Jeanine M. Rhemtulla

Jeanine M. Rhemtulla
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Dept. Forest & Conservation Sciences

PhD

About

53
Publications
31,782
Reads
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2,140
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2009 - June 2014
McGill University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2002 - February 2007
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Ensuring the long‐term persistence of tropical forest restoration projects is vital to maintaining carbon stocks, biodiversity, and other benefits of restored ecosystems. But our understanding of the factors that determine restoration longevity – the age that a restored ecosystem attains before being converted to another land use – is limited, and...
Article
Forests have re-taken centre stage in global conversations about sustainability, climate and biodiversity. Here, we use a horizon scanning approach to identify five large-scale trends that are likely to have substantial medium- and long-term effects on forests and forest livelihoods: forest megadisturbances; changing rural demographics; the rise of...
Article
Humanity places a heavy burden on agricultural landscapes, demanding plentiful food, multiple ecosystem functions, and biodiversity conservation. We quantified areas growing ‘brighter’ and ‘darker’ (i.e., better or worse than expected based on extrinsic constraints) for multifunctionality of ecosystem services (ES) over time across a dynamic agricu...
Article
Full-text available
Malnutrition linked to poor quality diets affects at least 2 billion people. Forests, as well as agricultural systems linked to trees, are key sources of dietary diversity in rural settings. In the present article, we develop conceptual links between diet diversity and forested landscape mosaics within the rural tropics. First, we summarize the sta...
Article
Full-text available
Dietary diversification is central to improving dietary quality and nutrition for food security. Several factors have been linked to higher diversity diets, including household wealth, market access, on-farm crop diversity, and regional forest cover. How these factors combine in landscapes to shape diets, however, is not well-understood. We take th...
Article
Full-text available
Forests across the world stand at a crossroads where climate and land-use changes are shaping their future. Despite demonstrations of political will and global efforts, forest loss, fragmentation, and degradation continue unabated. No clear evidence exists to suggest that these initiatives are working. A key reason for this apparent ineffectiveness...
Preprint
Full-text available
Forests across the world stand at the crossroad with climate and land use changes shaping their future. Despite the demonstration of political will and global efforts, forest loss, fragmentation and land degradation continue unabated. No clear evidence exists that these initiatives are working. Why are policies designed to halt deforestation and in...
Article
Full-text available
Across the tropics, in both forested and agricultural landscapes, many households are highly dependent on forest resources. Small-holder farmers, many with few alternatives, collect fuelwood, building materials, wild foods, medicinal plants, and other forest products for subsistence or sale. Given continued tropical forest loss coupled with househo...
Article
Food forests are burgeoning in urban areas of Northern America and Europe. A growing body of scientific literature is addressing the potential of urban food forests for improving and/or diversifying ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity. However, this research is challenged by the inconsistent articulation of the concept of urban food forestry....
Article
Fuelwood is an essential forest product for small-holder farmers in the tropics, but fuelwood harvesting may cause forest degradation and impact ecosystem services. Understanding tree species composition, diversity and biomass changes in forests with active fuelwood collection is important for informing sustainable forest harvesting. In the miombo...
Chapter
Which ecosystem services are addressed? Provisioning: agricultural production (crops, pork), provision of clean water, maple syrup production, milk production
Article
Full-text available
Abstract While orthogonal (i.e., aerial or satellite) imagery has become the more conventional source of land cover data because it can yield spatially accurate land cover maps, terrestrial oblique photographs present a valuable, relatively untapped source of raw optical data for studies of land cover change. We present a case study contrasting how...
Article
1.Agriculture's influence on humanity is a dichotomy of promise and peril. Research on the food‐environment dilemma has highlighted the environmental consequences of food production, yet the identification of management solutions is an on‐going challenge. 2.We suggest “bright spots” as a promising tool to identify levers of change by finding areas...
Article
Despite the availability of a wide range of tools, measuring and explaining changes in land cover and land use in tropical regions can be extremely challenging. Kerala, India, is a biodiversity hotspot with a high population density and a long history of complex agricultural land-use patterns. Some reports suggest that agriculture in Kerala, which...
Article
What happens when swidden cultivation systems in tropical forests become land-constrained? In this paper we report the findings of a long-term, interdisciplinary project on swidden farming, swidden farming households, and the forest landscape in a Peruvian Amazonian peasant community that has faced growing land scarcity over the past 35 years. Data...
Article
Montane tropical cloud forests, with their complex topography, biodiversity, high numbers of endemic species, and rapid rates of clearing, are a top global conservation priority. However, species distributions at local and landscape scales in cloud forests are still poorly understood, in part because few regions have been surveyed. Empirical work h...
Chapter
Landscape management is increasingly focused on trade-offs among various ecosystem services. For example, while clearing forests may produce timber and provide land for agriculture, it also releases significant amounts of carbon to the atmosphere, influencing the global climate system. Evaluating the tradeoffs among ecosystem services is made diffi...
Article
Full-text available
Decline in agricultural biodiversity (cultivated species and wild species used for food or that support agro-ecosystem functioning) at the farm scale has fueled concerns about potential negative effects of this biodiversity loss on the ecological and economic sustainability of agro-ecosystems. Despite these concerns, formal assessment of how agro-b...
Article
In the study of shifting cultivation systems, fallow duration is seen as the key determinant of vegetation and soil dynamics: long fallows renew soil fertility, biomass and biodiversity. However, long fallow systems are increasingly replaced around the world with short-medium fallow systems, and awareness is growing of the need to look across multi...
Article
Full-text available
Can social inequality be seen imprinted in a forest landscape? We studied the relationship between land holding, land use, and inequality in a peasant community in the Peruvian Amazon where farmers practice swidden-fallow cultivation. Longitudinal data on land holding, land use, and land cover were gathered through field-level surveys (n = 316) and...
Article
Ecosystem services (ES) span the interface of social and ecological systems, which makes them inherently challenging to measure. Tracking ES patterns over long time frames is crucial for understanding slow variables and complex interactions, but long-term studies of ES are rare. Historical records can play an important role in revealing temporal pa...
