Javier Ruiz

Javier Ruiz
Biological Research Centre (CIB)

PhD

About

28
Publications
12,271
Reads
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776
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
775 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
April 2021 - present
Complutense University of Madrid
Position
  • PostDoc Position
December 2017 - April 2021
Complutense University of Madrid
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2015 - July 2016
Complutense University of Madrid
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
September 2015 - July 2016
Complutense University of Madrid
Field of study
  • Microbiology
September 2011 - July 2015
Complutense University of Madrid
Field of study
  • Sciences

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly fermentative species able to complete the wine fermentation. However, the interaction with other non-Saccharomyces yeasts can determine the fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae. We have characterised three rare non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Cyberlindnera fabianii, Kazachstania unispora and Naganishia globosa),...
Article
Wine fermentations are dominated by Saccharomyces yeast. However, dozens of non-Saccharomyces yeast genera can be found in grape musts and in the early and intermediate stages of wine fermentation, where they co-exist with S. cerevisiae. The diversity of non-Saccharomyces species is determinant for the sensorial attributes of the resulting wines, b...
Article
Full-text available
The adaptation to the different biotic and abiotic factors of wine fermentation has led to the accumulation of numerous genomic hallmarks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains. IRC7, a gene encoding a cysteine‐S‐β‐lyase enzyme related volatile thiols production in wines, has two alleles: a full‐length allele (IRC7F) and a mutated one (IRC7S), ha...
Chapter
Wine terroir, apart from a trending term with billionaire consequences, is an interesting research topic where agronomy, edaphology, ecology, biology and chemistry are required for its study. Thus, it is a unique research area for applying omics-based approaches. The key role that microorganisms play in vineyard health and yield, and in the perfor...
Article
Brettanomyces bruxellensis is among the main spoilage yeasts in wine usually found in oak barrels. As routine, laboratories at wineries use selective-differential culture media to detect this yeast. Nevertheless, it is widely recognized that other microbial species can grow on these media, getting false positive signals. In this work, we have devel...
Article
Nitrogen content of grape musts strongly impacts on fermentation performance and wine metabolite production. As nitrogen is a limiting nutrient in most grape musts, nitrogen supplementation is a common practice that en- sures yeast growth during fermentation. However, preferred nitrogen sources -as ammonium- repress the genes related to alternative...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, several non-Saccharomyces species have been used as an alternative yeast for producing wines with sensorial properties that are distinctive in comparison to those produced using only Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the classical inoculum. Among the non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts, Metschnikowia is one of the most investigated genera...
Article
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) is a food-grade budding yeast with ‘generally regarded as safe’ status. It has been used in the production of fermentative foods (bread), beverages (beer, wine, spirits), and biofuels. It is also used as a cell factory for the production of pharmaceutical and other important biochemical compounds. Harnessed...
Article
Full-text available
Although there are many chemical compounds present in wines, only a few of these compounds contribute to the sensory perception of wine flavor. This review focuses on the knowledge regarding varietal aroma compounds, which are among the compounds that are the greatest contributors to the overall aroma. These aroma compounds are found in grapes in t...
Article
Full-text available
In winemaking processes, there is a current tendency to develop spontaneous fermentations taking advantage of the metabolic diversity of derived from the great microbial diversity present in grape musts. This enological practice enhances wine complexity, but undesirable consequences or deviations could appear on wine quality. Soil is a reservoir of...
Chapter
Full-text available
In the past, Saccharomyces spp. yeasts were almost the only option for use in modern winemaking due to their unparalleled ability to metabolize all grape juice sugar into ethanol. For that reason, until some years ago, all commercial dry yeasts were Saccharomyces spp. For several years, non-Saccharomyces were forgotten at industrial level, and even...
Article
The microbial diversity of wine alcoholic fermentation is not restricted to the presence and activity of Saccharomyces yeast strains. Some non-Saccharomyces species have been described as part of the fermentative microbiota, specially found in the initial steps of wine fermentations. These species may play roles from wine spoilage to flavor quality...
Article
The use of commercial yeast strains is a common practice in winemaking leading to a predictable quality in wine production, avoiding stuck or sluggish fermentations. However, the use of commercial yeasts leads to a consequent reduction of autochthonous microbial diversity. In this study, one thousand and forty‐seven isolates from three Spanish appe...
Article
Full-text available
Most wine aroma compounds, including the varietal fraction, are produced or released during wine production and derived from microbial activity. Varietal aromas, typically defined as terpenes and thiols, have been described as derived from their non-volatile precursors, released during wine fermentation by different yeast hydrolytic enzymes. The pe...
Article
In last years, non-Saccharomyces yeasts have emerged as innovative tools to improve wine quality, being able to modify the concentration of sensory-impact compounds. Among them, varietal thiols released by yeasts, play a key role in the distinctive aroma of certain white wines. In this context, Torulaspora delbrueckii is in the spotlight because of...
Article
Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most important yeast species for the production of wine and other beverages. In addition, nowadays, researchers and winemakers are aware of the influence of non-Saccharomyces in wine aroma complexity. Due to the high microbial diversity associated to several agro-food processes, such as winemaking, developing fast an...
Article
Full-text available
The killer phenomenon is defined as the ability of some yeast to secrete toxins that are lethal to other sensitive yeasts and filamentous fungi. Since the discovery of strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of secreting killer toxins, much information has been gained regarding killer toxins and this fact has substantially contributed knowledge...
Article
Full-text available
Wine is a complex matrix that includes components with different chemical natures, the volatile compounds being responsible for wine aroma quality. The microbial ecosystem of grapes and wine, including Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts, as well as lactic acid bacteria, is considered by winemakers and oenologists as a decisive factor influe...
Article
The development of a selective medium for the rapid differentiation of yeast species with increased aromatic thiol release activity has been achieved. The selective medium was based on the addition of S-methyl-l-cysteine (SMC) as β-lyase substrate. In this study, a panel of 245 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was tested for their abilit...
Article
Full-text available
Non-Saccharomyces yeasts are a heterogeneous microbial group involved in the early stages of wine fermentation. The high enzymatic potential of these yeasts makes them a useful tool for increasing the final organoleptic characteristics of wines in spite of their low fermentative power. Their physiology and contribution to wine quality are still poo...
Article
Full-text available
Analyzing the influence of different yeast species on several compounds with enological interest, it becomes possible to identify metabolic determinants of the incidence of yeasts on wine quality. Contrary to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, understand- ing genetic regulation, enzymatic properties and physiology of non-Saccharomyces species in enological...

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