Jason Gilchrist

Jason Gilchrist
Edinburgh Napier University · School of Applied Sciences

PhD (Zoology, University of Cambridge)

About

31
Publications
6,720
Reads
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1,135
Citations
Introduction
I am a behavioural ecologist, interested in how the natural world works & how we can better look after it. Fieldwork in South Africa studied stress physiology of ungulates undergoing capture/kill to improve welfare & productivity. My interest in social dynamics has lead me to study reproduction & care of young in banded mongoose & group dynamics of chimpanzee (Uganda), pup care in grey mouse lemurs & behaviour of social spiders (Madagascar). See www.jasongilchrist.co.uk/research.html.
Additional affiliations
August 2004 - present
Edinburgh Napier University
Position
  • Ecologist & Lecturer
Description
  • BSc Animal Biology - Animal Behaviour; Physiology & Environment; Life on Earth; Human & Ecosystem Health; Applied Terrestrial Ecology / MSc Wildlife Biology & Conservation - Biodiversity & Conservation; Scientific Methods; Scotland Fieldcourse
August 2004 - present
Edinburgh Napier University
Position
  • Ecologist & Lecturer
Description
  • Stress Physiology of South Africa Ungulates; Behavioural Ecology of Banded Mongoose, Grey Mouse Lemur, Social Spiders (latter 2 species with fieldwork in Kirindy Forest, Madagascar).
August 2004 - December 2017
Edinburgh Napier University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
August 1997 - August 2001
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Behavioural Ecology
October 1989 - June 1993
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
Most cooperatively breeding species exhibit high reproductive skew, where reproduction within the social group is monopolized by a dominant pair. In many of these species, social control of reproduction is the mechanism driving reproductive skew: individuals within the social group actively reduce the reproductive success of others. In species wher...
Article
Full-text available
Socialization of young is an important component of maternal care in social mammals. It is therefore perplexing that female chimpanzees with dependent offspring spend more time alone than females without dependent offspring, and than males. We propose that chimpanzee mothers are less gregarious than nonmothers and males to reduce the risk of injury...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of food availability and distribution on population dynamics have been the subject of numerous experimental studies, but no study has quantified the effects of a concentrated supplementary food supply on groups of a social carnivore. We investigated the effects of refuse-feeding at garbage dumps on banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) groups....
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Comprehensive, global information on species' occurrences is an essential biodiversity variable and central to a range of applications in ecology, evolution, biogeography and conservation. Expert range maps often represent a species' only available distributional information and play an increasing role in conservation assessments and macroeco...
Article
Full-text available
The research presented in this paper provides an insight into the behavioral ecology of mountain hares on heather moorland in the Lammermuir Hills of southeast Scotland. We examine the seasonal and diel activity patterns using camera traps over a period of 12 months. The rate of camera detections was calculated for the different divisions of the 24...
Article
Full-text available
Kin selection theory predicts that animals should direct costly care where inclusive fitness gains are highest. Individuals may achieve this by directing care at closer relatives, yet evidence for such discrimination in vertebrates is equivocal. We investigated patterns of cooperative care in banded mongooses, where communal litters are raised by a...
Data
Supplementary Information for Vitikainen et al. 2017, pup escorting in the banded mongoose
Article
Full-text available
Kin selection theory predicts that, where kin discrimination is possible, animals should typically act more favorably toward closer genetic relatives and direct aggression toward less closely related individuals. Contrary to this prediction, we present data from an 18-y study of wild banded mongooses, Mungos mungo, showing that females that are mor...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Banded Mongoose is listed as Least Concern as, although its distribution is restricted to the northeast of the assessment region, it is generally common in suitable habitat and is present in several protected areas. There are no major threats that could cause range-wide population decline. Accidental persecution through poisoning, controlled bu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Listed as Least Concern because the species has no major threats, has a wide distribution range, is generally common in suitable habitat, occurs in several protected areas, and adapts well to human habitation.
Article
Full-text available
Oxidative damage has been proposed as a potential mechanism underlying a life history tradeoff between survival and reproduction. However, evidence that reproduction is associated with increased oxidative damage is equivocal, and some studies have found that breeding females exhibit reduced, rather than elevated, levels of oxidative damage compared...
Article
Full-text available
In many vertebrate societies, forced eviction of group members is an important determinant of population structure, but little is known about what triggers eviction. Three main explanations are: (i) the reproductive competition hypothesis, (ii) the coercion of cooperation hypothesis, and (iii) the adaptive forced dispersal hypothesis. The last hypo...
Article
Full-text available
Home range size and overlap in adult (> 4.5 years) and subadult (< 4.5 years) great spotted kiwi (Apteryx haastii) was investigated using telemetry at the Rotoiti Nature Recovery Project, Nelson Lakes National Park, in 2012. The population had been introduced between 2004 and 2006. The mean home range size of adults was 34.4 ha (± 9.4 SEM) and 17.4...
