Jef Huisman

Jef Huisman
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of Freshwater and Marine Ecology

Prof.dr.

About

264
Publications
139,189
Reads
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23,667
Citations
Introduction
Jef Huisman is head of the Department of Freshwater and Marine Ecology, University of Amsterdam. Jef does research in Aquatic Ecology, Biological Oceanography, Microbial Ecology and Theoretical Ecology, using a combination of mathematical models, laboratory experiments and field studies.
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - April 2027
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Head of Department
April 2002 - April 2017
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 1999 - March 2002
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 1986 - August 1992
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (264)
Article
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Stretching and bending vibrations of water molecules absorb photons of specific wavelengths, a phenomenon that constrains light energy available for aquatic photosynthesis. Previous work suggested that these absorption properties of water create a series of spectral niches but the theory was still too simplified to enable prediction of the spectral...
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Although environmental impacts on the biodiversity and species composition of lakes have been studied in great detail at local and regional scales, unraveling the big picture of how lake communities respond to environmental variation across large spatial scales has received less attention. We performed a comprehensive analysis to assess how the phy...
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The increased release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by algae has been associated with the fast but inefficient growth of opportunistic microbial pathogens and the ongoing degradation of coral reefs. Turf algae (consortia of microalgae and macroalgae commonly including cyanobacteria) dominate benthic communities on many reefs worldwide. Opposite...
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Phaeocystis is a globally widespread marine phytoplankton genus, best known for its colony-forming species that can form large blooms and odorous foam during bloom decline. In the North Sea, Phaeocystis globosa typically becomes abundant towards the end of the spring bloom, when nutrients are depleted and the share of mixotrophic protists increases...
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Sponges, among the oldest extant multicellular organisms on Earth,¹ play a key role in the cycling of nutrients in many aquatic ecosystems.2, 3, 4, 5 They need to employ strategies to prevent clogging of their internal filter system by solid wastes,6, 7, 8 but self-cleaning mechanisms are largely unknown. It is commonly assumed that sponges remove...
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Foraging decisions of deep-diving cetaceans can provide fundamental insight into food web dynamics of the deep pelagic ocean. Cetacean optimal foraging entails a tight balance between oxygen-conserving dive strategies and access to deep-dwelling prey of sufficient energetic reward. Risso's dolphins ( Grampus griseus ) displayed a thus far unknown d...
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A paramount challenge in coral reef ecology is to estimate the abundance and composition of the communities residing in such complex ecosystems. Traditional 2D projected surface cover estimates neglect the 3D structure of reefs and reef organisms, overlook communities residing in cryptic reef habitats (e.g., overhangs, cavities), and thus may fail...
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Applying low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to lakes is an emerging method to mitigate harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While cyanobacteria are very sensitive to H2O2, little is known about the impacts of these H2O2 treatments on other members of the microbial community. In this study, we investigated changes in microbial community compos...
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Phytoplankton form the base of marine food webs and are a primary means for carbon export in the Southern Ocean, a key area for global pCO 2 drawdown. Viral lysis and grazing have very different effects on microbial community dynamics and carbon export, yet, very little is known about the relative magnitude and ecological impact of viral lysis on n...
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Ocean acidification is expected to impact the high latitude oceans first, as CO2 dissolves more easily in colder waters. At the current rate of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, the sub-Antarctic Zone will start to experience undersaturated conditions with respect to aragonite within the next few decades, which will affect marine calcifying organisms. S...
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Oceanographic studies have shown that heterotrophic bacteria can protect marine cyanobacteria against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Could a similar interspecific protection play a role in freshwater ecosystems? In a series of laboratory experiments, we demonstrate that freshwater cyanobacteria are sensitive to H2O2 but can be...
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Shelled pteropods are widely regarded as bioindicators for ocean acidification, because their fragile aragonite shells are susceptible to increasing ocean acidity. While short-term incubations have demonstrated that pteropod calcification is negatively impacted by ocean acidification, we know little about net calcification in response to varying oc...
