Jason A. Staples

Jason A. Staples
North Carolina State University | NCSU · Department of Philosophy & Religious Studies

Doctor of Philosophy

About

7
Publications
652
Reads
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13
Citations
Introduction
Assistant Teaching Professor in the Philosophy and Religious Studies Department at NC State University. Previously taught at Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, Wake Forest, and Florida State. Primary research on Early Judaism and Early Christianity. Currently finalizing a book on the apostle Paul's view of Israel.
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - May 2017
Duke University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2016 - present
North Carolina State University
Position
  • Lecturer
August 2016 - December 2016
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • Instructor
Education
August 2007 - December 2016
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Field of study
  • Religious Studies
August 2004 - May 2007
Florida State University
Field of study
  • Religion
August 2000 - May 2004
Florida State University
Field of study
  • Religion

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
In Rom 11:25–27, Paul triumphantly concludes his discussion of Israel’s fate: I do not want you to be ignorant, brothers, of this mystery (lest you become highminded yourselves)1 that a hardening has come upon a part of Israel2 until the fullness of the nations [τὸ πλήρωμα τῶν ἐθνῶν] has come in—and thus [καὶοὕτως]3 all Israel will be saved, just a...
Article
Despite numerous studies of the word κύριος (‘Lord’) in the New Testament, the significance of the double form κύριε κύριε occurring in Matthew and Luke has been overlooked, with most assuming the doubling merely communicates heightened emotion or special reverence. By contrast, this article argues that whereas a single κύριος might be ambiguous, t...
Article
Peter’s vision in Acts 10 ostensibly concerns dietary laws but is interpreted within the narrative as a revelation of God’s mercy towards the Gentiles, culminating in the baptism of Cornelius’ household. How this vision pertains to the immediately following events has remained a problem in scholarship on Acts. This article argues that the vision de...
Book
In this book, Jason Staples proposes a new paradigm regarding the biblical concept of Israel and how it shaped Jewish apocalyptic hopes for restoration after the Babylonian Exile. Challenging conventional assumptions about Israelite identity in antiquity, his argument is based on a close analysis of a vast corpus of biblical and other early Jewish...
Article
Starting from the concept of divine patience in Rom 9:22, this article argues that Paul employs the potter/clay metaphor not (as often interpreted) to defend God’s right to arbitrary choice but rather as an appeal to what Abraham Heschel called divine pathos—the idea that God’s choices are impacted by human actions. The potter/clay imagery in Rom 9...