Jason Dyck

Jason Dyck
The University of Western Ontario | UWO · Western Libraries

Doctor of Philosophy

About

40
Publications
832
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Citations
Introduction
Jason Dyck is a Teaching and Learning Librarian at the University of Western Ontario and a Sessional Instructor at Carleton University and Wilfrid Laurier University. His research focuses on colonial religion, missionary work, and sacred history in the early modern Spanish world. He is currently working on a book manuscript on the life and writings of Francisco de Florencia and a transcription project on the missionary histories of Juan de Albizuri.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Trent University
Position
  • Instructor
August 2015 - June 2017
University of Toronto
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2013 - May 2015
Trent University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
September 2004 - April 2012
University of Toronto
Field of study
  • History
September 2002 - August 2003
Queen's University
Field of study
  • History
September 1998 - May 2002
Brock University
Field of study
  • History and Philosophy

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
The Zodíaco mariano is a well-known colonial text from New Spain, originally penned by Francisco de Florencia in the 1690s but later modified, amplified, and published by Juan Antonio de Oviedo in 1755. This essay concentrates on Florencia's contributions to this compendium of Marian images, specifically the symbolism of the four Marian bastions in...
Conference Paper
Jesuits worked closely with soldiers to convert indigenous peoples to the Christian faith in the province of Sinaloa. There was an intimate relationship between their missions and presidios, especially after the martyrdom of Gonzalo de Tapia in 1594 and subsequent indigenous revolts in the early decades of the seventeenth century. But while histori...
Conference Paper
A common image of a missionary from the early modern period is a Jesuit seeking to convert indigenous people to Christianity. While their evangelical labour needs to be acknowledged to understand the expansion of the Counter Reformation Church, more attention needs to be given to indigenous preachers, informants, catechists, and translators. In thi...
Conference Paper
Durante la temprana Edad Moderna los jesuitas circularon cartas e historias sagradas por todas sus provincias religiosas en el mundo. Este “impulso de escribir,” como Inés G. Županov lo describe, ayudó a desarrollar una teología en común y estrategias semejantes en sus misiones a pesar de las grandes distancias entre ellos. En esta ponencia me voy...
Conference Paper
Colonial expansion into Spanish America contributed to the globalization of the Virgin Mary. By the end of the seventeenth century an extensive network of local shrines had been erected in her honour from the initial point of contact in the Caribbean to the furthest stretches of the frontiers. As the centre of political power and religious authorit...
Conference Paper
At the turn of the seventeenth century a new form of hagiography emerged across Spanish America. Sacred historians began to write lives of colonial subjects from various socioracial backgrounds. Despite the negative stereotypes applied to mestizos, mulattos, blacks, and Indians, religious men hailed an exemplary few as models of Christian virtue. T...
Conference Paper
Jesuits in the early modern Spanish world described their work of evangelization as a “spiritual conquest” of native souls. In their provincial chronicles, mission histories, devotional histories, and sacred biographies they exalted the men of their religious order as self-sacrificing men willing to die for the sake of the Christian gospel. But if...
Article
Full-text available
In the past, Spaniards, creoles, Indians, and blacks were all kept in neatly separate explanatory categories to analyze conquest, conversion, and cultural change from initial contact to the wars for independence. Spaniards, so the old colonial story was told, were the brave and self-sacrificing spiritual and military conquerors of Amerindian empire...
Conference Paper
Across the early modern Spanish world sacred historians described the work of evangelization as a “spiritual conquest” of native souls. They masterfully crafted an image of self-sacrificing religious men bent on suffering, hardship, and even martyrdom for the sake of an expanding global church. This vision of the militant church overseas gives the...
Conference Paper
Recent scholarship has rightly exposed the “myths of conquest” by shifting attention away from the Spanish conquistadors to their indigenous allies. In these new histories Indians are presented as conquistadors in their own right and important actors in the fall of Amerindian empires. In this paper I apply this same principle to the so-called “spir...
Conference Paper
En la historia sagrada los cronistas mendicantes escribieron sobre el establecimiento de sus órdenes religiosas en la Nueva España. Para ellos la llegada a la ciudad de México fue fundamental en sus narraciones históricas porque el orden de su entrada en la capital fue un factor importante de su capital espiritual y social. En esta ponencia analizo...
Conference Paper
Through sacred history the religious orders cultivated corporate identities and promoted their Christian ministries in New Spain. Selected members of the regular clergy wrote provincial chronicles of their apostolic labours, many of them providing an account of their origins in the viceroyalty. For most religious chroniclers the arrival to Mexico C...
Conference Paper
My paper analyzes Creole Jesuit hagiography in the vidas of Francisco de Florencia’s Historia de la Provincia. Although he published the first volume of his provincial chronicle in 1694, the second and third volumes were never printed and remained in manuscript form. Volume III has survived in the Jesuit archives of Mexico City and contains biograp...
Conference Paper
Working in Canada has been a reality for thousands of Mexicans since the Canadian Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program expanded beyond the Caribbean in 1974 to include Latin America. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s Vincenzo Pietropaolo followed these migrant workers from their farms in southern Ontario to their local towns back home in central Mexic...
Article
Full-text available
p> Antes de que el jesuita Francisco de Florencia pudiera publicar la Historia de la Provincia (1694) tuvo que quitar varios capítulos del segundo libro del primer volumen. La parte que fue sacada de su borrador da un resumen de los errores de las teorías antiguas del ambiente del Nuevo Mundo, la grandeza de la ciudad de México antes de la conquist...
Article
Chimalpahin’s Conquest is an English translation of a uniquely hybrid colonial text from central Mexico. In the early 1600s the Nahua annalist Domingo Francisco de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin transcribed La conquista de México (1552), a widely popular history of the so-called “conquest” of Mexico-Tenochtitlan written by the sixtee...
Conference Paper
This paper will focus on the way the Floridian Jesuit Francisco de Florencia incorporated the sacred past of the Jesuit missions in Florida into his patriotic vision of New Spain. In 1694 Florencia published the first volume of his chronicle of the Province of the Company of Jesus of New Spain; but unlike other Jesuit chroniclers before him, the Fl...
Conference Paper
In my paper I analyse the way seventeenth-century novenas from New Spain were used as texts of Creole patriotic promotion. Novenas are small pocket-sized books of devotion dedicated to a saint or the Virgin Mary that contain short origin stories, ritual instructions, prayers, and meditations for nine days. These spiritual aids were written to culti...
Conference Paper
In my paper I explore the patriotic tradition of textual iconic mapping in New Spain by focusing on the eighteenth-century compendium of Marian images, the Zodiaco mariano. The initial author of this work was the Floridian Jesuit Francisco de Florencia (1620-1695). During the 1680s and the 1690s he took an emerging textual cartographic tradition of...
Conference Paper
Un capítulo de la historia del indigenismo en México desconocido es el que nos deja el jesuita floridano Francisco de Florencia (1620-1695). Florencia escribió una serie de historias sobre imágenes milagrosas novohispanas en los últimos años de su vida en la ciudad de México. Utilizó fuentes indígenas como códices, mapas, los manuscritos de Carlos...
Conference Paper
This paper will focus on how the Mercedarian Francisco de Pareja (1620-1688) and the Jesuit Francisco de Florencia (1620-1695) rewrote the dominant narrative of the “spiritual conquest” of New Spain established by Franciscans in the sixteenth century. The Franciscans had aligned themselves with Hernán Cortés by presenting him as a providential port...

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