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Jean-Luc Runavot

Jean-Luc Runavot

Dr in Biochemistry

About

9
Publications
6,081
Reads
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228
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2014 - present
Bayer CropScience
Position
  • Junior Scientist
April 2012 - May 2014
Bayer CropScience
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2007 - January 2011
French Institute of Brewing and Malting
French Institute of Brewing and Malting
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
The roles of non-cellulosic polysaccharides in cotton fiber development are poorly understood. Combining glycan microarrays and in situ analyses with monoclonal antibodies, polysaccharide linkage analyses and transcript profiling the occurrence of heteromannan and heteroxylan polysaccharides and related genes in developing and mature cotton (Gossyp...
Article
Full-text available
Cotton fibre is mainly composed of cellulose, although non-cellulosic polysaccharides play key roles during fibre development and are still present in the harvested fibre. This study aimed at determining the fate of non-cellulosic polysaccharides during cotton textile processing. We analyzed non-cellulosic cotton fibre polysaccharides during differ...
Article
Full-text available
A detailed knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity and complexity is crucial for understanding plant growth and development. One key challenge is to establish links between polysaccharide-rich cell walls and their phenotypic characteristics. It is of particular interest for some plant material, like cotton fibers, which are of both biological and indu...
Article
Full-text available
The plant cuticle consists of cutin, a polyester of glycerol, hydroxyl, and epoxy fatty acids, covered and filled by waxes. While the biosynthesis of cutin building blocks is well documented, the mechanisms underlining their extracellular deposition remain unknown. Among the proteins extracted from dewaxed tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) peels, we id...
Article
One of the objectives of the malting industry is to reduce the energy cost during kilning without major effect on malt quality. In this study, the impact of a low hydration steeping process on lipid transfer protein (LTP1) modifications and β-glucan breakdown was evaluated in low (LH) and high (HH) hydrated malts. LTP1 modifications analyzed by MS/...
Article
Full-text available
Main conclusion Evidence is presented that cotton fibre adhesion and middle lamella formation are preceded by cutin dilution and accompanied by rhamnogalacturonan-I metabolism. Cotton fibres are single cell structures that early in development adhere to one another via the cotton fibre middle lamella (CFML) to form a tissue-like structure. The CFML...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cotton fibre quality traits such as fibre length, strength, and degree of maturation are determined by genotype and environment during the sequential phases of cotton fibre development (cell elongation, transition to secondary cell wall construction and cellulose deposition). The cotton fibre middle lamella (CFML) is crucial for both cel...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In June 2011, the Marie Curie initial training network (ITN) WallTraC (the Plant Cell Wall Training Consortium), coordinated by Dr marie-Christine Ralet (Inra Angers-Nantes, France), brought together nine leading academic and private beneficiaries and two associated partners around two strategic objectives: • To develop new tools and concepts to advance knowledge on plant cell walls, • To provide high quality, inter-sectorial and trans-disciplinary training to young research fellows. The consortium has successfully trained 13 young researchers - 11 PhD students and 2 post-doctoral researchers - from all over the world. Together, they expanded knowledge in plant cell walls by exploring a wide range of research fields going from enzymology to food polymer processing, through biochemistry, immunolabelling, bioinformatics, textile processing and crystallography. Throughout the whole project, 50 articles were published in peer-reviewed journals.