Jason Mattingley

Jason Mattingley
The University of Queensland | UQ · Queensland Brain Institute and School of Psychology

PhD

About

455
Publications
53,635
Reads
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17,884
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2011 - January 2012
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Visiting Scientist
August 1994 - August 1997
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 1994 - August 1997
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (455)
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans have well-documented priors for many features present in nature that guide visual perception. Despite being putatively grounded in the statistical regularities of the environment, scene priors are frequently violated due to the inherent variability of visual features from one scene to the next. However, these repeated violations do not appre...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to make accurate and timely decisions, such as judging when it is safe to cross the road, is the foundation of adaptive behaviour. While the computational and neural processes supporting simple decisions on isolated stimuli have been well characterised, in the real world decision-making often requires integration of discrete sensory eve...
Preprint
Many everyday tasks require us to integrate information from multiple steps to make a decision. Dominant accounts of flexible cognition suggest that we are able to navigate such complex tasks by attending to each step in turn, yet few studies measure how we direct our attention to immediate and future task steps. Here, we used a two-step task to te...
Article
Full-text available
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a rapidly expanding field of study and require accurate and reliable real-time decoding of patterns of neural activity. These protocols often exploit selective attention, a neural mechanism that prioritises the sensory processing of task-relevant stimulus features (feature-based attention) or task-relevant spati...
Article
Invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation methods are widely used in neuroscience to establish causal relationships between distinct brain regions and the sensory, cognitive and motor functions they subserve. When combined with concurrent brain imaging, such stimulation methods can reveal patterns of neuronal activity responsible for regulating s...
Article
Full-text available
The folk psychological notion that “we see what we expect to see” is supported by evidence that we become consciously aware of visual stimuli that match our prior expectations more quickly than stimuli that violate our expectations. Similarly, “we see what we want to see,” such that more biologically-relevant stimuli are also prioritised for consci...
Article
Equilibrium between excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) is key to healthy brain function. Conversely, disruption of normal E/I balance has been implicated in a range of central neurological pathologies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive means of quantifying in vivo concentrations of excitatory and inhibitory neurotra...
Article
Van der Groen, O., Potok, W., Wenderoth, N., Edwards., G., Mattingley, J.B. and Edwards, D. Using noise for the better: the effects of transcranial random noise stimulation on the brain and behavior. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV X (X) XXX-XXX 2021.- Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) is a non-invasive electrical brain stimulation method that is...
Article
Visual working memory refers to the temporary maintenance and manipulation of task-related visual information. Recent debate on the underlying neural substrates of visual working memory has focused on the delay period of relevant tasks. Persistent neural activity throughout the delay period has been recognized as a correlate of working memory, yet...
Article
Full-text available
The exponential rise in technology use over the past decade, and particularly during the COIVD-19 pandemic, has been accompanied by growing concern regarding the consequences of this technology use for our cognition. Previous studies on the influence of technology-multitasking (the use of two or more technologies simultaneously) on cognitive perfor...
Article
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The ability to change initial decisions in the face of new or potentially conflicting information is fundamental to adaptive behavior. From perceptual tasks to multiple-choice tests, research has shown that changes of mind often improve task performance by correcting initial errors. Decision makers must, however, strike a balance between improvemen...
Article
Highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) is characterised by the ability to recall personal events, dates, and news events from long-term memory with profound detail and accuracy. Anecdotes from these individuals suggest that retrieval of rich autobiographical detail is automatic, and often intrusive rather than effortful. We created two nove...
Preprint
Spatial cues that mismatch the colour of a subsequent target have recently been shown to slow responses to that target. The source of this ‘same location cost’ (SLC) is currently unknown. Two potential sources are attentional signal suppression and object-file updating. Here, we tested these accounts by reanalysing data from a previously published...
Article
Full-text available
The sensitivity of the human visual system is thought to be shaped by environmental statistics. A major endeavor in vision science, therefore, is to uncover the image statistics that predict perceptual and cognitive function. When searching for targets in natural images, for example, it has recently been proposed that target detection is inversely...
Chapter
Clinical examinations and neuroimaging investigations have dramatically changed the prevailing view of human cerebellar function and suggest contributions beyond movement control. Of these new views, perhaps the most intriguing proposal is that the cerebellum plays a key role in regulating emotion. According to the dysmetria of thought theory, the...
