Jazmín Ramos Madrigal

Jazmín Ramos Madrigal
University of Copenhagen · Centre for Evolutionary Hologenomics

PhD

About

69
Publications
21,507
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1,184
Citations
Citations since 2016
68 Research Items
1182 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
Full-text available
Few studies have addressed how selective pressures have shaped the genetic structure of the current Native American populations, and they have mostly limited their inferences to admixed Latin American populations. Here, we searched for local adaptation signals, based on integrated haplotype scores and population branch statistics, in 325 Mexican In...
Article
Full-text available
The grey wolf (Canis lupus) was the first species to give rise to a domestic population, and they remained widespread throughout the last Ice Age when many other large mammal species went extinct. Little is known, however, about the history and possible extinction of past wolf populations or when and where the wolf progenitors of the present-day do...
Article
Full-text available
The plant-associated microbiome has been shown to vary considerably between species and across environmental gradients. The effects of genomic variation on the microbiome within single species are less clearly understood, with results often confounded by the larger effects of climatic and edaphic variation. In this study, our objective was to confi...
Article
Subzero temperatures are among the most significant factors defining the distribution of organisms, yet, certain taxa have evolved to overcome this barrier. The microscopic tardigrades are among the most freeze-tolerant animals, with selected species reported to survive milli-Kelvin temperatures. Here, we estimate survival of fully hydrated eutardi...
Article
Tardigrades are renowned for their extreme stress tolerance, which includes the ability to endure complete desiccation, high levels of radiation and very low sub-zero temperatures. Nevertheless, tardigrades appear to be vulnerable to high temperatures and thus the potential effects of global warming. Here, we provide the first analysis of transcrip...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Sicilian wolf represented the only population of wolves living on a Mediterranean island until the first half of the twentieth century (1930s-1960s) 1–7 . Previous studies hypothesised that they remained isolated from mainland wolves from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) 8,9 , until human persecutions led them to extinction 1–7 . There...
Preprint
Full-text available
The plant-associated microbiome has been shown to vary considerably between species and across environmental gradients. The effects of genomic variation on the microbiome within single species are less clearly understood, with results often confounded by the larger effects of climatic and edaphic variation. In this study, the effect of genomic vari...
Article
Full-text available
The genetic makeup of Indigenous populations inhabiting Mexico has been strongly influenced by geography and demographic history. Here, we perform a genome-wide analysis of 716 newly genotyped individuals from 60 of the 68 recognized ethnic groups in Mexico. We show that the genetic structure of these populations is strongly influenced by geography...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of the genera Bos and Bison and the nature of gene flow between wild and domestic species, is poorly understood, with genomic data of wild species being limited. We generated two genomes from the likely extinct Kouprey (Bos sauveli) and analysed them alongside other Bos and Bison genomes. We found that B. sauveli possessed genomic sig...
Article
Full-text available
Dogs have been essential to life in the Siberian Arctic for over 9,500 y, and this tight link between people and dogs continues in Siberian communities. Although Arctic Siberian groups such as the Nenets received limited gene flow from neighboring groups, archaeological evidence suggests that metallurgy and new subsistence strategies emerged in Nor...
Article
Full-text available
Large vertebrates are extremely sensitive to anthropogenic pressure, and their populations are declining fast. The white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is a paradigmatic case: this African megaherbivore suffered a remarkable decline in the last 150 years due to human activities. Its subspecies, the northern (NWR) and the southern white rhinoceros...
Article
Full-text available
The Near East and the Caucasus are commonly regarded as the original domestication centres of Vitis vinifera (grapevine), and the region continues to be home to a high diversity of wild and cultivated grapevines, particularly within Georgia. The earliest chemical evidence for wine making was recorded in Georgian Neolithic sites (6000–5800 bc) and g...
Article
Full-text available
Homotherium was a genus of large-bodied scimitar-toothed cats, morphologically distinct from any extant felid species, that went extinct at the end of the Pleistocene [1, 2, 3, 4]. They possessed large, saber-form serrated canine teeth, powerful forelimbs, a sloping back, and an enlarged optic bulb, all of which were key characteristics for predati...
Article
Full-text available
The Japanese or Honshū wolf was one the most distinct gray wolf subspecies due to its small stature and endemicity to the islands of Honshū, Shikoku, and Kyūshū. Long revered as a guardian of farmers and travellers, it was persecuted from the 17th century following a rabies epidemic, which led to its extinction in the early 20th century. To better...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Sled dog arctic adaptations go far back Dogs have been used for sledding in the Arctic as far back as ∼9500 years ago. However, the relationships among the earliest sled dogs, other dog populations, and wolves are unknown. Sinding et al. sequenced an ancient sled dog, 10 modern sled dogs, and an ancient wolf and analyzed their genetic relationships...
Article
The Caribbean was one of the last regions of the Americas to be settled by humans, but how, when, and from where they reached the islands remains unclear. We generated genome-wide data for 93 ancient Caribbean islanders dating between 3200-400 cal. BP and find evidence of at least three separate dispersals into the region, including two early dispe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Large vertebrates are extremely sensitive to anthropogenic pressure, and their populations are declining fast. The white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is a paradigmatic case: this African megaherbivore suffered a remarkable population reduction in the last 150 years due to human activities. The two white rhinoceros subspecies, the northern (NWR)...
Article
Full-text available
The ancient DNA revolution of the past 35 years has driven an explosion in the breadth, nuance, and diversity of questions that are approachable using ancient biomolecules, and plant research has been a constant, indispensable facet of these developments. Using archaeological, paleontological, and herbarium plant tissues, researchers have probed pl...
Article
Full-text available
