Jason R. Bourque

Jason R. Bourque
University of Florida | UF · Florida Museum of Natural History

MA

About

36
Publications
34,465
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483
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2009 - present
Florida Museum of Natural History
Position
  • Preparator / Vertebrate Paleontologist
March 2009 - present
Florida Museum of Natural History
Position
  • Preparator / Vertebrate Paleontologist

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Forachelys woodi gen. et sp. nov. is described from lower Miocene (Arikareean NALMA) exposures of the upper Las Cascadas Formation (~21 Ma) in the Panama Canal Basin. It represents the latest occurrence of ptychogastrine geoemydids in North America, a group known primarily from the early Eocene to late Miocene of Europe. Forachelys woodi shares fea...
Article
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A series of small-sized fossil turtles were collected from Beckles' Pit, Durlston Bay, Dorset, United Kingdom in 1856 from a sediment package referable to the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian) Purbeck Group. The two primary accounts that previously documented these turtles concluded that they represent the juveniles of the coeval early pleurosternid Pl...
Article
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ABSTRACT Notapachemys oglala, gen. et sp. nov., is described based on carapace and plastron fossils collected from upper Eocene (Chadronian NALMA, White River Group) exposures in northwestern Nebraska, U.S.A. It is recognized as having a thick, smooth, partly fused, acarinate, egg-shaped carapace with strong plastral hindlobe kinesis. Many of these...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Trionychid fossils from the late Miocene (late Clarendonian) Love Bone Bed in Alachua County, Florida, are described as a single taxon that represents a new species, Apalone amorense sp. nov. A phyloge-netic analysis recovers A. amorense as sister to all extant representatives of Apalone. The new species is relatively small at adult size c...
Article
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The oldest fossils of the genus Clemmys (spotted turtles) are described from the early Pleistocene (latest Blancan NALMA, ~1.9–1.6 Ma) Inglis 1C locality in Citrus County, Florida. Clemmys hutchensorum n. sp. is morphologically most similar to the extant spotted turtle, Clemmys guttata, and is likely the sister taxon of C. guttata. The epi-and xiph...
Article
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Fossils from paleocoastal deposits in northwestern Florida represent at least 3 pleurodire taxa. Biochronologic and paleoclimatic correlates suggest that the presence and absence of side-necked turtles in Florida was synchronous with global climatic shifts in the middle to late Paleogene and early Neogene. The oldest pleurodire record in Florida is...
Article
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Turtles of the total clade Pan-Kinosternoidea have a relatively poor fossil record that extends back to the Late Cretaceous (Campanian). The clade is found only in North America during its early history, but dispersed to Central America no later than the Miocene and to South America no later than the Pleistocene. Ancestral pan-kinosternoids were li...
Article
Kinosternon Spix, 1824, was widespread in xeric to savanna associated paleowetlands across North America during the middle–late Miocene and steadily diversified following its first occurrences in the Hemingfordian. In the middle Miocene, Kinosternon rincon n. sp. occurred in the late Barstovian Cerro Conejo Formation of north central New Mexico, pe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The cephalic shield of cingulates is a structure comprised of sutured osteoderms that is highly variable in overall shape and number of osteoderms across different taxa. The cephalic shields of the extinct giant armadillos (pampatheres) are poorly known. The late Blancan Haile 7G locality in north-central Florida has produced the largest known asse...
Article
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Abstract. – We provide a first checklist and review of all recognized taxa of the world's extinct Pleistocene and Holocene (Quaternary) turtles and tortoises that existed during the early rise and global expansion of humanity, and most likely went extinct through a combination of earlier hominin (e.g., Homo erectus, H. neanderthalensis) and later h...
Article
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Gomphochelys nanus, new genus and species, is described from the earliest Wasatchian (biohorizon Wa 0; ∼55.8 Ma) of the southeastern Bighorn Basin, Washakie County, Wyoming. The new taxon represents the only known dermatemydid from the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) interval and extends the lineage back from previous records by approximate...
Article
Full-text available
The oldest fossil musk turtles, genus Sternotherus, are reported from the Hemphillian of eastern Tennessee and central Florida. Sternotherus palaeodorus, n. sp., is known from five partial shells discovered at the late Miocene–early Pliocene (7–4.5 Ma; late Hemphillian) Gray Fossil Site in Washington County, Tennessee. Sternotherus palaeodorus poss...
Article