Article
Full-text available
A general consensus persists that sensory-perceptual differences in autism, such as hypersensitivities to light or sound, result from an overreliance on new (rather than prior) sensory observations. However, conflicting Bayesian accounts of autism remain unresolved as to whether such alterations are caused by more precise sensory observations (prec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Bayesian models of autism suggest that disruptions in context-sensitive prediction error weighting may underpin sensory perceptual alterations, such as hypersensitivities. We used an auditory oddball paradigm with pure tones arising from high or low uncertainity contexts to determine whether autistic individuals display differences in context adjus...
Preprint
Full-text available
The efficiency of sensory coding is affected both by past events (adaptation) and by expectation of future events (prediction). Here we employed a novel visual stimulus paradigm to determine whether expectation influences orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex. We used two-photon calcium imaging (GCaMP6f) in awake mice viewing visual...
Article
Integrating evidence from multiple sources to guide decisions is something humans do on a daily basis. Existing research suggests that not all sources of information are weighted equally in decision-making tasks, and that observers are subject to biases in the face of internal and external noise. Here we describe two experiments that measured obser...
Preprint
Full-text available
The efficiency of sensory coding is affected both by past events (adaptation) and by expectation of future events (prediction). Here we employed a novel visual stimulus paradigm to determine whether expectation influences orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex. We used two-photon calcium imaging (GCaMP6f) in awake mice viewing visual...
Preprint
Full-text available
A general consensus persists that sensory-perceptual differences in autism, such as hypersensitivities to light or sound, result from an overreliance on new (rather than prior) sensory observations. However, conflicting Bayesian accounts of autism remain unresolved as to whether such alterations are caused by more precise sensory observations (prec...
Preprint
Previous history of activity and learning modulates synaptic plasticity and can lead to saturation of synaptic connections. According to the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis, neural oscillations during slow-wave sleep play an important role in restoring plasticity within a functional range. However, it is not known whether slow-wave oscillations - w...
Article
Full-text available
Complex perceptual decisions, in which information must be integrated across multiple sources of evidence, are ubiquitous but are not well understood. Such decisions rely on sensory processing of each individual source of evidence, and are therefore vulnerable to bias if sensory processing resources are disproportionately allocated among visual inp...
Article
Many decisions, from crossing a busy street to choosing a profession, require integration of discrete sensory events. Previous studies have shown that integrative decision-making favours more reliable stimuli, mimicking statistically optimal integration. It remains unclear, however, whether reliability biases operate even when they lead to suboptim...
Article
Full-text available
It is often necessary for individuals to coordinate their actions with others. In the real world, joint actions rely on the direct observation of co-actors and rhythmic cues. But how are joint actions coordinated when such cues are unavailable? To address this question, we recorded brain activity while pairs of participants guided a cursor to a tar...
Preprint
Full-text available
The sensitivity of the human visual system is thought to be shaped by environmental statistics. A major endeavour in visual neuroscience, therefore, is to uncover the image statistics that predict perceptual and cognitive function. When searching for targets in natural images, for example, it has recently been proposed that target detection is inve...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives. This research examined whether brief sessions of mindfulness meditation (MM) or self-hypnosis (HYP) produce changes in cold pressor task (CPT) outcomes and whether outcome improvement, when it occurs, is mediated by attentional processes (i.e., pain focus, mindful observing) or pain appraisals (i.e., threat, challenge). Methods. Healthy...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial navigation is a crucial everyday skill, which when impaired leads to a significant decrease in quality of life. In humans, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has provided extensive insights into the neural underpinnings of navigation skills. Whereas the hippocampus has been recognized as the prime region underpinning navigation ab...
Article
Objective: Psychological treatments for chronic low back pain (CLBP) are effective. However, limited research has investigated their neurophysiological mechanisms. This study examined electroencephalography- (EEG-) assessed brain oscillation changes as potential mechanisms of cognitive therapy (CT), mindfulness-meditation (MM), and mindfulness-bas...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive training and brain stimulation show promise for ameliorating age-related neurocognitive decline. However, evidence for this is controversial. In a Registered Report, we investigated the effects of these interventions, where 133 older adults were allocated to four groups (left prefrontal cortex anodal transcranial direct current stimulatio...