Article
Farmers are under ever growing pressure to increase productivity to meet both food and fibre needs, as well as rising household economic demands. In many shifting cultivation systems, farmers are taking advantage of restorative forest fallow periods to plant commercially-oriented orchards to increase output. While there is an economic benefit to th...
Article
Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. T...
Article
Community-based tropical forest restoration projects, often promoted as a win-win solution for local communities and the environment, have increased dramatically in number in the past decade. Many such projects are underway in Andean cloud forests, which, given their extremely high biodiversity and history of extensive clearing, are understudied. T...
Article
Full-text available
To maximize specific ecosystem services (ES) such as food production, people alter landscape structure, i.e., the types of ecosystems present, their relative proportions, and their spatial arrangement across landscapes. This can have significant, and sometimes unexpected, effects on biodiversity and ES. Communities need information about how land-u...
Article
Full-text available
Managing multiple ecosystem services (ES), including addressing trade-offs between services and preventing ecological surprises, is among the most pressing areas for sustainability research. These challenges require ES research to go beyond the currently common approach of snapshot studies limited to one or two services at a single point in time. W...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of rapid environmental and cultural change, orthodox concepts in restoration ecology such as historical fidelity are being challenged. Here we re-examine the diverse roles played by historical knowledge in restoration, and argue that these roles remain vitally important. As such, historical knowledge will be critical in shaping restorat...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Nature provides a wide range of benefits to people. Past attempts to enhance a specific ecosystem service (ES), such as food production, have often led to unexpected and undesirable effects on other ES. To reduce these unwanted results, we need to better understand relationships among ES and the conditions under which s...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental challenges are complex and require expertise from multiple disciplines. Consequently, there is growing interest in interdisciplinary environmental research that integrates natural and social science, an often arduous undertaking. We surveyed researchers interested and experienced in research at the human—environment interface to asses...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Past land use affects present-day biodiversity, in particular through the type of land use and the resulting forest fragmentation. While past land use modifies soil properties, past landscape configuration affects plant species dispersal. Both can induce changes in the composition of a plant community and lower the abun...
Article
Full-text available
In regions of water scarcity, mapping individual crops, cropping intensities and irrigation can contribute significantly to understanding agricultural water use. But such mapping is challenging in landscapes dominated by small-scale traditional agricultural land holdings with high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Here, we assessed the benefit of...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we illustrate how fine-grained longitudinal analyses of land holding and land use among forest peasant households in an Amazonian village can enrich our understanding of the poverty/land cover nexus. We examine the dynamic links in shifting cultivation systems among asset poverty, land use, and land cover in a community where povert...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Agricultural landscapes can provide multiple ecosystem services, including food, high quality freshwater, opportunities for recreation, and flood control. Yet we often focus narrowly on the production of food, which can unintentionally undermine provision of other key services. The concept of ecosystem services can be...
Article
Full-text available
We argue for the landscape ecology community to adopt the study of poverty and the ecology of landscapes as a Grand Challenge Topic. We present five areas of possible research foci that we believe that landscape ecologists can join with other social and environmental scientists to increase scientific understanding of this pressing issue: (1) scale...
Article
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The classic story of historical land-cover change in the United States suggests that agricultural clearing in the 1800s was followed by agricultural abandonment at the turn of the twentieth century and subsequent forest regrowthoften referred to as a forest transition. Most descriptions present statistical data from historical censuses and surveys...
Article
Historical land use can influence forest species composition and structure for centuries after direct use has ceased. In Wisconsin, USA, Euro-American settlement in the mid- to late 1800s was accompanied by widespread logging, agricultural conversion, and fire suppression. To determine the maximum magnitude of change in forest ecosystems at the hei...
Article
Full-text available
One-third of net CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere since 1850 are the result of land-use change, primarily from the clearing of forests for timber and agriculture, but quantifying these changes is complicated by the lack of historical data on both former ecosystem conditions and the extent and spatial configuration of subsequent land use. Using fin...
Article
Full-text available
Land-use legacies can persist for hundreds to thousands of years, influencing plant species composition, nutrient cycling, water flows, and climate. To understand how land use has affected regional land-cover composition in Wisconsin (USA), we assessed the magnitude and direction of change in land cover between: (1) c.1850, at the onset of Euro-Ame...
Article
Full-text available
Repeat ground photographs (taken in 1915 and 1997) from a series of topographical survey stations and repeat aerial photographs (flown in 1949 and 1991) were analysed to assess changes in vegetation composition and distribution in the montane ecoregion of Jasper National Park, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada. A quantitative approach for a...

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Projects (2)
Project
To foster transitions in the way in which forests are exploited, managed and restored by developing future scenarios and using them in decision-making platforms at local, regional and global scales. In order to achieve this, we have three specific objectives: I. Understanding Feedbacks between ecological processes, stakeholder strategies and policy decisions along the forest transition curve and across biomes, which is crucial to developing better scenarios. II. Constructing Scenarios of alternative futures, developing in parallel the three complementary approaches to model development based on trade-offs between precision, generality and realism. III. Fostering Change by: engaging decision-makers and stakeholders at multiple levels in dialogues and transformative scenarios to identify strategy and policy options; generating the will and commitment towards change; facilitating and promoting the capacity to develop scenarios; and harvesting outcome stories to demonstrate impact.