JC Hechavarria

JC Hechavarria
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main · Institute for Cell Biology and Neuroscience

BSc-> MSc-> PhD -> group leader

About

78
Publications
8,089
Reads
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551
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - present
November 2010 - November 2013
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2002 - July 2007
University of Havana
Position
  • Student

Publications

Publications (78)
Article
Full-text available
The mammalian frontal and auditory cortices are important for vocal behavior. Here, using local-field potential recordings, we demonstrate that the timing and spatial patterns of oscillations in the fronto-auditory network of vocalizing bats (Carollia perspicillata) predict the purpose of vocalization: echolocation or communication. Transfer entrop...
Article
Full-text available
Echolocation behavior, a navigation strategy based on acoustic signals, allows scientists to explore neural processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli. For the purpose of orientation, bats broadcast echolocation calls and extract spatial information from the echoes. Because bats control call emission and thus the availability of spatial informatio...
Article
Identifying unexpected acoustic inputs, which allows to react appropriately to new situations, is of major importance for animals. Neural deviance detection describes a change of neural response strength to a stimulus solely caused by the stimulus’ probability of occurrence. In the present study, we searched for correlates of deviance detection in...
Article
Sound discrimination is essential in many species for communicating and foraging. Bats, for example, use sounds for echolocation and communication. In the bat auditory cortex there are neurons that process both sound categories but how these neurons respond to acoustic transitions, i.e. echolocation streams followed by a communication sound, remain...
Preprint
Full-text available
The mammalian frontal and auditory cortices are fundamental structures supporting vocal behaviour, yet the patterns of information exchange between these regions during vocalization remain unknown. Here, we address this issue by means of electrophysiological recordings in the fronto-auditory network of freely-vocalizing Carollia perspicillata bats....
Article
Full-text available
Distress calls are a vocalization type widespread across the animal kingdom, emitted when the animals are under duress, e.g. when captured by a predator. Here, we report on an observation we came across serendipitously while recording distress calls from the bat species Carollia perspicillata , i.e. the existence of sex difference in the distress c...
Preprint
Full-text available
The mammalian frontal and auditory cortices are fundamental structures supporting vocal production, yet the dynamics of information exchange between these regions during vocalization are unknown. Here, we tackle this issue by means of electrophysiological recordings in the fronto-auditory network of freely-vocalizing Carollia perspicillata bats. We...
Article
Full-text available
Animals extract behaviorally relevant signals from “noisy” environments. Echolocation behavior provides a rich system testbed for investigating signal extraction. When echolocating in acoustically enriched environments, bats show many adaptations that are believed to facilitate signal extraction. Most studies to date focused on describing adaptatio...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vocal communication is essential to coordinate social interactions in mammals and it requires a fine discrimination of communication sounds. It is known that auditory neurons can exhibit selectivity for specific natural sounds, but how this selectivity is affected by acoustic context (i.e. other natural sounds that precede the sound in question) is...
Article
Full-text available
The auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus, IC) plays an important role in sound processing, acting as hub for acoustic information extraction and for the implementation of fast audio-motor behaviors. IC neurons are topographically organized according to their sound frequency preference: dorsal IC regions encode low frequencies while ventral areas...
Article
Full-text available
Echolocating bats rely upon spectral interference patterns in echoes to reconstruct fine details of a reflecting object's shape. However, the acoustic modulations required to do this are extremely brief, raising questions about how their auditory cortex encodes and processes such rapid and fine spectrotemporal details. Here, we tested the hypothesi...
Article
Full-text available
Neural oscillations are at the core of important computations in the mammalian brain. Interactions between oscillatory activities in different frequency bands, such as delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), or gamma (>30 Hz), are a powerful mechanism for binding fundamentally distinct spatiotemporal scales of neural processing. Phase-amplitude coupling (P...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neural oscillations are at the core of important computations in the mammalian brain. Interactions between oscillatory activities in different frequency bands, such as delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), or gamma (>30 Hz), are a powerful mechanism for binding fundamentally distinct spatiotemporal scales of neural processing. Phase-amplitude coupling (P...
Article
Full-text available
Communication sounds are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, where they play a role in advertising physiological states and/or socio-contextual scenarios. Human screams, for example, are typically uttered in fearful contexts and they have a distinctive feature termed as “roughness”, which depicts amplitude fluctuations at rates from 30–150 Hz. In thi...
Article
Full-text available
Most mammals rely on the extraction of acoustic information from the environment in order to survive. However, the mechanisms that support sound representation in auditory neural networks involving sensory and association brain areas remain underexplored. In this study, we address the functional connectivity between an auditory region in frontal co...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to vocalize is ubiquitous in vertebrates, but neural networks underlying vocal control remain poorly understood. Here, we performed simultaneous neuronal recordings in the frontal cortex and dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus, CN) during the production of echolocation pulses and communication calls in bats. This approach allowed us to ass...
