Jed Jerwood

Jed Jerwood
University of Birmingham · Institute of Clinical Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

11
Publications
1,670
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13
Citations
Introduction
I am a post-doctoral clinical academic. My clinical work as an HCPC registered Art Psychotherapist is with adults with severe and enduring mental ill health, clinical supervision and training. My research interests are in improving palliative and end of life care for people with mental illnesses and incurable physical conditions; in marginalisation within healthcare; visual and creative methods; co-design and co-creation methods; healthcare education and staff development.

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Background and Aim: People with severe mental illness (SMI) have a life expectancy of up to twenty years less than the general population and many live with incurable physical health conditions. Yet, they continue to experience barriers when trying to access palliative and end of life care (PEOLC). Little research has been carried out which include...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background People with severe mental illness (SMI) have a life expectancy of up to twenty years less than the general population. They also experience poor physical health and higher rates of many life-limiting conditions. Research on the specific needs of people with SMI in palliative and end of life care is extremely limited and focuses on descri...
Article
Full-text available
Clinical academic careers programmes have developed in England and Wales to enable clinical staff outside of medical and dentistry-namely Nurses, Midwives, Allied Health Professionals, Pharmacists and Healthcare Scientists (NMAHPPS) to develop their academic and research skills alongside clinical practice. These schemes have complemented pre-existi...
Thesis
Background People with severe mental illness (SMI) have a life expectancy of up to twenty years less than the general population which is one of the biggest health inequalities in the UK. People with SMI and terminal illnesses also face multiple barriers, including stigma and prejudice from clinical staff, when accessing palliative and end of life...
Poster
The first study reporting the views of patients (and their carers) with severe mental illness and terminal conditions on palliative and end of life care
Conference Paper
Background Research which concerns the experiences and expectations of people with mental illnesses and terminal conditions is extremely limited both in the UK and internationally. What is known is that people with mental ill health experience higher rates of many physical health issues, later diagnosis and poorer prognosis than the general popula...
Article
Full-text available
Adults with severe mental illness (SMI) experience higher rates of physical ill health and have a life expectancy 10–20 years lower than that of the general population.¹ They are also more likely to live in poverty, to live in poor housing or be homeless, and find it harder to stay in employment than the general population. People with SMI also exp...
Conference Paper
Background People with mental illness experience higher rates of many life-limiting conditions and die on average twenty years earlier than the general population. A literature review was carried out which revealed limited understanding of the end of life needs of this patient group. The role of clinical staff was highlighted as a key factor, yet t...
Thesis
People with mental illness experience higher rates of many life-limiting conditions and die on average twenty years earlier than the general population. The researcher observed that people with mental illness appeared to be under-represented in hospice care. A literature review was carried out which revealed limiting research concerning the end of...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Exploring the ethical use of film with potentially vulnerable participant groups A project enabling patients at John Taylor Hospice to make films about their experiences of terminal illness www.lifemoving.org