Article
Full-text available
Social species show considerable variation in the extent to which dominant females suppress subordinate reproduction. Much of this variation may be influenced by the cost of active suppression to dominants, who may be selected to balance the need to maximize the resources available for their own offspring against the costs of interfering with subor...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable research has focused on understanding variation in reproductive skew in cooperative animal societies, but the pace of theoretical development has far outstripped empirical testing of the models. One major class of model suggests that dominant individuals can use the threat of eviction to deter subordinate reproduction (the 'restraint'...
Article
Full-text available
This study evaluates the potential impacts of the release of the giant tortoise, Dipsochelys arnoldi, to vacant habitat within the species’ presumed historic range. Five individuals (3 males and 2 females) were released in December 2006 in the isolated Grande Barbe area of Silhouette Island, Seychelles. A comprehensive vegetation survey of all plan...
Article
Full-text available
Competition between young of the same brood or litter is of particular interest in the fields of behavioural and evolutionary ecology, because the competing individuals are likely to be closely related, where evolutionary theory predicts a greater degree of cooperation. Studies of cooperative breeding species typically concentrate on who contribute...
Article
In research on parental care and cooperative breeding an issue is whether caregivers recognize individual young and therefore preferentially care for those young that will maximize inclusive fitness gains. This field study experimentally evaluates whether caregivers within groups of the cooperative breeding banded mongoose (a communal breeding spec...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the investment rules adopted by breeders and non-breeders, and the factors that affect them, is essential to understanding cooperative breeding as part of a life-history tactic. Although the factors that affect relative contributions to care of young have been studied in some cooperative bird species, there is little data on mammals, m...
Article
Full-text available
In most cooperatively breeding species, reproduction is monopolised by a subset of group members. However, in some species most or all individuals breed. The factors that affect reproductive success in such species are vital to understanding why multiple females breed. A key issue is whether or not the presence of other breeders is costly to an ind...
Article
Full-text available
In cooperatively breeding species, helpers typically provide food to offspring, and distribute food throughout the brood or litter. However, in the communal breeding banded mongoose (Mungos mungo), some group members escort individual pups during their period of dependence, and escorts consistently associate with the same pup, although not all pups...
Article
Full-text available
We investigated the effect of refuse feeding on body condition, reproductive success, and survival in banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). Data were collected from 231 mongooses in 3 refuse-feeding groups and 311 mongooses in 8 non-refuse-feeding groups within Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. Refuse-feeding adults were heavier and in better physi...
Article
Full-text available
Fecundity is an important component of fitness. In cooperatively breeding species, studies aimed at understanding the factors that affect fecundity have largely been restricted to species that exhibit high reproductive skew, where reproduction is monopolised by a few individuals. In such species, dominant suppression and inbreeding avoidance are th...
Article
Reproductive isolation between two taxa may be due to endogenous selection, which is generated by incompatibilities between the respective genomes, to exogenous selection, which is generated by differential adaptations to alternative environments, or to both. The continuing debate over the relative importance of either mode of selection has highlig...
Article
Reproductive isolation between two taxa may be due to endogenous selection, which is generated by incompatibilities between the respective genomes, to exogenous selection, which is generated by differential adaptations to alternative environments, or to both. The continuing debate over the relative importance of either mode of selection has highlig...
Article
Full-text available
Mechanisms which prevent gene flow will maintain differentiation between species, and therefore contribute to biological diversity. We describe an experimental study of such mechanisms in a hybrid zone between the fire-bellied toad Bombina bombina and the yellow-bellied toad B. variegata. In this system, preference for different breeding habitats r...
Article
Observations on the means, variances, and covariances of quantitative traits across hybrid zones can give information similar to that from Mendelian markers. In addition, they can identify particular traits through which the cline is maintained. We describe a survey of six traits across the hybrid zone between Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata...
Article
Observations on the means, variances, and covariances of quantitative traits across hybrid zones can give information similar to that from Mendelian markers. In addition, they can identify particular traits through which the cline is maintained. We describe a survey of six traits across the hybrid zone between Bombina bombina and Bombina variegata...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
This project page will list all the conservation assessments on carnivores (order Carnivora) prepared for the 2016 Red List of Mammals of South Africa, Swaziland and Lesotho. The final version of each account (with correct, final page numbers) – as published in the upcoming ebook – will be made available at a later stage. Thanks for your patience!