Jay F Colinet

Jay F Colinet
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | CDC · Pittsburgh Mining Research Division

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55
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (55)
Article
The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) promulgated a rule in 2014 that required numerous changes in compliance dust sampling requirements for coal mine operators. Two key parts of this rule were the lowering of the respirable coal mine dust standard from 2.0 mg/m3 to 1.5 mg/m3 and requiring operators of underground coal mines to use a con...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Find NIOSH products and get answers to workplace safety and health questions: 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) | TTY: 1-888-232-6348 CDC/NIOSH Suggested Citation NIOSH [2021]. Best practices for dust control in coal mining, second edition. By Colinet JF, Halldin CN, Schall J.
Article
Full-text available
Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP), commonly known as black lung, is caused by the inhalation of respirable coal mine dust and is a disabling and potentially fatal lung disease with no cure. Historically, CWP has taken a tremendous human and financial toll in the US coal mining industry. Recent health surveillance data indicates that CWP continues...
Article
A sociotechnical system (STS) creates a framework that allows an examination of how social and technical factors affect organizational outcomes within a specific environmental context. STS has been rigorously studied with a primary research focus addressing worker-technology interactions. Although these interactions are important, the social proces...
Article
Full-text available
A person-wearable dust monitor that provides nearly real-time, mass-based readings of respirable dust was developed for use in underground coal mines. This personal dust monitor (PDM) combined dust sampling instrumentation with a cap lamp (and battery) into one belt-wearable unit, with the air inlet mounted on the cap lamp. However, obsolescence of...
Article
After industrial sand has been mined and processed, the finished product is typically loaded into small bags of 45 kg (100 lb) or less, large bulk bags of 454 to 1,361 kg (1,000 to 3,000 lb), or vehicles such as trucks or trains for transport to end users. As the sand is being transferred and loaded, dust can be released into the work environment,...
Article
Objective: To characterize workplace practices and respiratory health among coal miners with large opacities consistent with progressive massive fibrosis (PMF) who received care at a federally-funded black lung clinic network in Virginia. Methods: Participants were interviewed about their workplace practices and respiratory health. Medical recor...
Article
Continuous mining machines operating in U.S. underground coal mines have, for decades, utilized flooded-bed dust scrubbers for capturing and removing respirable dust generated at the production face. However, the application of dust scrubbers to longwall mining systems has not yet been successful. Considering that nearly 60% of U.S. underground coa...
Article
Full-text available
Float coal dust is produced by various mining methods, carried by ventilating air and deposited on the floor, roof and ribs of mine airways. It deposited, float dust is re-entrained during a methane explosion. Without sufficient inert rock dust quantities, this float coal dust can propagate an explosion throughout mining entries. Consequently, cont...
Article
Full-text available
Controlling float coal dust in underground coal mines before dispersal into the general airstream can reduce the risk of mine explosions while potentially achieving a more effective and efficient use of rock dust. A prototype flooded-bed scrubber was evaluated for float coal dust control in the return of a continuous miner section. The scrubber was...
Article
Airborne coal dust mass measurements in underground bituminous coal mines can be challenged by the presence of airborne limestone dust, which is an incombustible dust applied to prevent the propagation of dust explosions. To accurately measure the coal portion of this mixed airborne dust, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (N...
Article
Full-text available
To characterize exposure histories and respiratory disease among surface coal miners identified with progressive massive fibrosis from a 2010 to 2011 pneumoconiosis survey. Job history, tenure, and radiograph interpretations were verified. Previous radiographs were reviewed when available. Telephone follow-up sought additional work and medical hist...
Book
Full-text available
Underground coal mining companies that operate continuous miner sections often apply to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) for approval to take extended cuts to depths of up to 40 ft as a means of improving productivity. Historically, MSHA has granted approval of this practice if the mine has successfully demonstrated the ability to c...
Article
Full-text available
The Code of Federal Regulations defines specific size and silica limitations for rock dust that is used in the underground coal mining industry. MSHA collected 444 grab samples of rock dust from mines located in Districts 2 through 11 and made these samples available to NIOSH for analysis. XRF and XRD analyses were completed on 261 rock dust sample...
Article
Full-text available
Although rates of pneumoconiosis in coal miners have declined substantially in the United States since the passage of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, new cases continue to occur, including cases of rapidly progressive disease. In contrast, Australia's underground coal mining industry has reported few new cases of pneumoconiosis...