Article
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to improve single- and dual-task performance in healthy participants and enhance transferable training gains following multiple sessions of combined stimulation and task-practice. However, it has yet to be determined what the optimal stimulation dose is for facilitating such outcomes. We...
Article
Full-text available
Areas in frontoparietal cortex have been shown to be active in a range of cognitive tasks and have been proposed to play a key role in goal-driven activities (Dosenbach, N. U. F., Fair, D. A., Miezin, F. M., Cohen, A. L., Wenger, K. K., Dosenbach, R. A. T., et al. Distinct brain networks for adaptive and stable task control in humans. Proceedings o...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been widely used in human cognitive neuroscience to examine the causal role of distinct cortical areas in perceptual, cognitive and motor functions. However, it is widely acknowledged that the effects of focal cortical stimulation can vary substantially between participants and even from trial to trial wi...
Article
Objectives: This study evaluated theoretically derived mechanisms and common therapeutic factors to test their role in accounting for pain-related outcome change during group-delivered cognitive therapy (CT), mindfulness meditation (MM) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for chronic low back pain. Methods: A secondary analysis of a p...
Article
Full-text available
Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective cation channel, broadly expressed throughout the body. Despite its expression in the mammalian brain, little is known about the contribution of TRPA1 to cortical function. Here, we characterize how TRPA1 affects sensory information processing in two cortical areas in mice: the primar...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to select and combine multiple sensory inputs in support of accurate decisions is a hallmark of adaptive behaviour. Attentional selection is often needed to prioritize task-relevant stimuli relative to irrelevant, potentially distracting stimuli. As most studies of perceptual decision-making to date have made use of task-relevant stimul...
Article
Full-text available
When attending to visual objects with particular features, neural processing is typically biased toward those features. Previous work has suggested that maintaining such feature-based attentional sets may involve the same neural resources as visual working memory. If so, the extent to which feature-based attention influences stimulus processing sho...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that prediction and attention can interact under various circumstances, suggesting that the two processes are based on interdependent neural mechanisms. In the visual modality, attention can be deployed to the location of a task-relevant stimulus (‘spatial attention’) or to a specific feature of the stimulus, such as colou...
Article
Our ability to track the paths of multiple visual objects moving between the hemifields requires effective integration of information between the two cerebral hemispheres. Coherent neural oscillations in the gamma band (35-70 Hz) are hypothesised to drive this information transfer. Here we manipulated the need for interhemispheric integration using...
Article
Applying a weak electrical current to the cortex has the potential to modulate neural functioning and behaviour. The most common stimulation technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), has been used for causal investigations of brain and cognitive functioning, and to treat psychiatric conditions such as depression. However, the effic...
Article
Full-text available
The human brain is inherently limited in the information it can make consciously accessible. When people monitor a rapid stream of visual items for two targets, they typically fail to see the second target if it occurs within 200–500 ms of the first, a phenomenon called the attentional blink (AB). The neural basis for the AB is poorly understood, p...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective cation channel, which is broadly expressed throughout the body. Despite its expression in the mammalian cortex, little is known about the contribution of TRPA1 to cortical function. Here we investigate the role of TRPA1 in sensory information processing by performing electrophysiolog...
Article
Full-text available
Free communication is one of the cornerstones of modern civilisation. While manual keyboards currently allow us to interface with computers and manifest our thoughts, a next frontier is communication without manual input. Brain-computer interface (BCI) spellers often achieve this by decoding patterns of neural activity as users attend to flickering...
Preprint
Full-text available
Our ability to track the paths of multiple visual objects moving between the hemifields requires effective integration of information between the two cerebral hemispheres. Coherent neural oscillations in the gamma band (35−70 Hz) are hypothesised to drive this information transfer. Here we manipulated the need for interhemispheric integration using...
Preprint
Full-text available
Decision making is a ubiquitous cognitive process that determines choice behaviour. In recent years there has been increased interest in how information about multiple discrete sensory events are combined in support of single, integrated decisions. Previous studies have shown that integrative decision-making is biased in favour of more reliable sti...
Article
Cognitive activity emerges from large-scale neuronal dynamics that are constrained to a low-dimensional manifold. How this low-dimensional manifold scales with cognitive complexity, and which brain regions regulate this process, are not well understood. We addressed this issue by analyzing sub-second high-field fMRI data acquired during performance...