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Changes in the ecological stoichiometry of primary producers may have considerable implications for energy and matter transfer in food webs. We hypothesized that nutrient enrichment alters the trophic position of omnivores, as the nutritional quality of primary producers increases. This hypothesis was tested by analysing the ecological stoichiometr...
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Application of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relatively new and promising method to selectively suppress harmful cyanobacterial blooms, while minimizing effects on eukaryotic organisms. However, it is still unknown how nutrient limitation affects the sensitivity of cyanobacteria to H2O2. In this study, we compare effects of H2...
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Although cyanobacteria absorb blue light, they use it less efficiently for photosynthesis than other colors absorbed by their photosynthetic pigments. A plausible explanation for this enigmatic phenomenon is that blue light is not absorbed by phycobilisomes and, hence, causes an excitation shortage at photosystem II (PSII). This hypothesis is suppo...
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Hydropower development is the key strategy in many developing countries for energy supply, climate change mitigation, and economic development. However, it is commonly assumed that river dams retain nutrients and therefore reduce downstream primary productivity and fishery catches, compromising food security and causing transboundary disputes. Cont...
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Although phenotypic plasticity is a widespread phenomenon, its implications for species responses to climate change are not well understood. For example, toxic cyanobacteria can form dense surface blooms threatening water quality in many eutrophic lakes, yet a theoretical framework to predict how phenotypic plasticity affects bloom development at e...
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Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as an emergency method to selectively suppress cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and drinking water reservoirs. However, it is largely unknown how environmental parameters alter the effectiveness of H2O2 treatments. In this study, the toxic cyanobacterial strain Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 was treated with a ra...
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The color of many lakes and seas is changing, which is likely to affect the species composition of freshwater and marine phytoplankton communities. For example, cyanobacteria with phycobilisomes as light‐harvesting antennae can effectively utilize green or orange‐red light. However, recent studies show that they use blue light much less efficiently...
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Phytoplankton are among the smallest primary producers on Earth, yet they display a wide range of cell sizes. Typically, small phytoplankton species are stronger nutrient competitors than large phytoplankton species, but they are also more easily grazed. In contrast, evolution of large phytoplankton is often explained as a physical defense against...
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The ubiquitous chlorophyll a (Chl a) pigment absorbs both blue and red light. Yet, in contrast to green algae and higher plants, most cyanobacteria have much lower photosynthetic rates in blue than in red light. A plausible but not yet well-supported hypothesis is that blue light results in limited energy transfer to photosystem II (PSII), because...
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Niche‐based theories and the neutral theory of biodiversity differ in their predictions of how the species composition of natural communities will respond to changes in nutrient availability. This is an issue of major environmental relevance, as many ecosystems have experienced changes in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) due to anthropogenic manipul...
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In the Anthropocene, in which we now live, climate change is impacting most life on Earth. Microorganisms support the existence of all higher trophic life forms. To understand how humans and other life forms on Earth (including those we are yet to discover) can withstand anthropogenic climate change, it is vital to incorporate knowledge of the micr...
Article
Harmful cyanobacterial blooms (=cyanoHABs) are an increasing feature of many waterbodies throughout the world. Many bloom-forming species produce toxins, making them of particular concern for drinking water supplies, recreation and fisheries in waterbodies along the freshwater to marine continuum. Global changes resulting from human impacts, such a...
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The cyanobacterial iron-stress-inducible isiA gene encodes a chlorophyll-binding protein that provides flexibility in photosynthetic strategy enabling cells to acclimate to low iron availability. Here, information on the diversity and abundance of isiA genes are provided from 14 oceanic stations encompassing large natural gradients in iron availabi...
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Several studies have described that cyanobacteria use blue light less efficiently for photosynthesis than most eukaryotic phototrophs, but comprehensive studies of this phenomenon are lacking. Here, we study the effect of blue (450 nm), orange (625 nm), and red (660 nm) light on growth of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the gre...
