Jatinder Bhatia

Jatinder Bhatia
Augusta University · Department of Pediatrics (1)

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175
Publications
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Publications

Publications (175)
Article
Introduction The objectives of this retrospective cohort study were to examine the effect of vitamin K administration on hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications, blood product utilization, and outcomes in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Methods In the pilot study, complications, blood product use, and outcome data for neonate...
Article
Breast milk is considered the ideal and preferred feeding for all infants through the first 4-6 months of life. It provides many short and long-term benefits to the infant and mother. In the absence of breastfeeding, expressed breast milk is the best way to provide nutrition. In the United States, the majority of breastfeeding mothers express milk...
Article
Background Neurologic complications including hemorrhage, ischemia, and infarction are often identified in neonates undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and may contribute to the high morbidity observed in ECMO survivors. Screening for intracranial complications is reliant on bedside transcranial ultrasound (CUS) prior to and durin...
Article
Objective: To determine if umbilical cord milking performed on a cut umbilical cord segment increased the hemoglobin/hematocrit, with a reduction in the incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage, need for blood transfusions, and pressor requirement in infants with <35-weeks gestation. Study design: This was a single center, observational study in th...
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Background: Fruits and vegetables are key to a healthy diet, particularly in children; however, parents may be concerned about contaminants found in fruits and vegetables. Making informed food choices for children requires understanding and balancing the risks of contaminant exposure with the importance of providing a healthy diet. The objective of...
Article
The use of point‐of‐care sonography in clinical settings such as emergency medicine and intensive care units has increased, but adoption in neonatology has been slow. Unlike the focused assessment with sonography for trauma scan used in adults, a quick bedside scan to rapidly evaluate an acutely deteriorating neonate does not exist. The objective o...
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Iron deficiency (ID) affects 13.5% of 1–2 years old children in the US and may have a negative impact on neurodevelopment and behavior. Iron-fortified infant cereal is the primary non-heme iron source among infants aged 6–11.9 months. The objective of this study was to compare iron intakes of infant cereal users with non-users. Data from the Feedin...
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Background: The objective of this study was to assess complications and patient outcomes associated with a lower reflexive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion threshold for neonates undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for hypoxic respiratory failure. Study design and methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a single...
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Background: We sought to examine the effect of routine antithrombin III (AT3) infusion on hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications, blood product utilization, and circuit lifespan in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 162 infants placed on ECMO for hypoxic respiratory failur...
Article
Conventional treatment of respiratory failure involves positive pressure ventilation that can worsen lung damage. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is typically used when conventional therapy fails. In this study, we evaluated the use of venovenous (VV)-ECMO for the treatment of severe pediatric respiratory failure at our institution. A re...
Article
Treatment of gastroschisis often requires multiple surgical procedures to re-establish abdominal domain, reduce abdominal contents, and eventually close the abdominal wall. In patients who have concomitant respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), this process becomes further complicated. This situation is rare and o...
Article
Preterm infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW; <1000 g) infants, are susceptible to growth failure in postnatal life if nutritional demands are not met. Poor postnatal growth in preterm infants is associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes during childhood. Early parental nutrition i...
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CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for infants born to mothers with possible Zika virus infection during pregnancy (1). Laboratory testing is recommended for 1) infants born to mothers with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection during pregnancy and 2) infants who have abnormal clinical or neuroimaging f...
Article
Breastfeeding is universally accepted as the preferred feeding for all newborn infants, including premature infants. The World Health Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics, Canadian Pediatric Society and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, among others, recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the firs...
Article
Background: Invasive candidiasis (IC) is an important cause of sepsis in premature infants and is associated with a high risk of death and neurodevelopmental impairment. Prevention of IC has become a major focus in very low birth weight infants with fluconazole increasingly used as prophylaxis. Methods: We identified all randomized, placebo-cont...
