Jed Lea-Henry

Jed Lea-Henry
Vignan University · School of Management, Humanities and Basic Sciences

About

48
Publications
19,267
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11
Citations
Citations since 2017
36 Research Items
10 Citations
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Publications

Publications (48)
Article
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The problem of ‘moral luck’ is our tendency to apply different degrees of moral blame for otherwise identical behaviours and actions. The issue is, the more you dig, the more moral luck does not resemble a bug in our reasoning, but actually a necessary and important aspect of it – moral luck is philosophically significant, but just seems like it sh...
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In July 2014, Indian news channels began reporting on the capture of the countries ‘most wanted terrorist’ – Sabyasachi Panda. As the figure head of India’s Maoist movement – a 40 year long insurgency that maintains a significant presence in 18 of India’s 29 states – Panda oversaw a wave of brazen and bloody massacres, all the while being hunted-do...
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Nietzsche’s attack on his country’s educational institutions was principally an attack on the changing face of his country’s culture. A culture that – hostile and stifling to the development of ‘genius’ – was being pushed forward by universities and schools that were increasingly looking upon education as a purely economic concern.
Thesis
Humanitarian intervention and R2P have been plagued in practice by a pervasive lack of political will to action. To overcome this situation and supply determinacy for international responses to global manifestations of mass atrocities, a two-stage approach is required. Firstly, increasing political will via the development of a new and encompassing...
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Rebelling desperately against the dying light of their usefulness, your average North Korean studies department has gradually become a hollowed-out shell of intellectualism. Atmospheres of fetid starvation where professors and researchers pick desperately over the fleshless carcasses of decades-old publications; where any depths can be plunged, and...
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The United Nations Security Council (UNSC), as the only legitimate dispenser of humanitarian intervention, has limited effectiveness due to the veto powers of the Permanent Five (P5) members. Various reform agendas have been attempted over the years, and all have failed: for the most part because any such reform would limit the current level of int...
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Review of: I Hear Your Voice , Young-Ha Kim (2017) (trans. Krys Lee) New York: Mariner Books, 272 pp., ISBN 978-0-544-32447-3, p/bk, $13.99
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Humanitarian intervention and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) are currently limited and encumbered by a pervasive absence of political will. In the calculations of states, political considerations are constantly winning-out over the moral considerations of saving at-risk segments of our planet. While institutional and legal reforms undoubtedly...
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The doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) was designed to bridge the divide between best humanitarian practice and the sovereign protection of states. Its applicability to the grave human rights abuses in North Korea, as expounded in the United Nations Commission of Inquiry report, were immediately obvious. By the letter of the doctrine,...
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Having let two people die in the past two days, you decide the next evening to skip your stroll and instead take a calming nap. After an hour or so, you are startled awake from an eventful sleepwalk. You are kneeling down beside yet another small lake, Pogge Pond, this time with no shoes in sight. Elbow deep in the water, you realise that you are h...
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Every argument turns back on America as the evil from where all other evils manifest, the pages become increasingly muddy with the authors partisanship, and the glee becomes palpable with every new call for pound-of-flesh justice. The problem slowly builds into a crescendo, on every page there is a face-value acceptance of not only grief, but of ho...
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Houellebecq always writes to a theme, as if himself addicted. And Serotonin – his latest book – embraces this addiction as closely as any other: a “small, white, scored oval tablet”, a “perfect drug, a simple, hard drug that brings no joy, defined entirely by a lack, and by the cessation of that lack”. And chasing old dragons, it starts with life a...
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Han Kang will have to be slower and less deliberate in her next book. She will have to produce something that doesn’t first require a recognition of her fame before it can draw applause. Moments of eye-opening prose are not enough to sustain the wave she is on, and it’s a game of diminishing returns. Let’s hope our punk rock band turns its back on...
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The enemies of truth and civilization are not always as clumsy and easy to spot as we might hope. Occasionally they are sophisticated – credentialed even – with long-term, war-like strategies for smearing everything that we care about. If the comfort women issue continues to be protected as sacred ground, as something that cannot be touched, someth...