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The Alligator Snapping Turtle, Macrochelys temminckii, is a large, aquatic turtle limited to river systems that drain into the Gulf of Mexico. Previous molecular analyses using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA suggested that Macrochelys exhibits significant genetic variation across its range that includes three distinct genetic assemblages (weste...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Titanoboa cerrejonensis from the Cerrejón Formation (middle to late Paleocene; 58-60 My) of Colombia, is the largest known snake. The taxon was originally diagnosed, assigned to the clade Boinae, and estimated to be approximately 12.8 m (±2.18 m) in total body length on the basis of precloacal vertebral morphology and size, but the absence of crani...
Article
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The purpose of this application, under Article 75.5 of the Code, is to conserve the current usage of the name Terrapene putnami Hay, 1906. We propose replacement of the nondiagnostic holotype (a fragment of a left hypoplastron) that was collected from a temporally mixed locality, with a more complete specimen comprised of the carapace, plastron, an...
Chapter
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Kinosternid remains are generally rare through the Oligocene and Miocene. Fossil material from eight Florida localities is presented here. Specimens discussed include the latest and most southeastern occurrence of the genus Xenochelys (new species), one of the earliest occurrences of Kinosternon, the oldest record of the Kinosternon subrubrum-bauri...
Article
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The nearly complete skeleton of a mud turtle, Kinosternon skullridgescens, n. sp., is described from Santa Fe County, New Mexico. The specimen was collected from the early middle Miocene, early Barstovian, Skull Ridge Member of the Tesuque Formation (16.0–14.9 Ma) and is one of the oldest and most complete fossil representatives of the genus Kinost...
Article
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Four distinct fossil turtle assemblages (Chelonia) are recognized from the Panama Canal Basin. The oldest, from the late Eocene–early Oligocene Gatuncillo Formation, is dominated by podocnemidid pleurodires. The early Miocene Culebra Formation includes both podocnemidids and trionychids. The early to middle Miocene Cucaracha Formation includes taxa...
Article
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The complete skeleton of a fossil mud turtle, Kinosternon pojoaque, n. sp., is described from the late Barstovian Rodent Pocket, San Ildefonso Locality of Santa Fe County, New Mexico. The new species represents the oldest member of the Kinosternon flavescens group and suggests that this clade first evolved in the southwestern United States, which,...
Article
Full-text available
In the online-only Methods of our Letter, equation (3) was published incorrectly. It should read: (Formula presented) Also, some data in Supplementary Table 2 was incorrectly ordered (J. A. Rivas and P. T. Andreadis brought this to our attention). Supplementary Table 2 and equation (3) have been corrected online.
Article
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The oldest paleontological record of the Stinkpot Musk Turtle, Sternotherus odoratus, from the WaKeeney local fauna (approximately 10 million years ago, Mya) is refuted here. Kinosternids from this fauna are represented only by the genus Kinosternon. Kinosternon sp. probably represents a new taxon, but lack of sufficient material hinders a proper d...
Article
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Graptemys kerneri, n. sp., from the Suwannee River drainage of north-central Florida, represents the most southeastern occurrence of the genus. This species is morphologically and geographically most similar to the extant Barbour's map turtle, Graptemys barbouri. G. kerneri exhibits sexual dimorphism similar to extant G. barbouri, G. ernsti, G. pul...
Article
Full-text available
Replying to: J. M. K. Sniderman Nature 460, 10.1038/nature08222 (2009); A. M. Makarieva, V. G. Gorshkov & B.-L. Li Nature 460, 10.1038/nature08223 (2009); M. W. Denny, B. L. Lockwood & G. N. Somero Nature 460, 10.1038/nature08224 (2009)
Article
Full-text available
The largest extant snakes live in the tropics of South America and southeast Asia where high temperatures facilitate the evolution of large body sizes among air-breathing animals whose body temperatures are dependant on ambient environmental temperatures (poikilothermy). Very little is known about ancient tropical terrestrial ecosystems, limiting o...

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Project (1)
Project
In November 2015, fossil bones were discovered weathering out of exposures created by a sand mining operation about 30 km southwest of Gainesville, Florida. Paleontologists of the Florida Museum of Natural History quickly determined that the site was potentially very significant, and began quarrying operations. However there is a finite time to excavate fossils. Thus there is a great urgency to recover as many fossils as possible through careful excavation. The 5-million-year old site has so far produced fossils of about 50 vertebrate taxa. A very broad range of body size is represented, with bones of animals the size of small mice and salamanders found in the same strata as those of rhinos and elephants. Portions of the site are richly fossiliferous and some areas routinely produce articulated skeletons. This is the first vertebrate locality of this age in the southeastern coastal plain with complete skeletons, and also the only one with a diverse fauna of small vertebrates. Undergraduate students, high school teachers, and citizen scientists will be trained and involved in this excavation. Specimens will be deposited at the Florida Museum of Natural History.