Jason Sibold

Jason Sibold
Colorado State University | CSU · Department of Anthropology and Geography

About

41
Publications
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1,676
Citations

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
A changing climate is altering ecosystem carbon dynamics with consequences for natural systems and human economies, but there are few tools available for land managers to meaningfully incorporate carbon trajectories into planning efforts. To address uncertainties wrought by rapidly changing conditions, many practitioners adopt resistance and resili...
Article
Aim Fine‐scale topography and canopy cover can play an important role in mediating effects of regional‐scale climate change on the below‐canopy environment in mountain forests. The aim of this study was to determine how below‐canopy temperatures in a high‐elevation Rocky Mountain forest have been affected by canopy change resulting from severe wild...
Article
Full-text available
Historical fire regimes are critical for understanding the potential effects of changing climate and human land-use on forest landscapes. Fire is a major disturbance process affecting the Andean Araucaria forest landscape in north-west Patagonia. The main goals of this study were to reconstruct the fire history of the Andean Araucaria–Nothofagus fo...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The aim of the study was to investigate postfire regeneration patterns of Araucaria‐Nothofagus forests on the west slope of the Andes; to evaluate the relationship between remotely sensed burn severity and forest mortality; and to assess controls of burn severity on forest response at local spatio‐temporal scales. Location Araucanía region in...
Article
Full-text available
The Andes span a length of 7000 km and are important for sustaining regional water supplies. Snow variability across this region has not been studied in detail due to sparse and unevenly distributed instrumental climate data. We calculated snow persistence (SP) as the fraction of time with snow cover for each year between 2000 and 2016 from Moderat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods Fire is a primary disturbance agent in the Andean cordillera, and strongly influences the Araucaria-Nothofagus forests on the landscape. In Tolhuaca National Park, forests have been shaped by a mixed-severity fire regime over the last several centuries. Changes in land-use practices have influenced the fire regime during...
Article
Full-text available
Spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreaks are rapidly spreading throughout subalpine forests of the Rocky Mountains, raising concerns that altered fuel structures may increase the ecological severity of wildfires. Although many recent studies have found no conclusive link between beetle outbreaks and increased fire size or canopy mortality,...
Article
Full-text available
The Andes Mountains span a length of 7,000 km and are important for sustaining regional water supplies. Snow variability across this region has not been studied in detail due to sparse and unevenly distributed instrumental climate data. We calculated snow persistence (SP) as the fraction of time with snow cover for each year between 2000–2014 from...
Article
Rocky Mountain forests are highly important for their part in carbon cycling and carbon storage as well as ecosystem services such as water retention and storage and recreational values. These forests are shaped by complex interactions among vegetation, climate, and disturbances. Thus, climate change and shifting disturbances may lead to significan...
Article
Spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) outbreaks cause widespread mortality of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii (Parry ex Engelm)) within the subalpine forests of the western United States. Early detection of infestations could allow forest managers to mitigate outbreaks or anticipate a response to tree mortality and the potential effec...
Article
Do functional traits explain individual tree species’ responses to environmental filters and dispersal limitations following stand-replacing fire? Can post-fire conditions initiate alternate trajectories of community assembly? Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. We characterized the species composition of tree re-establishment following nine recen...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Native bark beetles are capable of causing widespread mortality during outbreak events in the forests of western North America. These disturbances can have vast effects on forest structure and there is concern that such changes could influence subsequent wildfire behavior and its impact on ecosystems. New research has co...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last decade, western North America has experienced the largest mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreak in recorded history, and Rocky Mountain forests have been severely impacted. Although bark beetles are indigenous to North American forests, climate change has facilitated the beetle's expansion into previously uns...
Article
Full-text available
This study develops a method for characterizing snow climatology in the Andes Mountains using the 8-day maximum binary snow cover product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer sensor. The objectives are to: (1) identify regions with similar snow patterns and (2) identify snow persistence zones within these regions. Within a study a...
Article
Full-text available
Drought has long been recognized as a driving mechanism in the forests of western North America and drought-induced mortality has been documented across genera in recent years. Given the frequency of these events are expected to increase in the future, understanding patterns of mortality and plant response to severe drought is important to resource...
Article
Recent severe and extensive mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae; MPB) outbreaks have created novel conditions in Southern Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine forests which historically had disturbance regimes dominated by extensive, stand-replacing fires. The goal of this study is to investigate patterns of and potential mechanisms in post-outb...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Drought-induced forest mortality has been documented across genera in recent years in western North America. Understanding patterns of mortality and plant response to severe drought is important to resource managers, given the frequency of these events are expected to increase in the future. Remote sensing studies have documented changes in forest...
Article
Full-text available
The availability of land cover data at local scales is an important component in forest management and monitoring efforts. Regional land cover data seldom provide detailed information needed to support local management needs. Here we present a transferable framework to model forest cover by major plant functional type using aerial photos, multi-dat...
Research
Full-text available
The objective of the proposed research was to investigate fire history in Grand Teton National Park (GRTE) with the goal of providing information on the use of wildfires to achieve resource objectives, and the potential implications of climate change for fire regimes and fire management. Whereas fires history studies often use only dendroecological...
Article
Full-text available