Preprint
Full-text available
Most mammals rely on the extraction of acoustic information from the environment in order to survive. However, the mechanisms that support sound representation in auditory neural networks involving sensory and association brain areas remain underexplored. In this study, we address the functional connectivity between an auditory region in frontal co...
Article
An objective method to evaluate auditory brainstem-evoked responses (ABR) based on the root-mean-square (rms) amplitude of the measured signal and bootstrapping procedures was used to determine threshold curves (see Lv et al. in Med Eng Phys 29:191–198, 2007; Linnenschmidt and Wiegrebe in Hear Res 373:85–95, 2019). The rms values and their signific...
Preprint
Full-text available
The auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus, IC) plays an important role in sound processing, acting as hub for acoustic information extraction and for the implementation of fast audio-motor behaviors. IC neurons are topographically organized according to their sound frequency preference: dorsal IC regions encode low frequencies while ventral areas...
Article
Full-text available
Empirical evidence suggests that, in the auditory cortex (AC), the phase relationship between spikes and local-field potentials (LFPs) plays an important role in the processing of auditory stimuli. Nevertheless, unlike the case of other sensory systems, it remains largely unexplored in the auditory modality whether the properties of the cortical co...
Article
Full-text available
Frontal areas of the mammalian cortex are thought to be important for cognitive control and complex behaviour. These areas have been studied mostly in humans, non‐human primates and rodents. In this article, we present a quantitative characterization of response properties of a frontal auditory area responsive to sound in the brain of Carollia pers...
Preprint
Full-text available
Communication sounds are ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, where they play a role in advertising physiological states and/or socio-contextual scenarios. Distress sounds, for example, are typically uttered in distressful scenarios such as agonistic interactions. Here, we report on the occurrence of superfast temporal periodicities in distress calls...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to vocalize is ubiquitous in vertebrates, but neural networks leading to vocalization production remain poorly understood. Here we performed simultaneous, large scale, neuronal recordings in the frontal cortex and dorsal striatum (caudate nucleus) during the production of echolocation and non-echolocation calls in bats. This approach al...
Article
Full-text available
Echolocating bats emit biosonar calls and use echoes arising from call reflections, for orientation. They often pattern their calls into groups which increases the rate of sensory feedback. Insectivorous bats emit call groups at a higher rate when orienting in cluttered compared to uncluttered environments. Frugivorous bats increase the rate of cal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Frontal areas of the mammalian cortex are thought to be important for cognitive control and complex behaviour. These areas have been studied mostly in humans, non-human primates and rodents. In this article, we present a quantitative characterization of response properties of a frontal auditory area responsive to sound in the bat brain, the frontal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Animals must extract relevant sensory information out of a multitude of non-informative and sometimes interfering stimuli. For orientation, bats rely on broadcasted calls and they must assign each echo to the corresponding call. When bats orient in acoustically enriched environments, call-echo assignment becomes challenging due to signal interferen...
Preprint
Full-text available
For orientation, echolocating bats emit biosonar calls and use echoes arising from call reflections. They often pattern their calls into groups which increases the rate of sensory feedback over time. Insectivorous bats emit call groups at a higher rate when orienting in cluttered compared to uncluttered environments. Frugivorous bats increase the r...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental evidence supports that cortical oscillations represent multiscale temporal modulations existent in natural stimuli, yet little is known about the processing of these multiple timescales at a neuronal level. Here, using extracellular recordings from the auditory cortex (AC) of awake bats (Carollia perspicillata), we show the existence o...
Article
Full-text available
The extraction of temporal information from sensory input streams is of paramount importance in the auditory system. In this study, amplitude modulated sounds were used as stimuli to drive auditory cortex (AC) neurons of the bat species Carollia perspicillata, in order to assess the interactions between cortical spikes and local-field potentials (L...
Article
Full-text available
Processing of ethologically relevant stimuli could be interfered by non-relevant stimuli. Animals have behavioral adaptations to reduce signal interference. It is largely unexplored whether the behavioral adaptations facilitate neuronal processing of relevant stimuli. Here, we characterize behavioral adaptations in the presence of biotic noise in t...
Article
Full-text available
The acoustic representation of the outside world in the midbrain of a bat becomes more precise as it uses double clicks to locate closer objects.
Article
Full-text available
For the purpose of orientation, echolocating bats emit highly repetitive and spatially directed sonar calls. Echoes arising from call reflections are used to create an acoustic image of the environment. The inferior colliculus (IC) represents an important auditory stage for initial processing of echolocation signals. The present study addresses the...
Article
This article presents a characterization of cortical responses to artificial and natural temporally-patterned sounds in the bat species Carollia perspicillata, a species that produces vocalizations at rates above 50 Hz. Multi-unit activity was recorded in three different experiments. In the first experiment, amplitude modulated (AM) pure tones were...
Article
Full-text available