Article
Newborns with ABO blood group incompatibility can have a spectrum of clinical presentations from remaining asymptomatic to severe hemolytic anemia with jaundice. This case presentation discusses dizygotic twins who demonstrated both ends of the clinical spectrum. Similar cases in which there is such extreme variation between twins were not attainab...
Article
Low birthweight (LBW) is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as body weight less than 2,500 g at birth based on epidemiological observations that infants with a birthweight less than 2,500 g are 20 times more likely to die than 'heavier' babies [1]. Moreover, according to the WHO, a birthweight below 2,500 g contributes to poor health ou...
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Hemolytic disease of the newborn continues to be a common neonatal disorder that requires a comprehensive understanding on the part of those caring for infants. Common treatments include hydration and phototherapy. Exchange transfusion is used in severe hemolytic disease, but infants undergoing this treatment are exposed to many adverse effects. In...
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Concern over childhood obesity has generated a decade-long reformation of school nutrition policies. Food is available in school in 3 venues: federally sponsored school meal programs; items sold in competition to school meals, such as a la carte, vending machines, and school stores; and foods available in myriad informal settings, including packed...
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Maria Panglao Rajan,1 Pinkal Patel,1 Lori Cash,1 Anjali Parish,2 Scott Darby,1 Jack Yu,3 Jatinder Bhatia11Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical Center of Central Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: This is an unusual case...
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AIM:: The aim of this review is to provide recommendations on the use of hydrolysates in infants when formula feeding is initiated. We performed an overview of reviews followed by a systematic review of subsequently published trials. We did find eight systematic reviews; only one study of limited quality was published afterwards. Certain extensivel...
Article
Sales of raw or unpasteurized milk and milk products are still legal in at least 30 states in the United States. Raw milk and milk products from cows, goats, and sheep continue to be a source of bacterial infections attributable to a number of virulent pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella species, Brucella s...
Article
Intestinal failure is the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements for maintenance and growth in children and adults. Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants, and results from surgica...
Article
Zinc and copper are essential for preterm infants, but recommended requirements from different groups vary widely. Recommended zinc intakes have steadily increased over the years. Although this would be expected to impair copper absorption, recommended copper intakes have not risen in parallel. To systematically review the literature on zinc and co...
Article
Optimal fetal growth resulting in a 'normally grown' term infant is of paramount importance for assuring a healthy start for postnatal growth and development. Fetal, infant and childhood growth restriction is an important clinical problem for obstetricians, neonatologists, pediatricians and globally, for public health. Worldwide, an estimated 20 mi...
Article
Requirements for optimal nutrition, especially for micronutrients, are not well defined for premature infants. The "reference fetus," developed by Ziegler et al, has served as a model to define nutritional needs and studies designed to determine nutrient requirements. Revision of nutrient requirements and provision of optimal nutrition may lead to...
Article
Birth weight is one of the most important anthropometric measures in the evaluation of an infant. For the full-term infant, birth weight is compared with reference or standard growth curves that are constructed by plotting weight, length, and head circumference against postnatal age. Following a similar approach for preterm infants is less effectiv...
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JPER is a multi-disciplinary journal that promotes the health of the preterm infant.
Conference Paper
Purpose : TPN is an integral part of the care of the premature neonate. We and others have previously demonstrated that admixture of solutions of amino acids, lipids, vitamins or additives is associated with a number of complications (hepatic dysfunction, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and generation of peroxides). Infused peroxides cause an oxidant...
Article
Full-text available
JPER is a multi-disciplinary journal that promotes the health of the preterm infant.
Article
Full-text available
To compare the effect of early extubation to nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) on the need for mechanical ventilation via endotracheal tube (MVET) at 7 days of age in preterm infants <30 weeks' gestation requiring intubation and surfactant for respiratory distress syndr...
Article
Soy infant formula contains soy protein isolates and is fed to infants as a supplement to or replacement for human milk or cow milk. Soy protein isolates contains estrogenic isoflavones (phytoestrogens) that occur naturally in some legumes, especially soybeans. Phytoestrogens are nonsteroidal, estrogenic compounds. In plants, nearly all phytoestrog...
