Jayson Smith

Jayson Smith
Stony Brook University | Stony Brook · Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

About

10
Publications
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35
Citations

Publications

Publications (10)
Preprint
Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) has become a method of choice for live imaging because of its fast acquisition and reduced photobleaching and phototoxicity. Despite the strengths and growing availability of LSFM systems, no generalized LSFM mounting protocol has been adapted for live imaging of post-embryonic stages of C. elegans. A majo...
Preprint
Hox transcription factors play fundamental roles during early patterning, but they are also expressed continuously, from embryo through adulthood, in the nervous system. The functional significance of their sustained expression remains unclear. In C. elegans motor neurons (MNs), we find that LIN-39 (Scr/Dfd/Hox4-5) is continuously required during p...
Preprint
Homeobox genes are prominent regulators of neuronal identity, but the extent to which their function has been probed in animal nervous systems remains limited. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, each individual neuron class is defined by the expression of unique combinations of homeobox genes, prompting the question of whether each neuron clas...
Article
Full-text available
Chromatin remodelers such as the SWI/SNF complex coordinate metazoan development through broad regulation of chromatin accessibility and transcription, ensuring normal cell cycle control and cellular differentiation in a lineage-specific and temporally restricted manner. Mutations in genes encoding the structural subunits of chromatin, such as hist...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chromatin remodelers such as the SWI/SNF complex coordinate metazoan development through broad regulation of chromatin accessibility and transcription, ensuring normal cell cycle control and cellular differentiation in a lineage-specific and temporally restricted manner. Mutations in genes encoding the structural subunits of chromatin, such as hist...
Article
Full-text available
Cell proliferation and quiescence are intimately coordinated during metazoan development. Here, we adapt a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) sensor to uncouple these key events of the cell cycle in C. elegans and zebrafish through live-cell imaging. The CDK sensor consists of a fluorescently tagged CDK substrate that steadily translocates from the nucl...
Preprint
Full-text available
During organismal development, differential regulation of the cell cycle is critical to many cell biological processes, including cell fate specification and differentiation. While the mechanisms of cell cycle regulation are well studied, how control of the cell cycle is linked to differentiated cellular behavior remains poorly understood, mostly d...
Article
Full-text available
Cellular invasion is a key part of development, immunity, and disease. Using the in vivo model of C. elegans anchor cell invasion, we characterize the gene regulatory network that promotes cell invasion. The anchor cell is initially specified in a stochastic cell fate decision mediated by Notch signaling. Previous research has identified four conse...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cellular invasion is a key part of development, immunity, and disease. Using the in vivo model of C. elegans anchor cell invasion, we characterize the gene regulatory network that promotes invasive differentiation. The anchor cell is initially specified in a stochastic cell fate decision mediated by Notch signaling. Previous research has identified...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The success of many metazoan developmental programs relies on the ability of specialized cells to transgress basement membranes (BMs). Cancer progression also relies on cellular invasion. Though the developmental and clinical importance of cell invasion is evident, studying its dynamics in vivo has proven to be challenging. Using high-resolution microscopy, as well as genetic and cell biological techniques, we study the process of anchor cell (AC) invasion into the vulval epithelium during C. elegans development as a model for cellular invasion. We have recently demonstrated that the conserved nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor, NHR-67, is required to maintain the AC in G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, a requirement for invasive behavior. Independent of cell cycle arrest, the AC utilizes the histone deacetylase, HDA-1, for the generation of invadopodia, and the expression of pro-invasive genes. These results suggest that invasion is a differentiated cellular behavior requiring cell cycle arrest and epigenetic modification of the genome. To identify additional chromatin modifiers that mediate invasion, we are conducting a tissue-specific RNAi screen. To date, we have identified several new pro-invasive genes which encode subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. The complex exhibits pleiotropy, and in C. elegans it contributes to cell fate specification in the somatic gonad, and cell-cycle exit and differentiation of muscle and intestinal precursors. Here, we show a conserved role for the SWI/SNF complex in coordinating cell cycle arrest, as loss of swsn-1 results in a mitotic AC. Specifically, we are examining the role of the SWI/SNF complex in maintenance of the post-mitotic state and the regulation of pro-invasive gene expression, through potential interactions with NHR-67, HDA-1, other chromatin modifiers and the cell cycle machinery. Using a DNA Helicase B-based CDK2 biosensor our lab has recently adapted to C. elegans, we will further investigate the cell cycle state of the AC in chromatin modifier depleted states. Together, these results will provide new insight into the role of the SWI/SNF complex in orchestrating invasive activity and coordinating exit from the cell cycle.