Jay Evans

Jay Evans
United States Department of Agriculture | USDA · Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

About

642
Publications
135,657
Reads
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29,362
Citations
Introduction
Jay Evans currently works at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture. Jay does research in Bioinformatics, Entomology and Genetics. Current lab projects involve interactions among bees, microbes, and mite-transmitted viruses, and efforts to reduce bee losses from chemical and biotic stresses.
Additional affiliations
January 1996 - December 1998
University of Georgia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 1989 - December 1995
University of Utah
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 1989 - December 1995
University of Utah
Field of study
  • Biology
September 1984 - June 1988
Princeton University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (642)
Article
Trypanosomatids are increasingly recognized as prevalent in European honey bees (Apis mellifera) and by default are attributed to one recognized species, Crithidia mellificae Langridge and McGhee, 1967. We provide reference genetic and ultrastructural data for type isolates of C. mellificae (ATCC 30254 and 30862) in comparison with two recent isola...
Article
The ecdysteroid biosynthetic pathway involves sequential enzymatic hydroxylations by a group of enzymes collectively known as Halloween gene proteins. Complete sequences for three Halloween genes, spook (Vdspo), disembodied (Vddib) and shade (Vdshd), were identified in varroa mites and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of predicted amino acid sequen...
Article
The 5000 arthropod genomes initiative (i5k) has tasked itself with coordinating the sequencing of 5000 insect or related arthropod genomes. The resulting influx of data, mostly from small research groups or communities with little bioinformatics experience, will require visualization, dissemination and curation, preferably from a centralized platfo...
Article
Full-text available
Two species of Spiroplasma (Mollicutes) bacteria were isolated from and described as pathogens of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera, ~30 years ago but recent information on them is lacking despite global concern to understand bee population declines. Here we provide a comprehensive survey for the prevalence of these two Spiroplasma species in...
Article
Full-text available
The first generation of genome sequence assemblies and annotations have had a significant impact upon our understanding of the biology of the sequenced species, the phylogenetic relationships among species, the study of populations within and across species, and have informed the biology of humans. As only a few Metazoan genomes are approaching fin...
Article
Full-text available
Beekeeping is a cornerstone activity that has led to the human-mediated, global spread of western honey bees ( Apis mellifera L.) outside their native range of Europe, western Asia, and Africa. The exportation/importation of honey bees (i.e., transfer of honey bees or germplasm between countries) is regulated at the national level in many countries...
Preprint
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an emerging insect pathogen efficiently transmitted through communicable and vector-borne routes with Apis mellifera. Continual transmission of DWV between hosts and vectors is required for maintenance of the pathogen within the population, and this vector-host-pathogen system offers unique disease transmission dynamics...
Preprint
Full-text available
Deformed wing virus (DWV) is an emerging insect pathogen efficiently transmitted through communicable and vector-borne routes with Apis mellifera . Continual transmission of DWV between hosts and vectors is required for maintenance of the pathogen within the population, and this vector-host-pathogen system offers unique disease transmission dynamic...
Article
Full-text available
Background Insect-vectored Leishmania are responsible for loss of more disability-adjusted life years than any parasite besides malaria. Elucidation of the environmental factors that affect parasite transmission by vectors is essential to develop sustainable methods of parasite control that do not have off-target effects on beneficial insects or en...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor and the viruses it vectors, including types A and B of Deformed wing virus (DWV), pose a major threat to honey bees, Apis mellifera. Analysis of 256 mites collected from the same set of colonies on five occasions from May to October 2021 showed that less than a half of them, 39.8% (95% confidence interval (...
Preprint
Varroa destructor is a cosmopolitan pest and leading cause of colony loss of the European honey bee. Historically described as a competent vector of honey bee viruses, this arthropod vector is cause for the global pandemic of Deformed wing virus, now endemic in honeybee populations. Our work shows viral spread is driven by Varroa actively switching...