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There is plenty in this book, and plenty to like. The imagery of American pilots over North Korean skies recalling “the helpless feeling of watching the huge missiles powering up into space carrying huge nuclear weapons that the pilots knew were headed toward the United States” is hauntingly well done (even if the repeated use of the word ‘huge’ st...
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There is a scene during one of their prison interviews, where the author reaches out and touches de Kock’s hand in an attempt to comfort him. Innocuous you might think, but if we are to take Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela seriously – and her constant assertions of expertise and authority – then how should we approach a claim like this: “Something odd did...
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This brings us back to Deutsch’s submarine. Embodied within all that technology, all that comfort, and all that safety, is a continuous stream of problem solving – not just problem avoidance – stretching all the way back to the enlightenment. Now we are being told that our progress is itself the problem. That we should open the hatches and shrink b...
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An open-ended stream of explanations is always available to us. The limitation is never resources (because all resources only become so by virtue of what people actually know) but only knowledge. It is never going to be pretty, but we can begin to step ourselves out of Karl Popper’s swamp, and to do so at ever greater speed. Progress of this kind i...
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Walking in from the imperial structure of the Forbidden City, with its shaded walkways and tight lanes, the change in atmosphere is sudden – like stepping out of your front door and finding yourself on the African Savanna; a pride of lions staring back at you in contemplation. It is a study in the psychological impact of space. Once through the arc...
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Across the coastlines of western Japan, starting in the 1970’s, a terrifying horror story was playing out. Lone fishermen weren’t coming home, women out on regular evening walks were lost forever, and young lovers were disappearing; engines still idling in their abandoned cars. Many of the vanished were dismissed as runaways, people deserting unwan...
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“For my father (1928 - )” reads Michael Pembroke’s brief dedication, “who was there”. It is a raw, honest and principled motivation for writing a book… but not an intellectual one. ‘Korea: Where the American Century Began’, teases to do something impressive, but finds itself stuck in this first sentence; unable to kick free from the author’s antipa...
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More than just unfettered access to the leader of North Korea, Yo-jong could, quite conceivably – considering some of the recent social changes inside her country – be next in line for succession if something were to happen to her brother. As close as she is to Kim Jong-un, this must also worry her. In her short adult life, Yo-jong has witnessed a...
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Through the circus of it all, and the Machiavellian fear, Yo-jong had lost one of the last remaining certainties in her life. The people that ‘shared’ her social circle, were always coming-and-going. Exile assassination, even defection was common – her aunt defected in 1998 – but for a child that had spent so much of her life in isolation, only eve...
Presentation
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This episode of the Korea Now podcast features an interview that Jed Lea-Henry conducted with Terence Roehrig. They speak about the Cold War origins of America’s nuclear umbrella, how this nuclear deterrent relates to South Korea, the history of American nuclear weapons on the Korean peninsula, how the nuclear umbrella is seen inside South Korea, t...
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The memory of the famine still haunts North Korea – the hills of every town, including Pyongyang, are littered with the graves of those who starved to death. At the same time, the regime looks no more likely to collapse than it has before. Across the country monuments to the Kim dynasty still stand, and are being added to daily. Even though state i...
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After enough people had died, and there was finally enough food to go around, North Koreans moved-on and quietly left the potato revolution behind them. And the propaganda followed. The imagery stopped, the film industry moved on to new things. But the lasting impact wouldn’t be insignificant. North Korean propaganda had road-tested a range of new...
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The Responsibility to Protect (R2P) was created in the hope of overcoming the barrier that state sovereignty, as a principle, had become to actions of humanitarian intervention. It was imagined that as mass atrocity crimes were coming to the attention of the international community, that, on the whole, they were willing, able and eager to intervene...
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Like other types of humanitarian intervention before it, the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) has suffered in practice from a pervasive lack of political will. This represents a failure of moral motivation, but also a failure to accept the often steep political, material and human costs associated with intervening to try and halt mass atrocity crime...