Article
Significant advances in longwall mining technology and equipment have occurred over the last decade. By the late 1990s, longwall mine output accounted for 40% of all underground output in the U.S. and today longwall mines account for approximately 50% of coal produced underground in the United States. A 51 % increase in average shift production rat...
Article
Full-text available
Although rates of pneumoconiosis in coal miners have declined substantially in the United States since the passage of the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, new cases continue to occur, including cases of rapidly progressive disease. In contrast, Australia's underground coal mining industry has reported few new cases of pneumoconiosis...
Book
Full-text available
Dust surveys were conducted at six underground mines to determine if deep-cut mining practices expose face workers to higher levels of respirable dust by comparing levels during the first 20 ft of advance (regular-cut depth) during the deep cut to levels during the final 10 to 20 ft of advance (deep-cut depth). The studies were conducted at mines w...
Article
Steady increases in longwall production have required operators to apply greater quantities of ventilating air in an effort to control and dilute respirable dust. Significant increases in shearer speeds necessitate that longwall supports also be advanced at a faster rate. Both of these factors may contribute to overall respirable dust levels on the...
Article
Researchers at the Pittsburgh Research Laboratory (PRL) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) work to reduce respirable dust exposures in mining operations. One focus of this research is silica dust control for surface and underground operations in the metal/nonmetal mining industry. PRL researchers analyze dust sampl...
Article
Full-text available
The Thermo-MIE personal DataRAM dust monitor (pDR) is a light-scattering instrument approved for use in gassy underground mines by the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA). However, the use of light-scattering monitors has been inhibited by concerns about inaccurate readings resulting from changes in dust size distribution and composit...
Article
Full-text available
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has conducted benchmarking surveys at longwall operations across the country to identify current operating practices and the types of controls being used. Gravimetric and instantaneous dust sampling was completed to quantify dust generation from major sources and determine the relati...
Article
Operating practices and resulting production from longwall faces are continually improving. Consequently, longwall operators are continually seeking to improve the dust control capabilities on longwalls. TheNationalInstituteforOccupationalSafetyandHealth(NIOSH)hasbeenconductingdustsurveysatlongwalls throughout the country in an effort to document t...
Article
Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health have demonstrated that mine-wide ventilation in large-opening stone mines can be improved by using low-pressure, high-volume propeller fans and constructing stoppings in key locations to direct and control airflow. In light of these find- ings, a comparative study was conduc...
Article
It has long been known that ventilation is a cost- effective method to lower respirable dust concentrations in all types of mining applications. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been working on a number of different research techniques that use ventilation as a critical component to lower respirable dust levels at surfa...
Article
The extraction and transport of coal from underground coal mines can result in significant liberation of coal and/or silica dust into the mine atmosphere. Mine operators have long used ventilating air as a primary means of diluting generated dust, removing dust from the working faces and preventing dust from reaching the miners' working environment...
Article
In conjunction with steady increases in production levels, long-wall operators have applied greater quantities of ventilating air to control respirable dust and methane gas. As a result, air velocities greater than 7.6 m/s (1500 fpm) have been measured on longwall faces. Operators have expressed concern over the potential entrainment of respirable...
Article
NIOSH's Pittsburgh Research Laboratory is currently involved in research to identify silica dust generation in underground metal/nonmetal mines. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop control technologies to reduce worker exposure to respirable silica dust. Commodities and job classifications with the highest silica dust exposure have bee...
Article
Full-text available
Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the silica collection efficiency of flooded-bed scrubbers using six different filter panel designs at two operating velocities. Test results indicated that reductions in filter density negatively impacted respirable dust collection. Silica collection efficiency for the least-dense filter was as much as 33...
Article
Although the number of operating longwall mining systems has remained relatively constant, longwall production levels during the last five years have increased significantly. In the United States, longwall mining now accounts for approximately 50% of all underground coal production. While longwalls are highly productive and offer other advantages,...
Article
Longwall mining operations continue to increase extraction rates and the potential to generate higher amounts of airborne respirable dust (ARD). The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has gathered data from underground longwall surveys and laboratory crushing tests to identify the important factors influencing the amount...
Article
Longwall mining is the most productive method of under- ground coal mining in the United States (U.S.), and record levels of production have been reached in recent years. These ever-im- proving production levels have the potential to generate signifi- cantly higher quantities of respirable dust. Consequently, the longwall industry continues to stru...
