Jeanne Robertson

Jeanne Robertson
California State University, Northridge | CSUN · Department of Biology

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38
Publications
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Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Abstract Identifying how natural (i.e., unaltered by human activity) and anthropogenic landscape variables influence contemporary functional connectivity in terrestrial organisms can elucidate the genetic consequences of environmental change. We examine population genetic structure and functional connectivity among populations of a declining specie...
Article
Investigating the spatial distribution of genetic and phenotypic variation can provide insights into the evolutionary processes that shape diversity in natural systems. We characterized patterns of genetic and phenotypic diversity to learn about drivers of color-pattern diversification in red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas) in Costa Rica. Al...
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Island populations are at higher risk of extinction than mainland populations. Therefore, understanding the factors that facilitate connectivity is particularly pressing for the conservation of island taxa. Sceloporus occidentalis becki, the Island Fence Lizard, is an endemic taxon restricted to the Northern Channel Islands, part of a nearshore arc...
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Investigating the spatial distribution of genetic and phenotypic variation can provide insights into the evolutionary processes that shape diversity in natural systems. We characterized patterns of genetic and phenotypic diversity to learn about drivers of color-pattern diversification in red-eyed treefrogs ( Agalychnis callidryas ) in Costa Rica....
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Hybrid zones act as natural laboratories where divergent genomes interact, providing powerful systems for examining the evolutionary processes underlying biological diversity. In this study, we characterized patterns of genomic and phenotypic variation resulting from hybridization between divergent intraspecific lineages of the Neotropical red-eyed...
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The Central American red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) is a nocturnal/crepuscular frog that exhibits high population-level phenotypic variation in a suite of traits generally important in anuran communication. Females of this species demonstrate a preference for local over non-local males, although the contribution of different communicatio...
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Comparative landscape genetics has uncovered high levels of variability in which landscape factors affect connectivity among species and regions. However, the relative importance of species traits vs. environmental variation for predicting landscape patterns of connectivity is unresolved. We provide evidence from a landscape genetics study of two s...
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Premating reproductive isolation (RI) may reduce gene flow across populations that have differentiated in traits important for mate choice. Examining RI across genetic and phenotypic clines can inform the fundamental evolutionary processes that underlie population and lineage differentiation. We conducted female mate-choice studies across an intras...
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Geographic variation in courtship behavior can affect reproductive success of divergent phenotypes via mate choice. Over time, this can lead to reproductive isolation and ultimately to speciation. The Neotropical red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) exhibits high levels of phenotypic variation among populations in Costa Rica and Panama, includ...
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Fire regimes influence natural populations of organisms in diverse ways, via direct effects on population dynamics as well as indirect effects on habitat and ecosystem processes. Although many amphibian species have evolved to persist in fire-dependent ecosystems, the effects of fire on the genetic diversity of amphibian populations remain relative...
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Some nocturnal animals are brightly marked, yet the adaptive significance of their colourful patterns in low light is poorly understood, and this phenomenon is particularly prevalent in amphibians. One way to resolve this seeming paradox is to determine whether these colour patterns serve as visual cues that evolve through sexual and/or natural sel...
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Background The non-lethal collection of sperm from live males is an important component for multiple captive-breeding techniques, including assisted reproductive technology (ART) protocols, sperm cryopreservation and in vitro fertilization. However, in amphibians, the type and amount of hormone necessary to induce spermiation can be highly variable...
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Patterns of phenotypic variation across a geographic range provide important insights into evolutionary processes underlying diversification and speciation. Most evolutionary studies use putatively neutral markers to examine evolutionary diversification. However, functional phenotypes such as gene-encoded host-defense polypeptides (HDPs) could prov...
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For closely related species, differences in morphology can provide insight into the evolutionary history of a taxonomic group, as well as mechanisms for ecological segregation. Storm-petrels are among the smallest seabirds, and their greatest taxonomic diversity occurs in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Some storm-petrels exhibit a unique foraging behav...
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Premating behavioural isolation can facilitate divergence among natural populations. The red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) exhibits a strong population genetic structure that coincides with geographical differentiation in colour pattern and body size. We examined assortative mating for local males in two geographically isolated populations...
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Amphibian species persisting in isolated streams and wetlands in desert environments can be susceptible to low connectivity, genetic isolation, and climate changes. We evaluated the past (1900–1930), recent (1981–2010), and future (2071–2100) climate suitability of the arid Great Basin (USA) for the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) and ass...
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We examined the contemporary genetic structure of the barred sand bass, Paralabrax nebulifer, a commonly fished species in southern California and Baja California, Mexico. Populations of barred sand bass in southern California have experienced severe declines in numbers over the last decade subsequently leading to severely depressed status of the r...