Article
Full-text available
JPER is a multi-disciplinary journal that promotes the health of the preterm infant.
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The objective of this study is to compare all-cause in-hospital mortality in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) treated with poractant alfa, calfactant or beractant. Study Design: A retrospective cohort study of 14 173 preterm infants with RDS, treated with one of three surfactants between 2005 and 2009, using the...
Article
This is a commentary on a Cochrane review, published in this issue of EBCH, first published as: Bell EF, Acarregui MJ. Restricted versus liberal water intake for preventing morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2008, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD000503. DOI: 10.1002/14 651 858.CD000503.pub2. Further information...
Article
We report a rare case of a newborn with complete monosomy 21 prenatally diagnosed in the amniotic fluid and subsequently confirmed in other tissues. Patient presented with multiple osseous, cardiac, and vascular anomalies. Cardiac anomalies included large atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, aneurysm of the left pulmonary artery and pat...
Article
The provision of appropriate nutritional support is an essential part of the primary and adjunctive management of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in neonatology and pediatrics. Few conditions in neonatology pose as great a challenge as intestinal failure or short bowel syndrome (SBS). The latter, SBS, is a complex disorder affecting normal int...
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Asymptomatic term neonates born to mothers who are Group B Streptococcus (GBS) unknown or GBS positive but "inadequately" treated prior to delivery do not require invasive laboratory evaluation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of mother/baby dyads born from January 1, 2005 until September 30, 2007 at the Medical College of Georgia. Their...
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OBJECTIVE: Palivizumab reduces respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization in children at high risk by 50% compared with placebo. We compared the efficacy and safety of motavizumab, an investigational monoclonal antibody with enhanced anti-RSV activity in preclinical studies, with palivizumab. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, multinati...
Article
Few noise measurement studies in the neonatal intensive care unit have reported sound frequencies within incubators. Sound frequencies within incubators are markedly different from sound frequencies within the gravid uterus. This article reports the results of sound spectral analysis (SSA) within unoccupied incubators under control and treatment co...
Article
Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remain a serious problem for both preterm and term neonates with the spectrum of injury ranging from neuronal injury to encephalopathy and death. Neonatal encephalopathy due to such injury occurs in 3-9 of every 1000 term infants. Of these, it is estimated that nearly a third t...
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A global evidence-based consensus has defined gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as 'a condition, which develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications.' The manifestations of GERD can be divided into esophageal and extraesophageal syndromes, and include vomiting, poor weight gain, dysphagia, abdomi...
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The use of surfactant replacement, 'kinder gentler' modes of ventilation combined with prenatal corticosteroids have all played a role in improved survival rates of very-low-birth-weight infants but have not reduced the prevalence of chronic lung disease. The increased rates of prematurity being observed in the United States along with the increase...
Article
Uterine structures protect the fetus from high-frequency sounds (i.e., >500 Hz). Preterm infants are not protected from sound >500 Hz. It is necessary to assess sound frequencies to protect preterm infants from high-frequency sound. However, no noise measurement study has been reported using sound spectral analysis (SSA). This article reports the r...
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Soy protein-based formulas have been available for almost 100 years. Since the first use of soy formula as a milk substitute for an infant unable to tolerate a cow milk protein-based formula, the formulation has changed to the current soy protein isolate. Despite very limited indications for its use, soy protein-based formulas in the United States...
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Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a common emergency that carries high morbidity and mortality for extremely low birth weight infants. To date there have been no multicenter randomized controlled trials to evaluate different feeding strategies and NEC. Clinicians must weigh their experience against small amounts of data in deciding the best w...
Article
Nutrition for sick newborn infants, both term and preterm, has been evolving since the first published report of use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in an infant. The more preterm infants have posed an even greater challenge, because optimal timing for use of enteral nutrition is an additional factor for completing their nutritional demands. Al...
Article
Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is one of the most common congenital heart defects, accounting for 5%-10% of all congenital heart disease in term infants. The occurrence of PDA is inversely related to gestational age and weight, with an even greater incidence in preterm infants. The maintenance of ductal patency is essential for the normal developme...