Article
Full-text available
As production levels continue to increase in underground coal operations in the United States, greater quantities of respirable dust are generated with the potential to increase worker exposure. Ventilating air and water spray systems continue to be the primary means of controlling respirable dust for both continuous mining and longwall mining oper...
Article
Full-text available
Average production from longwall mining operations in the United States has risen from approximately 800 tons per shift in 1980 to over 4,600 metric tons per shift in 1999. Such a large increase in production has the potential to generate significantly more dust. Previous NIOSH research has shown that, on average, respirable dust levels generated b...
Article
This work presents the findings from a number of NIOSH studies evaluating the impacts of emerging technologies that may reduce dust exposures for continuous mining and roof bolting personnel. These technologies include use of a wet head cutting drum on a continuous mining machine that places water sprays on the cutting drum instead of placing them...
Article
The importance of controlling respirable dust and methane gas levels in underground coal mining cannot be underestimated. While respirable dust can significantly affect the occupational health of underground coal miners, methane gas accumulations pose significant safety concerns for these same workers. Water sprays and machine mounted dust scrubber...
Article
As mining operations in the United States (US) have become more productive, con­ trolling the dust exposure of mine workers has become more challenging. In response, US mining operations are applying basic controls at elevated levels and are looking to emerging control tech­ nologies in an effort to better control airborne respirable dust levels. T...
Article
The Bureau of Mines conducted an exploratory field survey to determine the amount of airborne coal dust, the size distribution of the dust, and the rate of dust deposition in coal mine airways. The survey was taken at eight underground locations in operating coal mines. The rate of dust deposition in the airways depended upon the concentration of a...
Article
The contract objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust-control technology for double-drum shearers. Eight underground surveys were conducted to evaluate drum design, drum spray nozzle locations, ranging-arm sprays, water quantity, wetting agents, and cutting techniques. The final report is made up of eight dust-control technique...
Article
The Respiratory Hazards Control Branch of NIOSH routinely conducts laboratory and mine-site evaluations of dust control technologies. Gravimetric and instantaneous dust' sampling instruments are used in these evaluations to measure and document dust le- - vels to determine worker exposure. The Thermo personal DataRam (pDR) is an instan- taneous sam...
Article
The objective of the contract was to prepare a detailed, readily usable handbook on dust-control techniques for longwall-mining operations. Information was gathered from available literature and through contacts with industry and government personnel. The handbook describes those methods of dust control applicable to today's longwall-mining systems...
Article
Longwall mining in lower seam heights may necessitate the use of single drum shearers to overcome size constraints associated with standard double-drum shearers. In an effort to evaluate the unique dust control problems associated with this type of mining, the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted dust surveys on two multi-machine longwall operations. Sam...
Article
The U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a series of laboratory tests to investigate the effectiveness of using a flooded-bed scrubber with exhaust ventilation in deep-cut faces of up to 12.2 m in length. An experimental test program to determine the impact on respirable dust levels resulting from changes in face airflow, curtain setback distance, operat...
Article
Laboratory tests were conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to determine respirable dust reduction effectiveness of and interaction between face airflow and water sprays for a continuous miner. Increases in exhausting face ventilation from 3,000 to 9,000 cfm, in waterflow from 15 to 35 gpm, and in water nozzle operating pressure from 80 to 200 psi...
Article
Full-text available
The objectives of this investigation were to determine the amount, size, and deposition of float coal dust generated during the mining and transporting of coal in underground U.S. mining operations. Rock dust distributed by trickle dusters was also sampled. In addition to four belt-transfer points, two continuous and two conventional mining section...
Article
NIOSH conducted a strategic planning effort to identify those areas in mining with the greatest research needs. Data analysis and stakeholder input identified the need to reduce worker exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust as a high priority area. MSHA dust sampling data were analyzed to target the mining commodities and occupations with t...
Article
NIOSH's Pittsburgh Research Laboratory is currently involved in research to identify silica dust sources and generation in underground metal/nonmetal mines. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop control technologies to reduce worker exposure to respirable silica dust. Baseline dust surveys were conducted in underground limestone mines in...
Article
Underground coal mining operations in the United States continue to increase productivity as mining equipment and practices are improved. Unfortunately, increased production also results in the potential for increased respirable dust generation and worker exposure. In response, US operations are applying basic controls at elevated levels and lookin...

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