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The ‘model’ presented in ‘North Korean House of Cards”, is a theory in search of information to fit it. Something Gause himself alludes to when leveraging the importance of Jang Song-taek’s execution: “there is very little evidence” and “parts of what is presented in this study is a snapshot in time that may not be grounded in truth”. But if we ign...
Presentation
Interviewing academics, professionals and other experts, Korea Now is a podcast where Jed Lea-Henry digs into historical and current issues relating to the two Korea’s. Jed Lea-Henry's podcast can be found at: * Libsyn - http://korea-now-podcast.libsyn.com/ * Website – http://www.jedleahenry.org * YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P...
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Abdullah Azzam strategized right up until his death. He was always plotting a future for his faith that would be defined by violence – “Palaces of glory are built only by skulls and limbs severed from the body”....“The tree of this religion is watered only with blood”. In the same month that he was killed, a terrorist organisation was formed, and i...
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As counterintuitive as it might sound, ‘sustainability’ and the commitment to ‘problem avoidance’ rather than ‘problem solving’ are, at least according to David Deutsch, very dangerous ideas. And in this regard, our near-universally pursued policy direction in response to the problem of global warming – that of trying to limit carbon emissions by m...
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Indian Maoism – or Naxalism as it has come to be called – is the largest terrorist movement in India today. Built upon layers of political, social and economic grievance, it is an insurgency that has gripped the country since independence. But although Maoism may have had its origins fighting against injustice, it has since evolved into a predatory...
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In the centre of Pyongyang, as a monument to the Great Leader, Kim Il Sung, stands the Juche Tower – a 150 metre high red flame, reaching into the sky. But, as it now hangs gangrenously from its Songun host, Juche, as an ideology, is dead! And just as with the communist insignia before it, the tower will likely be removed at some future date, in th...
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There just isn’t a ‘nausea’ at the heart of life – as Sartre described it – driving people ever closer to the roof’s edge. ‘Meaning’ – as it so happens – has a rather unsexy, sober backstory: apparently it’s just a process of finding challenges, creating knowledge and solving problems.
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A pioneer in the fields of quantum computation and the many universes interpretation of quantum mechanics, David Deutsch thinks that we have it all wrong on climate change. Not the science! He agrees with the consensus regarding our CO2 admissions and the warming of our planet. But when it comes to the philosophical implications of that scientific...
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The Bhagavad Gita, a central Hindu text, is a metaphysical mess of divine revelation, spiritualism and cosmic guesswork; it is religion masquerading as philosophy. For the Bhagavad Gita to survive we will have to accept that it is a document of a different age; that its undiluted message is at both one and the same time, meaningless and immoral. Fr...
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To ask that people actively avoid fame is almost certainly a hopeless argument. It is just too deep in our DNA, it strokes our ego in just the right way, it pushes us to the top of social hierarchies and it represents the perfect revenge story against anyone who has ever belittled us. The eyes of other people are just too addictive – we will always...
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The decision to try and militarily protect at-risk segments of humanity should ordinarily be a public relations boon for any given government or institution. Yet from that moment in Somalia, and up until the present crisis in Syria, the principle of humanitarian intervention has been accompanied by a malaise of inconsistent, and often contradictory...
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The sheer fact that we are not talking about it means that it has died! With all the harm that we are currently seeing in Syria and Iraq, the Doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect – or R2P – should be rolling off our tongues daily, and should be echoing in the language of our politicians. In the absence of such a prominent role, it is now incre...
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The Armenian genocide has set a dangerous international standard: that is, the worst human rights violations, the most significant breaches of our collective conscience, and the most unimaginable crimes can all be forgotten if only the perpetrators are committed to expunging them from history. As long as the Armenian genocide remains forgotten, and...
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We all intuitively expect to be held entirely responsible for any crime that we knowingly committed, regardless of how many perpetrators knowingly committed it with us. Criminal responsibility simply does not diminish according to criminal companionship. We do not teach our children that if they are going to harm other people, then it is better tha...

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