Article
Full-text available
Gut parasites of plant-eating insects are exposed to antimicrobial phytochemicals that can reduce infection. Trypanosomatid gut parasites infect insects of diverse nutritional ecologies as well as mammals and plants, raising the question of how host diet-associated phytochemicals shape parasite evolution and host specificity. To test the hypothesis...
Article
Full-text available
Honeybee symbionts, predominantly bacteria, play important roles in honeybee health, nutrition, and pathogen protection, thereby supporting colony health. On the other hand, fungi are often considered indicators of poor bee health, and honeybee microbiome studies generally exclude fungi and yeasts. We hypothesized that yeasts may be an important as...
Article
Host temperature and gut chemistry can shape resistance to parasite infection. Heat and acidity can limit trypanosomatid infection in warm-blooded hosts and could shape infection resistance in insects as well. The colony-level endothermy and acidic guts of social bees provide unique opportunities to study how temperature and acidity shape insect–pa...
Article
Full-text available
Western honey bees (Apis mellifera), a cornerstone to crop pollination in the U.S., are faced with an onslaught of challenges from diseases caused by parasites, pathogens, and pests that affect this economically valuable pollinator. Natural products (NPs), produced by living organisms, including plants and microorganisms, can support health and com...
Preprint
Full-text available
Gut parasites of plant-eating insects are exposed to antimicrobial phytochemicals that can reduce infection. Trypanosomatid gut parasites infect insects of diverse nutritional ecologies as well as mammals and plants, raising the question of how host diet-associated phytochemicals shape parasite evolution and host specificity. To test the hypothesis...
Preprint
Full-text available
Insect-vectored Leishmania are the second-most debilitating of human parasites worldwide. Elucidation of the environmental factors that affect parasite transmission by vectors is essential to develop sustainable methods of parasite control that do not have off-target effects on beneficial insects or environmental health. Many phytochemicals that in...
Article
Full-text available
Background Varroa destructor mites, and the numerous viruses they vector to their honey bee hosts, are among the most serious threats to honey bee populations, causing mortality and morbidity to both the individual honey bee and colony, the negative effects of which convey to the pollination services provided by honey bees worldwide. Here we use a...
Article
Full-text available
Pollinators are in decline thanks to the combined stresses of disease, pesticides, habitat loss, and climate. Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Understanding host-pathogen interactions and virulence of DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of cost-effective high-through...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic landscape changes can affect parasite epidemiology in wild and agricultural animals. Honey bees are agricultural animals whose services are threatened by loss of floral resources and by parasites, most notably the invasive mite Varroa destructor . Existing mite control strategies rely heavily on chemical treatments that can adversely...
Article
Honey bee colony losses worldwide call for a more in-depth understanding of the pathogenic and mutualistic components of the honey bee microbiota and their relation with the environment. In this descriptive study, we characterized the yeast and bacterial communities that arise from six substrates associated with honey bees: corbicular pollen, beebr...
Article
Full-text available
In terms of infectious diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms, the ability to promptly and accurately identify the causative agents is the first step on the path to all types of effective management of such infections. Among the various factors that are affecting global bee health, viruses have often been linked to honey bee colony losses a...
Article
Full-text available
Microsporidia comprise a phylum of single cell, intracellular parasites and represent the earliest diverging branch in the fungal kingdom. The microsporidian parasite Nosema ceranae primarily infects honey bee gut epithelial cells, leading to impaired memory, suppressed host immune responses and colony collapse under certain circumstances. As the g...
Article
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host–pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pollinators are in decline thanks to the combined stresses of disease, pesticides, habitat loss, and climate. Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Understanding host-pathogen interactions and virulence of DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of cost-effective high-through...
Article
Full-text available
Nosema ceranae (Opisthosporidia: Microsporidia) is an emergent intracellular parasite of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) and causes serious Nosema disease which has been associated with worldwide honey bee colony losses. The only registered treatment for Nosema disease is fumagillin-b, and this has raised concerns about resistance and off-t...
Article
Full-text available
Nosemosis C, a Nosema disease caused by microsporidia parasite Nosema ceranae , is a significant disease burden of the European honey bee Apis mellifera which is one of the most economically important insect pollinators. Nevertheless, there is no effective treatment currently available for Nosema disease and the disease mechanisms underlying the pa...