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Islands host exceptionally high levels of endemism compared to mainland regions and are subject to disproportionately high rates of extinction and imperilment. Therefore, the protection and preservation of taxonomic units that are endemic to islands is a key component in mitigating the loss of global biodiversity. However, determining what is “ende...
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Speciation can proceed rapidly when natural and sexual selection act in concert. For example speciation can be accelerated when traits that confer a selective advantage in a particular habitat also influence mate preference. Studying parallel but evolutionarily independent instances of ecological divergence can illuminate the interaction between na...
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Ecological opportunity is any change that allows populations to escape selection from competition and predation. After encountering ecological opportunity, populations may experience ecological release: enlarged population size, broadened resource use, and/or increased morphological variation. We identified ecological opportunity and tested for eco...
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Aim Understanding the patterns and processes underlying phenotype in a polytypic species provides key insights into microevolutionary mechanisms of diversification. The red-eyed treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas, exhibits strong regional differentiation in colour pattern, corresponding to five admixed mitochondrial DNA clades. We evaluated spatial di...
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Colonization of novel habitats is often associated with differences in ecological community composition. For small diurnal animals, differences in predator diversity and abundance can lead to behavioural shifts in the novel habitat. The eastern fence lizard Sceloporus undulatus (Bosc and Daudin, 1801) recently colonized the gypsum dunes of White Sa...
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The evolution of intersexual interactions, like mate choice, during ecological speciation has received widespread attention. However, changes in intrasexual interactions, like male territoriality, during ecological divergence are largely unexamined. We conducted field experiments with adaptively diverged populations of the eastern fence lizard (Sce...
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Ecological opportunity--through entry into a new environment, the origin of a key innovation or extinction of antagonists--is widely thought to link ecological population dynamics to evolutionary diversification. The population-level processes arising from ecological opportunity are well documented under the concept of ecological release. However,...
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Animal social signals are important for population recognition, communication, and mate choice. Although natural selection often favours cryptic coloration, sexual selection can underlie patterns of coloration that function in inter- or intrasexual communication. We compared social signal coloration of three lizard species across a substrate colour...
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Spatial patterns of heritable phenotypic diversity reflect the relative roles of gene flow and selection in determining geographic variation within a species. We quantified color differentiation and genetic divergence among 20 populations of the red-eyed tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) in lower Central America. Phylogenetic analyses revealed 5 we...
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Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation in morphology and behaviour, when examined in a phylogenetic context, can provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving population divergence and ultimately speciation. In the present study, we quantified behavioural and phenotypic variation among populations from genetically divergent r...
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Based on population genetic theory and empirical studies of small populations, we expect that species with very small ranges (narrow endemics) will exhibit reduced genetic diversity, increasing their susceptibility to the negative effects of genetic homogeneity. Although this pattern of reduced diversity applies to most narrow endemics, conservatio...
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Comparative studies of codistributed taxa test the degree to which historical processes have shaped contemporary population structure. Discordant patterns of lineage divergence among taxa indicate that species differ in their response to common historical processes. The complex geologic landscape of the Isthmus of Central America provides an ideal...
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Dispersal capabilities determine and maintain local gene flow, and this has implications for population persistence and/or recolonization following environmental perturbations (natural or anthropogenic), disease outbreaks, or other demographic collapses. To predict recolonization and understand dispersal capacity in a stream-breeding frog, we exami...
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Aim Studies of the spatial and temporal patterns of phenotypic diversity help to elucidate the fine-scale evolutionary and ecological mechanisms underlying geographical differentiation. The red-eyed tree frog, Agalychnis callidryas, is a widespread Neotropical frog that exhibits a broad range of polymorphism of coloration and flank-stripe pattern....
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We used mitochondrial DNA sequence comparisons to assess range-wide population structure and historical patterns of differentiation among populations of the bog turtle (Glyptemys muhlenbergii). This species is one of North America’s smallest and most endangered pond turtles, and is currently found in three largely disjunct groups of populations: in...
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Molecular diagnostic tests provide valuable information for conservation management, but those involving multiple steps are unduly laborious for the analysis of large numbers of samples. Fortunately, PCRs can be designed to detect diagnostic polymorphisms directly. Three salmon species, coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch), chinook (O. tshawytscha) and stee...

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Project (1)
Project
Field studies of vertebrates, mostly fishes, reptiles, and birds, with major interest in symbioses (in a broad sense) and other association types, feeding behavior, faunistic, urban species.