Article
Human milk is the preferred feeding for both term and preterm infants. While being considered optimal for term infants, human milk, even from mothers delivering preterm infants, is lacking in protein, energy, sodium, calcium, and phosphorus, resulting in poorer growth and nutrient deficiencies when compared to formulas designed for these high-risk...
Article
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of newer therapies on the highest risk patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), those with agenesis of the diaphragm. CDH remains a significant cause of neonatal mortality. Many novel therapeutic interventions have been used in these infants. Those children with large defects or age...
Article
Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. If this transition fails, a condition called persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN) may develop. The current treatment modalities for this disease include induction of alkalosis by hyperventilation or alkali infusion, inhaled nitric...
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Fluid and electrolyte management in the very low birth weight infant is critical to survival. The amount of fluid present in the plasma, interstitial fluid, and cellular fluid changes throughout the fetal and neonatal period, presenting a challenging situation. One of the many factors influencing fluid requirements is the insensible water loss by m...
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The changing environment in neonatology and perinatology has led to the examination of issues surrounding palliative care. Newborn palliative care should be considered in three general areas: (1) Neonates at the limits of viability. As advances in technology and outcomes become available, it is the responsibility of the health-care community and so...
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Telemedicine has been a technological takeaway for the developed countries. Even in the developing countries, it is increasingly being viewed as a tool for improving care and enhancing access to healthcare. Countries like India where the majority of the population lives in rural areas, where healthcare facilities are inefficient and inadequate, too...
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The ever-increasing survival of premature and extremely low birth weight infants has posed a great challenge to neonatologists and nutritionists. While nutrient requirements are still being defined, there is a great need to continue to improve our strategies for providing effective nutrition for these infants. Similarly, postdischarge nutritional i...
Article
Therapeutic hypothermia holds promise as a rescue neuroprotective strategy for hypoxic-ischemic injury, but the incidence of severe neurologic sequelae with hypothermia is unknown in encephalopathic neonates who present shortly after birth. This study reports a multicenter, randomized, controlled, pilot trial of moderate systemic hypothermia (33 de...
Article
Hypoxic-ischemic injury may cause multisystem organ damage with significant aberrations in clotting, renal, and cardiac functions. Systemic hypothermia may aggravate these medical conditions, such as bradycardia and increased clotting times, and very little safety data in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury is available. This study reports a multicent...
Article
A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted to determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors with and without seizures. One hundred sixty-two ECMO survivors from March 1985 until November 1995 were eligible for follow-up. Sixty-four returned at preschool age (4-6 years). Thir...
Chapter
As perinatal medicine advances, the survival of premature infants at younger gestational ages is improving, and their special needs are becoming more complex. The responsibility for their long-term care has fallen on the primary care physician as well. These infants have ongoing issues with nutrition and growth, chronic lung disease, retinopathy of...
Article
s rated as "good" 79% of the time. Conclusion Echocardiograms captured as MPEG I files agreed with the clinical diagnosis and the original echocardiogram. This may be a low-cost alternative in pediatric care and needs to be considered in clinical use. INTRODUCTION Echocardiography provides important information for physicians in diagnosing heart di...
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To report the multidisciplinary developmental process of a comfort care guideline for the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) addressing palliative care measures in a tertiary academic medical center. The guideline was developed to be (1) practical, (2) family-centered, (3) respectful of the infant patient, and (4) educational. A consensus-building...
Article
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an uncommon but concerning condition for hospitalized premature infants. A retrospective chart review of all male infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from June 1996 through March 1999 was conducted at the Medical College of Georgia--a large academic medical center with a tertiary Level III NI...
Article
Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a common problem that affects premature infants and, to a lesser degree, term infants. Apnea of prematurity appears to be due to immaturity of the infant's neurologic and respiratory systems. Apnea of prematurity is a diagnosis of exclusion that can be made only when other possible infectious, cardiologic, physiologic,...