In mammals, acoustic communication plays an important role during social behaviors. Despite their ethological relevance, the mechanisms by which the auditory cortex represents different communication call properties remain elusive. Recent studies have pointed out that communication-sound encoding could be based on discharge patterns of neuronal pop...
Data
Interquartile range of MUA, LFP and CSD profiles of stimulus-evoked recordings. Each point in the profiles represents the interquartile range of the depth-adjusted (n = 61) MUA (Aa-Ai), LFP (Ba-Bi), and CSD (Ca-Ci) in the response to two pure tones (rows 1-2) and 7 different complex sounds (rows 3-9). Interquartile ranges of LFPs and CSDs were excl...
Data
Correlation coefficients between waveforms recorded from low and high frequency tuned neurons. The figure shows the correlation coefficients (zero time lag) of single MUA, LFP, and CSD waveforms (averaged over 50 trials) between low frequency (n = 32) and high frequency tuned neurons (n = 29) of layer IV. Each waveform of one of the two frequency g...
Data
Representative MUA, LFP, and CSD responses of layer IV neurons tuned to low and high frequencies. The different neuronal-specific receptive fields across the mapped cortical region (CF < 6 kHz: n = 32; CF > 6 kHz: n = 29, see Fig 2C) could affect the stimulus response. In order to observe receptive field specific changes the MUA-based peri-stimulus...
Data
Repeated measures ANOVA between all cross-compared laminar MUA, LFP, and CSD profiles. A parametric repeated measures ANOVA in combination with a false discovery rate post-hoc test was applied for 61 measurement points at each of the 600 time points and all 16 channels of the MUAs (A); the LFPs (B), and the CSDs (C). Each stimulus-evoked profile wa...
Poster
Full-text available
For proper spatial orientation, animals have to compute their own location in relation to surrounding objects (egocentric representation). Vision, audition and somatosensation represent only few sensory modalities on which the animals can potentially rely on for quantifying their egocentric representation. Echolocating bats primarily use their high...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms by which the mammalian brain copes with information from natural vocalization streams remain poorly understood. This article shows that in highly vocal animals, such as the bat species Carollia perspicillata, the spike activity of auditory cortex neurons does not track the temporal information flow enclosed in fast time-varying vocal...
Article
Full-text available
Bats orientate in darkness by listening to echoes from their biosonar calls, a behaviour known as echolocation. Recent studies showed that cortical neurons respond in a highly selective manner when stimulated with natural echolocation sequences that contain echoes from single targets. However, it remains unknown how cortical neurons process echoloc...
Article
Full-text available
It has been reported previously that in the inferior colliculus of the bat Molossus molossus, neuronal duration tuning is ambiguous because the tuning type of the neurons dramatically changes with the sound level. In the present study, duration tuning was examined in the auditory cortex of M. molossus to describe if it is as ambiguous as the collic...
Article
While approaching an object, echolocating bats decrease the amplitude of their vocalizations. This behavior is known as “echo-level compensation.” Here, the activation pattern of the cortical FM-FM (frequency modulated) area of the mustached bat is assessed by using acoustic stimuli that correspond to sonar signals and their echoes emitted during e...
Article
In the cochlea of the mustached bat, cochlear resonance produces extremely sharp frequency tuning to the dominant frequency of the echolocation calls, around 61 kHz. Such high frequency resolution in the cochlea is accomplished at the expense of losing temporal resolution because of cochlear ringing, an effect that is observable not only in the coc...
Article
Full-text available
Distress vocalizations (also known as alarm or screams) are an important component of the vocal repertoire of a number of animal species, including bats, humans, monkeys and birds, among others. Although the behavioral relevance of distress vocalizations is undeniable, at present, little is known about the rules that govern vocalization production...
Article
Full-text available
A number of studies have successfully used electrocardiogram (ECG) signals to characterize complex physiological phenomena such as associative learning in bats. However, at present, no thorough characterization of the structure of ECG signals is available for these animals. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively characterize features of...
Article
Full-text available
Precise temporal coding is necessary for proper acoustic analysis. However, at cortical level, forward suppression appears to limit the ability of neurons to extract temporal information from natural sound sequences. Here we studied how temporal processing can be maintained in the bats’ cortex in the presence of suppression evoked by natural echolo...
Poster
Full-text available
In the auditory system detailed temporal processing is crucial. Deficits in temporal processing, especially at cortical level, might result in language disorders like ”word deafness”. It has been shown that during repetitive sound stimulation suppression reduces temporal tracking capacity of cortical neurons. During echolocation, bats emit sequence...
Conference Paper
A high number of bats are being killed by wind energy plants (WEPs) either by direct collision with the rotor-blades or due to an abrupt drop in pressure behind the rotor blades, which leads to the rupture of blood vessels and lungs, and thus to death by internal bleeding (barotrauma). In order to prevent a high bat mortality related to WEPs, a rad...
Article
Full-text available
During echolocation, bats estimate distance to avoid obstacles and capture moving prey. The primary distance cue is the delay between the bat's emitted echolocation pulse and the return of an echo. In the bat's auditory system, echo delay-tuned neurons that only respond to pulse-echo pairs having a specific echo delay serve target distance calculat...
Article
Full-text available
Current source density (CSD) analysis assesses spatiotemporal synaptic activations at somatic and/or dendritic levels in the form of depolarizing current sinks. Whereas many studies have focused on the short (<50 ms) latency sinks, associated with thalamocortical projections, sinks with longer latencies have received less attention. Here, we analyz...