Article
Full-text available
Hygienic behavior is a social defense mechanism against parasites and pathogens in honeybees. We studied the genetic basis of hygienic behavior in African-derived Apis mellifera by performing RNA sequencing on brains of individual honeybee workers observed performing hygienic behavior, in order to identify expression changes linked with this behavi...
Article
Honey bees Apis mellifera forage in a wide radius around their colony, bringing back contaminated food resources that can function as terrestrial bioindicators of environmental pesticide exposure. Evaluating pesticide exposure risk to pollinators is an ongoing problem. Here we apply five metrics for pesticide exposure risk (prevalence, diversity, c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens but arguably none are as devastating as Deformed wing virus (DWV). Development of antiviral therapeutics and virus-resistant honey bee lines to control DWV in honey bees is slowed by the lack of a cost-effective high-throughput screening of DWV infection. Currently, analysis of virus infection and screen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host-pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the most destructive pests of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the primary biotic cause of colony collapse in many regions of the world. These mites inflict physical injury on their honey bee hosts from feeding on host hemolymph and fat body cells/cellular components, and serve as the vector for...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the most destructive pests of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the primary biotic cause of colony collapse in many regions of the world. These mites inflict physical injury on their honey bee hosts from feeding on host hemolymph and fat body cells/cellular components, and serve as the vector for...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transmission routes impact pathogen virulence and genetics, therefore comprehensive knowledge of these routes and their contribution to pathogen circulation is essential for understanding host-pathogen interactions and designing control strategies. Deformed wing virus (DWV), a principal viral pathogen of honey bees associated with increased honey b...
Article
Full-text available
Amygdalin, a cyanogenic glycoside, is found in the nectar and pollen of almond trees, as well as in a variety of other crops, such as cherries, nectarines, apples and others. It is inevitable that western honeybees (Apis mellifera) consistently consume amygdalin during almond pollination season because almond crops are almost exclusively pollinated...
Article
There are viral, fungal, bacterial and trypanosomal pathogens that negatively impact the individual and superorganismal health of the western honey bee. One fungal pathogen, Ascosphaera apis, affects larvae and is the etiological agent of the disease chalkbrood. A previous genome analysis of A. apis revealed that its genome encodes for RNA interfer...
Article
Viral infections are commonly associated with honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony mortality. Using metagenomics, we previously identified 8 viruses from populations of honey bees and 11 other bee species around the world. These viruses had not been previously been described as bee-infecting viruses, and belong to viral families that are not commonly...
Article
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
We developed a honey bee RNA-virus vector based on the genome of a picorna-like Deformed wing virus (DWV), the main viral pathogen of the honey bee (Apis mellifera). To test the potential of DWV to be utilized as a vector, the 717 nt sequence coding for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), flanked by the peptides targeted by viral proteas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Potential biological threats to honey bees must be addressed and validated quickly, before making disruptive and costly decisions. Here we describe numerous Osmia cornifrons (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) cocoons in honey bee cells from one bee hive in Ohio. The developing Osmia cells presented themselves as a mystery at first, catching the attention...
Article
Full-text available
The mite Varroa destructor is one of the most destructive parasites of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and the primary cause of colony collapse in most regions of the world. These mites cause serious injury to their hosts, especially during the larval and pupal stages, and serve as the vector for several viruses, which affect honey bee health causin...
Article
Full-text available
Bumble bee queens undergo a number of biological changes as they transition through adult emergence, mating, overwintering, foraging, and colony initiation including egg laying. Therefore, they represent an important system to understand the link between physiological, behavioral, and environmental changes and host-associated microbiota. It is plau...
Preprint
Full-text available
There are viral, fungal, bacterial and trypanosomal pathogens that negatively impact the individual and superorganismal health of the western honey bee. One fungal pathogen, Ascosphaera apis, affects larvae and causes the disease chalkbrood. A previous genome analysis of As. apis revealed that its genome encodes for RNA interference genes, similar...