Vegetation processes in terrestrial ecosystems are closely linked with wildfire regime, but fire histories at the boundary between the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts of North America are relatively sparse. We investigated wildfire regime and its driving factors before and after Euro-American settlement in high-elevation mixed-conifer ecosystems tha...
Article
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Several methods are commonly used to determine the age of seedlings, and destructive aging methods are often assumed to be the most reliable. Terminal bud-scar counts can be used as a nondestructive alternative for aging seedlings, although clear criteria for which this method is appropriate are not well-known. This article evaluates the use of ter...
Article
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The Great Basin contains mountain woodlands characterized by a mixture of conifer species (mainly Pinus monophylla, Pinus ponderosa, and Juniperus osteosperma) whose interaction with wildland fire may be affected by climatic changes. To determine expected wildfire behavior at these semiarid mountain sites, we analyzed fuel conditions at Mount Irish...
Article
We investigated interannual and multidecadal variability in fire regimes, as related to climate and human land-use in Pike National Forest, central Colorado. Short and long-term trends in fire-scar records were related to tree-ring proxy records of moisture availability and to variability in El Niño – Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Fire occurrence is...
Article
Full-text available
In the Great Basin region of western North America, records of past climate and wildfire variability are needed not only for fire use, but also for understanding the mechanisms behind the century-long expansion of pinon-juniper woodlands. The Mt. Irish area (Lincoln County, south-eastern Nevada) is a remote mountain ecosystem on the hydrographic bo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We investigated climate, fire, and species dynamics before and after Euro-American settlement at two locations in Lincoln County, Nevada. Both the Mt. Irish and Clover Mountains sites are isolated high ranges in the southern Great Basin Desert, not far from the floristic boundary with the northern Mojave Desert. At Mt. Irish, non-scarred ponderosa...
Article
Fire is the prevalent disturbance in the Araucaria–Nothofagus forested landscape in south-central Chile. Although both surface and stand-replacing fires are known to characterize these ecosystems, the variability of fire severity in shaping forest structure has not previously been investigated in Araucaria–Nothofagus forests. Age structures of 16 s...
Article
Full-text available
Wildfire is a dynamic ecological process with spatial patterns that reflect multiple influences on fire occurrence and spread. We used weights of evidence techniques to model spatial patterns of wildfire occurrence in relation to landscape-scale drivers of fire in the southern Great Basin. Weights of evidence is a quantitative, data-driven, Bayesia...
Article
Full-text available
The present synthesis addresses key questions about several extreme fire events that occurred in the Nothofagus forest region of southern Argentina and Chile in the late 1990s and early 2000s: (1) are there historical precedents for the extent and severity of these recent wildfires? (2) To what extent can large, severe fires be attributed to influe...
Article
Although high-severity fire is the primary type of disturbance shaping the structure of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands in the southern Rocky Mountains, many post-fire stands are also affected by blowdown, low-severity surface fires, and/or outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae). The ecological effects of these seco...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the long-term dynamics of mountain landscapes that are influenced by large-scale natural and anthropogenic disturbances and a changing climate is a complex subject. In this study, a landscape-level ecological model was modified to this end. We describe the structure and evaluation of the fire sub-model of the new landscape model LandClim,...
Article
Aim An understanding of past relationships between fire occurrence and climate variability will help to elucidate the implications of climate-change scenarios for future patterns of wildfire. In the present study we investigate the relationships between subalpine-zone fire occurrence and climate variability and broad-scale climate patterns in the P...
Article
Aim The historical variability of fire regimes must be understood in the context of drivers of the occurrence of fire operating at a range of spatial scales from local site conditions to broad-scale climatic variation. In the present study we examine fire history and variations in the fire regime at multiple spatial and temporal scales for subalpin...
Article
Understanding the effect of variation in climate on large-fire occurrence across broad geographic areas is central to effective fire hazard assessment. The El Nino- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) affect winter tem- perature and precipitation regimes in western North America through mid-latitude tele- connectio...
Article
Aim In this study we examine fire history (i.e. c. 500 yr bp to present) of Araucaria–Nothofagus forests in the Andes cordillera of Chile. This is the first fire history developed from tree rings for an Araucaria–Nothofagus forest landscape. Location The fire history was determined for the Quillelhue watershed on the north side of Lanin volcano in...
Article
We investigated interannual and multidecadal variability in fire regimes, as related to climate and human land-use in Pike National Forest, central Colorado. Short and long-term trends in fire-scar records were related to tree-ring proxy records of moisture availability and to variability in El Nino - Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Fire occurrence is...
Article
Full-text available
Resource managers rely on knowledge of fire history to guide management decisions, but for the subalpine zone of the Colorado Front Range little information exists on fire history documenting changes in fire regimes over the past several centuries. We examined fire history at 13 high elevation sites in the Colorado Front Range to detect long-term t...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Fire is the most important disturbance influencing Araucaria-Nothofagus forest of south-central Chile. We are investigating the influence of burn severity on tree regeneration.
Project
We are addressing the ecological legacies of multiple disturbance events; if the severity of the 1970s mountain pine beetle outbreak had a measurable influence on burn severity in wildfires in the ensuing decades. The long-term perspective of this retrospective study is relevant to the future of our forests, as much of the current landscape impacted by the recent beetle outbreak is maturing.
Project
Little attention has been given to the effect of top down climatic controls on the condition of forest across the region, with respect to both dry periods and extreme drought years. We assessed the relationship between recent satellite imagery and the condition of vegetation on the ground; then backcast the relationship over the last thirty years to determine when and where change occurred. We hypothesized the long-term trajectory of forest condition could be used to highlight areas of forest that are resistant, persistent or vulnerable to severe drought. Our findings identify spatially explicit patterns of long-term trends anchored with ground based evidence which provides a long-term perspective for the resource management of this area.