Jason L. Robinson

Jason L. Robinson
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign | UIUC · Illinois Natural History Survey

PhD Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UT-Knoxville

About

26
Publications
12,299
Reads
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353
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
258 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - July 2014
Prairie Wildlife Research
Prairie Wildlife Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2012 - present
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • Aquatic Entomologist
May 2005 - December 2011
University of Tennessee
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
We describe a new species in the caddisfly genus Rhyacophila (Trichoptera: Rhyacophilidae) from the southern Cumberland Plateau of the United States. Rhyacophila dandaganu n. sp. is placed in the Rhyacophila lobifera Group from North America, the second known species in this group. The new species is distinguished from Rhyacophila lobifera Betten,...
Article
Full-text available
A new genus and species of fossil caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) from the Lower Eocene (Ypresian) Green River Formation of Colorado is described. Litholimnephilops yinani gen. et sp. nov. is the first adult caddisfly to be described from the Green River Formation, and is characterized by large adult body size, presence of ocelli, dark leg spines,...
Article
Full-text available
Benthic macroinvertebrates were washed from nearly 1000 federally endangered freshwater mussels that had been collected from Pennsylvania during a reintroduction project to 2 eastern Illinois streams. Most benthic macroinvertebrates collected were larvae of the Neophylax fuscus, but other caddisflies and segmented worms were also observed. No unocc...
Article
Full-text available
Among the greatest challenges facing the conservation of plants and animal species in protected areas are threats from a rapidly changing climate. An altered climate creates both challenges and opportunities for improving the management of protected areas in networks. Increasingly, quantitative tools like species distribution modeling are used to a...
Data
Abbreviations, locations and full names of 163 national parks in this study. (PDF)
Data
Climate footprint dynamics for 163 national parks. Footprints modeled under current and future climate conditions. Future climate conditions are derived from the 2050 HADCM3 emissions scenario a2a (accessed from BIOCLIM site Aug. 2011). (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
DNA barcoding was intended as a means to provide species-level identifications through associating DNA sequences from unknown specimens to those from curated reference specimens. Although barcodes were not designed for phylogenetics, they can be beneficial to the completion of the Tree of Life. The barcode database for Trichoptera is relatively com...
Article
Full-text available
The effective conservation of species requires some understanding of where populations occur in a landscape. Gaps in this knowledge base (the “Wallacean Shortfall” of some authors) may coincide with hotspots of diversity for different plant and animal species, requiring the cooperation of a number of different federal, state, local and non-governme...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Aquatic insect species distributions are often poorly known by researchers and even more poorly reported in the scientific literature, where "state lists" are a typical format for distributional data. We obtained and taxonomically verified over 20,000 unique specimen records for 145 species of stoneflies (Insecta: Plec...
Conference Paper
Understanding the natural distributions of aquatic species is critical for evaluating the biological conditions of streams and the impacts of climate changes. We compiled 5628 records of stonefly species in Midwest streams/rivers based on the collections of Illinois Natural History Survey and other institutions, and established a dataset for a rang...
Article
Full-text available
Ohio is an eastern USA state that historically was >70% covered in upland and mixed coniferous forest; about 60% of it glaciated by the Wisconsinan glacial episode. Its stonefly fauna has been studied in piecemeal fashion until now. The assemblage of Ohio stoneflies was assessed from over 4,000 records accumulated from 18 institutions, new collecti...
Article
Full-text available
Distributional records for 293 caddisfly species representing 22 families and 68 genera are reported from Kentucky along with information on taxonomy, flight period, habitat, and conservation status. Sixty-nine species represent new records for the Commonwealth. Kentucky's geographic regions are compared with respect to species richness. Distributi...
Article
Larvae of species in the caddisfly genus Diplectrona (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae) are morphologically variable and found in a variety of different lotic habitats across eastern N. America. DNA sequencing of a 658-base pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene revealed 7 haplotype groups within the genus Diplectrona : Fou...
Article
Full-text available
Distributional records for 293 caddisfly species representing 22 families and 68 genera are reported from Kentucky along with information on taxonomy, flight period, habitat, and conservation status. Sixty-nine species represent new records for the Commonwealth. Kentucky's geographic regions are compared with respect to species richness. Distributi...
Article
Full-text available
Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) barcoding is an effective tool for species identification and life- stage association in a wide range of animal taxa. We developed a strategy for rapid construction of a regional DNA-barcode reference library and used the caddisflies (Trichoptera) of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) as a model. Nearly 1000...
Article
Full-text available
A bio-blitz survey of the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPTs) of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, was conducted in the spring of 2007, with an emphasis on establishing a DNA barcode reference library for the three orders. Fourty six Ephemeroptera, fourty three Plecoptera, and eighty four Trichoptera species were collected duri...
Article
Full-text available
Information is presented on 348 Trichoptera (caddisfly) species recorded from North Carolina, including 76 new state records. This information includes distribution across 4 ecoregions, occurrence by stream size, and the 1st published North Carolina record for each species.
Article
Full-text available
We examine patterns in fish species assemblages in the Toxaway and Horsepasture rivers, two high elevation streams in North Carolina, USA. This region is noted for extreme topographical relief, high cumulative annual rainfall and many rare and endemic plants and animals. The study area encompasses a portion of the Blue Ridge Escarpment and the asso...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
The "Lock and Key Hypothesis" is a simple model for how different lineages or populations accomplish reproductive isolation.  Since many species are poorly known except as museum specimens, particularly for arthropods, morphological characters of the genitalia are often the primary basis by which species are delimited in these taxa.  The molecular revolution has been poised to reorganize our understanding of relationships between populations, or individuals even, and thus could drastically alter the interpretation of "what is a key" and "what is a lock" to include life history or behavior.  I am interested in feedback from taxonomists and systematists who regularly work from these ideas.

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Rebuild pre-European settlement ranges for stonefly species inhabiting the Midwest of the USA (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin). Over 30,000 specimen records are being used to model the past distributions of species across this large area.
Project
The Trichoptera Barcode of Life (TBOL) project aims to build a comprehensive COI barcode reference library for the caddisflies of the world. With 15,000 described species, and probably another 15,000 to be discovered, trichopterans represent the largest freshwater insect order. Because of their cosmopolitan distribution and widely variable ecological adaptation, these insects are regularly used in freshwater biomonitoring programs. The TBOL project is a global initiative with strong supports from the Trichoptera research community. Started in 2007, we now have barcode coverage for all trichopteran families, 2/3 of the genera and 1/3 of described species. This ever growing database has seen strong applications in species diagnosis, life-stage association, phylogenetic reconstruction, biomonitoring and biodiversity programs.