The phylogenetic relationships between hominins of the Early Pleistocene epoch in Eurasia, such as Homo antecessor, and hominins that appear later in the fossil record during the Middle Pleistocene epoch, such as Homo sapiens, are highly debated1,2,3,4,5. For the oldest remains, the molecular study of these relationships is hindered by the degradat...
Article
Full-text available
The ancient DNA revolution of the past 35 years has driven an explosion in the breadth, nuance, and diversity of questions that are approachable using ancient biomolecules, and plant research has been a constant, indispensable facet of these developments. Using archaeological, paleontological, and herbarium plant tissues, researchers have probed pl...
Article
Full-text available
Extrachromosomal circular DNA elements (eccDNAs) of chromosomal origin are known to be common in a number of eukaryotic species. However, it remains to be addressed whether genomic features such as genome size, the load of repetitive elements within a genome and/or animal physiology affects the number of eccDNAs. Here we investigate the distributio...
Article
Full-text available
Gigantopithecus blacki was a giant hominid that inhabited densely forested environments of Southeast Asia during the Pleistocene epoch1. Its evolutionary relationships to other great ape species, and the divergence of these species during the Middle and Late Miocene epoch (16–5.3 million years ago), remain unclear2,3. Hypotheses regarding the relat...
Article
Full-text available
The sequencing of ancient DNA has enabled the reconstruction of speciation, migration and admixture events for extinct taxa¹. However, the irreversible post-mortem degradation² of ancient DNA has so far limited its recovery—outside permafrost areas—to specimens that are not older than approximately 0.5 million years (Myr)³. By contrast, tandem mass...
Preprint
From 1500 to 1900, an estimated 12 million Africans were transported to the Americas as part of the transatlantic slave trade. Following Britain's abolition of slave trade in 1807, the Royal Navy patrolled the Atlantic and intercepted slave ships that continued to operate. During this period, the island of St Helena in the South Atlantic served as...
Article
Full-text available
The Eurasian grapevine (Vitis vinifera) has long been important for wine production as well as being a food source. Despite being clonally propagated, modern cultivars exhibit great morphological and genetic diversity, with thousands of varieties described in historic and contemporaneous records. Through historical accounts, some varieties can be t...
Article
Archaeologists often struggle with the challenge of linking historic-period artifact assemblages with specific communities. In particular, small home sites discovered on historic plantations are often difficult to identify as an African American or white tenant house since the material culture appears similar. The discipline also struggles with how...
Article
The complexity of maize domestication Maize originated in what is now central Mexico about 9000 years ago and spread throughout the Americas before European contact. Kistler et al. applied genomic analysis to ancient and extant South American maize lineages to investigate the genetic changes that accompanied domestication (see the Perspective by Ze...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives Dental calculus is among the richest known sources of ancient DNA in the archaeological record. Although most DNA within calculus is microbial, it has been shown to contain sufficient human DNA for the targeted retrieval of whole mitochondrial genomes. Here, we explore whether calculus is also a viable substrate for whole human genome re...
Data
Table showing the catalog number, species information, average genomic sequencing coverage, identified genetic clusters, location and date of sample collection, and the publication associated with the publicly available data.
Article
Full-text available
The evolutionary history of the wolf-like canids of the genus Canis has been heavily debated, especially regarding the number of distinct species and their relationships at the population and species level [1–6]. We assembled a dataset of 48 resequenced genomes spanning all members of the genus Canis except the black-backed and side-striped jackals...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ancient DNA (aDNA) sequencing has enabled unprecedented reconstruction of speciation, migration, and admixture events for extinct taxa. Outside the permafrost, however, irreversible aDNA post-mortem degradation has so far limited aDNA recovery within the ~0.5 million years (Ma) time range. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS)-based collagen type I (COL1)...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Southeast (SE) Asia is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world and it holds approximately 20% of all mammal species. Despite this, the majority of SE Asia's genetic diversity is still poorly characterised. The growing interest in using environmental DNA (eDNA) to assess and monitor SE Asian species, in particular threatened mamm...
Preprint
This protocol allows for adequate DNA extraction from archival samples.
Preprint
This protocol allows for adequate DNA extraction from fresh blood samples.
Preprint
Gen-IALFirst All-tissue DNA extraction kit -This protocol provides an efficient DNA extraction and purification of historic sample (tissue material)
Preprint
This protocol allows for adequate DNA extraction from fresh tissue samples.
Preprint
Southeast (SE) Asia is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world and it holds approximately 20% of all mammal species. Despite this, the majority of SE Asia’s genetic diversity is still poorly characterized. The growing interest in using environmental DNA (eDNA) to assess and monitor SE Asian species, in particular, threatened mammals - has c...
Preprint
This protocol provides an efficient DNA extraction and purification of historical museum hides, which potentially have been chemically tanned.
Preprint
Gen-IALFirst All-tissue DNA extraction kit -This protocol provides an efficient DNA extraction and purification of fresh sample (tissue material)
Article
The complex evolutionary history of maize (Zea mays L. ssp. mays) has been clarified with genomic-level data from modern landraces and wild teosinte grasses [1, 2], augmenting archaeological findings that suggest domestication occurred between 10,000 and 6,250 years ago in southern Mexico [3, 4]. Maize rapidly evolved under human selection, leading...
Poster
Wine grape(V. vinifera var. vinifera)had been domesticated since Mesopotamia period, yet little is studied about how distinct varieties were produced and its genomic change through time because of its complicated life history and limited material. In order to trace the genomic changes, GrapeReSeq SNP capture technique were used to conduct a genomic...
Article
In ancient DNA (aDNA) research, evolutionary and archaeological questions are often investigated using the genomic sequences of organelles: mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA. Organellar genomes are found in multiple copies per living cell, increasing their chance of recovery from archaeological samples, and are inherited from one parent without gen...