices to assess the role of alien plants in 21 quantitative plant–hummingbird...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographically with a high degree of community-level ecological sp...
Article
Full-text available
Hummingbirds are the most important and specialized group of pollinating birds in the Neotropics and their interactions with plants are key components to many communities. In the present study we identified the assemblage of plants visited by hummingbirds and investigated the temporal availability of floral resources in an area of restinga, sandy p...