Jeanne Hurlbert

Jeanne Hurlbert
Louisiana State University | LSU · Department of Sociology

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56
Publications
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3,679
Citations

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Background context Emergent surgery for patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is seen as the gold standard in acute management. However, optimal treatment for those with the clinical diagnosis of central cord syndrome (CCS) is less clear and classic definitions of CCS do not identify a unique population of patients. Purpose To test th...
Article
Full-text available
Study design: Retrospective analysis of a prospective registry and surgeon survey. Objectives: To identify surgeon opinion on ideal practice regarding the timing of decompression/stabilization for spinal cord injury and actual practice. Discrepancies in surgical timing and barriers to ideal timing of surgery were explored. Setting: Canada. Me...
Article
Full-text available
Development of a prospective patient registry. To develop a patient registry for persons with traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCI), which can be used to answer research questions and improve patient outcomes. Nine provinces in Canada. The Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) is part of the Translational Research Program of the Rick Hans...
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Research on why neighborhood disadvantage matters for health focuses on the capacity of neighborhoods to regulate residents' behavior through informal social control. The authors extend this research by conducting a multilevel analysis of data from a 1995 telephone survey of 497 residents of 32 neighborhoods in a U.S. city. The authors find that ne...
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Abstract As they examine the complex issues currently facing rural America, rural sociologists draw increasingly on studies of community attachment. Because this research tradition has established the superiority of the systemic model, recent studies in rural and urban settings have focused on the conceptualization and operationalization of its com...
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Abstract To revisit the rural-urban contrast, we use data from non-metropolitan and metropolitan subsamples of the 1985 General Social Survey to test whether, compared to personal networks in urban settings, personal networks in rural settings contain ties of greater intensity and role multiplexity, are based more on kinship and neighborhood solida...
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Although previous research demonstrated that networks matter for health-related outcomes, few studies have investigated the possibility that network effects may differ between women and men. In a multivariate regression analysis of a US sample of 548 hurricane victims, we ask whether effects of network composition, density, and size affect perceive...
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Although numerous systems have been proposed, there is no universally accepted classification or scoring system for thoracolumbar spine injuries. Some have gained popularity, but most systems have never been modified or advanced beyond their initial introductory state. To the authors' knowledge, no thoracolumbar classification system has ever been...
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A new classification and treatment algorithm for thoracolumbar injuries was recently introduced by Vaccaro and colleagues in 2005. A thoracolumbar injury severity scale (TLISS) was proposed for grading and guiding treatment for these injuries. The scale is based on the following: 1) the mechanism of injury; 2) the integrity of the posterior ligamen...
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Study Design. A new proposed classification system for thoracolumbar (TL) spine injuries, including injury severity assessment, designed to assist in clinical management. Objective. To devise a practical, yet comprehensive, classification system for TL injuries that assists in clinical decision-making in terms of the need for operative versus nonop...
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Transoral decompression of the cervicomedullary junction may be compromised by a narrow corridor in which surgery is performed, and thus the adequacy of surgical decompression/resection may be difficult to determine. This is problematic as the presence of spinal instrumentation may obscure the accuracy of postoperative radiological assessment, or t...
Article
Despite the long-standing interest of sociologists in the impact of social structure on the psychological well-being of individuals, the structural contexts of the support process remain understudied. To begin to fill this gap, some support researchers have used social statuses to tap location in the social structure. Others have analyzed the inter...
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Full-text available
Because transoral decompression of the cervicomedullary junction is compromised by a narrow surgical corridor, the adequacy of decompression/resection may be difficult to determine. This is problematic as spinal hardware may obscure postoperative radiological assessment, or the patient may require reoperation. The authors report three patients in w...
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Traditionally, odontoid fractures have been treated with different bracing techniques resulting in variable degrees of successful healing. Surgical intervention is becoming more widely practiced as a primary intervention. The purpose of this report was to survey our recent experience in southern Alberta to determine potential outcome differences in...
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Social resources research has linked activated ties to outcomes-but not to the core networks from which the ties came. This study shifts the focus to the question of how networks allocate resources. The activation of core network ties is analyzed in a nonroutine situation-a hurricane-to determine how core network structure affects the degree to whi...
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An in vitro study compared the biomechanics of the upper cervical spine among three groups of cadaveric specimens, each with a different source of instability: transverse-alar-apical ligament disruptions, odontoid fractures, or odontoidectomies. The responses of the three groups were again compared after a uniform posterior cable and graft fixation...
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Pain control can often be improved by local (as opposed to systemic) application of analgesic and/or anesthetic medication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a single-dose epidural analgesic "paste" in the control of postoperative pain in patients who have undergone lumbar decompressive surgery. Sixty patients undergoing rou...
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Object. Pain control can often be improved by local (as opposed to systemic) application of analgesic and/or anesthetic medication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a single-dose epidural analgesic “paste” in the control of postoperative pain in patients who have undergone lumbar decompressive surgery. Methods. Sixty patien...
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The purpose of this study was to compare cable techniques used in occipitocervical fixation with two types of screw fixation. The authors hypothesized that screw fixation would provide superior immobilization compared with cable methods. Ten cadaveric specimens were prepared for biomechanical analyses by using standard techniques. Angular and linea...
Article
This 44-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of progressive spastic weakness of his legs. He was found to have epidural lipomatosis behind the thoracic spinal cord, and the nerve roots exited from the posterior and anterior midline planes of the dura, indicating a 90° rotation of the thoracic cord. Magnetic resonance images clearly demonstr...