Article
Transcranial electrical brain stimulation (tES) techniques have shown substantial promise in research and applied settings. However, over the last few years the technique has courted significant controversy, resulting in scepticism regarding its reported beneficial effects and future potential. In this opinion article, we examine the key points of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown that prediction and attention can interact under various circumstances, suggesting that the two processes are based on interdependent neural mechanisms. In the visual modality, attention can be deployed to the location of a task-relevant stimulus (‘spatial attention’) or to a specific feature of the stimulus, such as colou...
Article
Applying a weak electrical current to the cortex can have effects on a range of behaviours. Techniques such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have been widely used in both research and clinical settings. However, there is significant variability across individuals in terms of their responsiveness to stimulation, which poses practica...
Article
Full-text available
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2006812.].
Preprint
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been widely used in human cognitive neuroscience to examine the causal role of distinct cortical areas in perceptual, cognitive and motor functions. However, it is widely acknowledged that the effects of focal cortical stimulation on behaviour can vary substantially between participants and even from tria...
Article
This study examined psychosocial pain treatment moderation in a secondary analysis of a trial that compared cognitive therapy (CT), mindfulness-meditation (MM), and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The Limit, Activate, and Enhance (LA&E) model of moderation provided a framework for testing a priori hypoth...
Article
Full-text available
The Latin Square Task (LST) is a relational reasoning paradigm developed by Birney, Halford, and Andrews (2006). Previous work has shown that the LST elicits typical reasoning complexity effects, such that increases in complexity are associated with decrements in task accuracy and increases in response times. Here we modified the LST for use in fun...
Preprint
Full-text available
The human brain is inherently limited in the information it can make consciously accessible. When people monitor a rapid stream of visual items for two targets, they can typically report the first, but not the second target, if these appear within 200-500 ms of each other, a phenomenon known as the attentional blink (AB). No extant theory has pinpo...
Article
Objective: This study evaluated the behavioral inhibition and activation system (BIS-BAS) model of pain. Frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) as a possible neurophysiological correlate of the BIS-BAS was also explored, as was the role of personality factors. Research method: A cross-sectional study was completed at the University of (The University of...
Preprint
Full-text available
When different visual stimuli are presented to the two eyes, they typically compete for access to conscious perception, a phenomenon known as binocular rivalry. Previous studies of binocular rivalry have shown that neural responses to consciously suppressed stimuli are markedly diminished in magnitude, though they may still be encoded to some exten...
Article
Full-text available
Random noise can enhance the detectability of weak signals in nonlinear systems, a phenomenon known as stochastic resonance (SR). This concept is not only applicable to single threshold systems but can also be applied to dynamical systems with multiple attractor states, such as observed during the phenomenon of binocular rivalry. Binocular rivalry...
Article
Our perception of illusory shapes, such as the classic Kanizsa triangle, is thought to reflect the visual system's capacity to fill in missing information associated with fragmented or partially occluded objects. Previous work has suggested that such ‘modal’ filling-in arises at relatively early stages of visual processing, prior to the allocation...
Article
There is now considerable evidence that applying a small electrical current to the cerebral cortex can have wide ranging effects on cognition and performance, and may provide substantial benefit as a treatment for conditions such as depression. However, there is variability across subjects in the extent to which stimulation modulates behaviour, pro...
Article
Under natural viewing conditions, visual stimuli are often obscured by occluding surfaces. To aid object recognition, the visual system actively reconstructs the missing information, as exemplified in the classic Kanizsa illusion, a phenomenon termed “modal completion”. Single-cell recordings in monkeys have shown that neurons in early visual corte...
Article
Full-text available
The encoding of sensory information in the human brain is thought to be optimised by two principal processes: ‘prediction’ uses stored information to guide the interpretation of forthcoming sensory events, and ‘attention’ prioritizes these events according to their behavioural relevance. Despite the ubiquitous contributions of attention and predict...
Data
Independent main effects of attention and prediction on orientation response profiles, showing standards, deviants, and controls. (A) Main effect of attention on orientation response profiles. The amplitude of attended gratings was larger than that of ignored gratings (219–550 ms, cluster-corrected p = 0.001). Shading denotes standard error of the...