Article
Harmful cyanobacteria producing toxic microcystins are a major concern in water quality management. In recent years, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been successfully applied to suppress cyanobacterial blooms in lakes. Physiological studies, however, indicate that microcystin protects cyanobacteria against oxidative stress, suggesting that H2O2 additi...
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Cyanobacteria can form dense and sometimes toxic blooms in freshwater and marine environments, which threaten ecosystem functioning and degrade water quality for recreation, drinking water, fisheries and human health. Here, we review evidence indicating that cyanobacterial blooms are increasing in frequency, magnitude and duration globally. We high...
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Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) limit primary production in many aquatic ecosystems, with major implications for ecological interactions in plankton communities. Yet it remains unclear how evolution may affect the N∶P stoichiometry of phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions. Here, we address this issue by analyzing an eco-evolutionary model of phyto...
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Larval release by brooding corals is often assumed to display lunar periodicity. Here, we show that larval release of individual Stylophora pistillata colonies does not comply with the assumed tight entrainment by the lunar cycle, and can better be classified as a circatrigintan pattern. The colonies exhibited three distinct reproductive patterns,...
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Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) drive major transformations in the sulfur cycle, and play vital roles in oxic-anoxic transitions in lakes and coastal waters. However, information on the succession of these sulfur bacteria in seasonally stratified lakes using molecular biological techniques is scarce. Here, we use...
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A key challenge in ecology is to understand how nutrients and light affect the biodiversity and community structure of phytoplankton and plant communities. According to resource competition models, ratios of limiting nutrients are major determinants of the species composition. At high nutrient levels, however, species interactions may shift to comp...
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Phytoplankton concentrations display strong temporal variability at different time scales. Recent advances in automated moorings enable detailed investigation of this variability. In this study, we analyzed phytoplankton fluctuations at four automated mooring stations in the North Sea, which measured phytoplankton abundance (chlorophyll) and severa...
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Although bacteria play key roles in aquatic food webs and biogeochemical cycles, information on the seasonal succession of bacterial communities in lakes is still far from complete. Here, we report results of an integrative study on the successional trajectories of bacterial communities in a seasonally stratified lake with an anoxic hypolimnion. Th...
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The daunting complexity of ecosystems has led ecologists to use mathematical modelling to gain understanding of ecological relationships, processes and dynamics. In pursuit of mathematical tractability, these models use simplified descriptions of key patterns, processes and relationships observed in nature. In contrast, ecological data are often co...
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Vocalisations form a key component of the social interactions and foraging behaviour of toothed whales. We investigated changes in calling and echolocation behaviour of long-finned pilot whales between foraging and non-foraging periods, by combining acoustic recordings and diving depth data from tagged individuals with concurrent surface observatio...
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Although regime shifts are known from various ecosystems, the involvement of microbial communities is poorly understood. Here we show that gradual environmental changes induced by, for example, eutrophication or global warming can induce major oxic-anoxic regime shifts. We first investigate a mathematical model describing interactions between micro...
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One of the major challenges in ecological stoichiometry is to establish how environmental changes in resource availability may affect both the biochemical composition of organisms and the species composition of communities. This is a pressing issue in many coastal waters, where anthropogenic activities have caused large changes in riverine nutrient...
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Many marine invertebrates provide their offspring with symbionts. Yet the consequences of maternally inherited symbionts on larval fitness remain largely unexplored. In the stony coral Favia fragum (Esper 1797), mothers produce larvae with highly variable amounts of endosymbiotic algae, and we examined the implications of this variation in symbiont...
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Traditionally, it has often been hypothesized that cyanobacteria are superior competitors at low CO2 and high pH in comparison with eukaryotic algae, owing to their effective CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM). However, recent work indicates that green algae can also have a sophisticated CCM tuned to low CO2 levels. Conversely, cyanobacteria with th...