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We address a neglected issue in the literature on social resources by asking how one aspect of the context of searcher-contact ties, shared membership in voluntary organizations, affects social resources and, through them, job search outcomes. We also ask whether these effects differ by gender. Our results show that using a contact with whom a job...
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To explore the determinants of support provision in the natural disaster context, we followed House (1981) and developed a model that specifies how characteristics of the providers, their personal networks, and the community contexts in which they live facilitate or impede their ability to provide support. All three sets of factors affected support...
Article
The social support strand of network analysis has confirmed the importance of taking seriously the personal network context in studies of informal support. But, as recent reviews make clear, it has paid relatively little attention to other situational contingencies that may influence flows of informal support. To begin to fill this gap, we draw on...
Article
Study Design This is a report of a prospective case series. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether evoked potential activity recorded from occipital scalp electrodes in humans is similar to that recorded in animals, and to evaluate the independence of this activity from the classical somatosensory-evoked potential. Summary of...
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The purpose of this experiment was to characterize the longitudinal field gradients from exogenously applied electrical stimulation in the normal and injured rodent spinal cord. In addition, we compared the field gradients arising from stimulation with two different types of stimulating electrodes. Twenty normal rats underwent the surgical implanta...
Article
THE PURPOSE OF this experiment was to characterize the longitudinal field gradients from exogenously applied electrical stimulation in the normal and injured rodent spinal cord. In addition, we compared the field gradients arising from stimulation with two different types of stimulating electrodes. Twenty normal rats underwent the surgical implanta...
Article
Electrical stimulation of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) can result in extensive destruction of tissue unless applied within specific stimulation parameters. Classically, unbalanced or monopolar currents have been avoided in order to minimize these harmful effects. However, direct current (DC) fields have recently been proposed for the...
Article
A 38-year-old woman with thrombosis of the deep cerebral venous system, presumed to be secondary to the use of the oral contraceptive pill, is reported. The use of cerebral angiography and magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and management strategies is discussed. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging is an appropriat...
Article
The purpose of this investigation was to develop a reliable method for in vivo mapping of small exogenously applied electrical fields in the mammalian spinal cord. Experiments were performed in vitro to validate the technique in addition to recordings made in vivo on normal and spinal cord injured rats. Sine waves of 1.5-50 microA and 0.5-50 Hz wer...
Article
The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of ascending sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in the rat and their capacity for selective monitoring of dorsal versus ventral spinal cord integrity. SEPs were elicited by direct sciatic nerve stimulation. A cerebellar evoked response was recorded over the paramedian lobule of the cerebellar hemisp...
Article
The inclusion of network concepts in the stress-distress model of health represents a major theoretical advance. Most researchers use the dyadic approach of social network analysis to construct network measures of social support. Working from the argument that network structure and social support are conceptually and empirically distinct, we extend...
Article
Although the assessment of spinal cord function by electrophysiological techniques has become important in both clinical and research environments, current monitoring methods do not completely evaluate all tracts in the spinal cord. Somatosensory and motor evoked potentials primarily reflect dorsal column and pyramidal tract integrity, respectively...
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This paper tests the proposition that social networks serve as a social resource which affects job satisfaction through the provision of social support. Drawing from the literature on job satisfaction and social support, the author argues that three types of networks are likely to affect job satisfaction: dense networks, social circles composed of...
Article
The relationship between occupational stress, social support, and strain was investigated in a series of influential studies in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This continues to provide the most consistent support for the buffer hypothesis in the stress-strain literature. The authors argue that this support is more tenuous than it appears because t...
Article
The present paper summarizes our experience with the use of motor evoked potentials (MEP) and cerebellar evoked potentials (CEP) to assess the physiological integrity of the motor tracts of the spinal cord in a rat model. The MEP elicited by intracortical microstimulation of motor cortex reflected activity only in the pyramidal tracts; in contrast...
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We review research on egocentric networks to show how network analysis provides both a distinctive perspective and a methodology for studying the family. In this perspective, individuals are influenced by social networks but are also active agents in their creation. We describe such key concepts as density, range, size, homogeneity and homophily. W...
Article
Analysts use a variety of indicators to assess whether the South remains a distinctive cultural region, and reach different conclusions. This analysis examined the distinctiveness of the South by comparing the attitudes and beliefs of Southerners to those of non-Southerners. A group of characteristics thought to be distinctively Southern was select...
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We replicate and extend studies of job-matching by Lin, Ensel, and Vaughn (1981) and Bridges and Villemez (1986), concentrating on the effects of social network resources on the following outcomes of job-changes: occupational prestige, wages, industrial sector, firm size, possession of authority, and closeness of supervision. Our replication confir...
Article
Selectivity bias is a danger whenever observations are systematically excluded from a data set on the basis of a dependent variable, whether this exclusion is explicit or implicit. If present, the problem has severe consequences for the validity of statistical estimates of effects. The problem is of importance to the analysis of survey network data...
Article
In 1939, Carl Hovland and Robert R. Sears presented data that they believed linked fluctuations in the price of cotton to lynchings in the South, a linkage first suggested six years earlier by Arthur Raper. This correlation quickly became a popular illustration of frustration-aggression theory. A few years later, a statistical critique by Alexander...
Article
We address two questions central to the "network as resources" argument, using network data from two mass surveys. First, how is range best measured? We identify six dimensions of range: one each reflecting network size and complexity, and two each representing density and diversity. Second, what is the nature of the relationship between SES and so...
Article
Thesis (M.A.)--University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 61-62).

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