Jasmine K. Gani

Jasmine K. Gani
University of St Andrews · International Relations

About

24
Publications
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48
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Introduction
Research interests : Race; Knowledge production; US & European empires in the Middle East and Asia; anti-colonial history & political thought; relationship between ideologies & social movements; Islam. Open Access versions of all publications also at: jasminekgani.wordpress.com

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
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In this article, I ask three key questions: First, what is the relationship between militarism and race? Second, how does colonialism shape that relationship to produce racial militarism on both sides of the imperial encounter? And, third, what is the function of racial militarism? I build on Fanon’s psychoanalytic work on the production of racial...
Chapter
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This chapter argues for a reassessment of the dominant position on Arab nationalism within the Anglophone academic literature, which posits that Arab nationalism carries little relevance in contemporary regional politics after capitulating in the 1967 war. I contest this narrative with the following arguments: first, English-language discourse on M...
Article
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This essay has two goals: first, it seeks to outline the dissonance between nationalist self-determination and a decolonial pursuit of independence using Fanon’s blueprint for decolonisation. Second, it interrogates the decolonial potential in Fanon’s blueprint, and asks whether anticolonial groups can ever truly escape the inheritance of a Eurocen...
Article
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This article explores three key arguments: Firstly, it seeks to demonstrate the contradictions and limits within Kantian hospitality, and its links to colonialism and practices of racialisation. The acclaimed universalism of Kant’s law of hospitality forecloses a discussion of its dualism, and erases the historical, racist context in which it was c...
Book
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This book studies Syrian-American relations from Syrian independence in 1946 to the death of Hafez Asad in 2000. It draws upon archival sources to understand the driving factors of mistrust between Damascus and Washington. Author J.K. Gani charts the antagonistic relationship of the two states through the lenses of the Cold War, the Arab-Israeli co...
Article
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Is there an academic–policy divide, and does that gap need to be bridged? For decades, International Relations (IR) scholars have reflected on their roles and responsibilities towards the ‘real world’, while policy-makers have often critiqued the detachment of academic research. In response, there have been increased calls for academics to descend...
Article
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Ten years on since the Arab uprisings we are in a position to assess how the nexus between knowledge, discourse and practice had a bearing on the trajectory of the protests. They represented hope and change for millions of Arabs in the region, but to what extent was that the case for onlookers in Europe and the US, and did western discourse on even...
Chapter
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This chapter maps out the developments within the broadly defined Syrian opposition in the early to middle phase of the conflict. This is a period now often overlooked in analyses of the conflict since so much of the opposition movement’s goals and efforts seem to have been waylaid and effectively crushed by the dominance of the Assad regime in the...
Book
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Conflict and instability are built into the very fabric of the Middle East and North African (MENA) state and states system; yet both states and states system have displayed remarkable resilience. How can we explain this? This handbook explores the main debates, theoretical approaches and accumulated empirical research by prominent scholars in the...
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The US publicly tied its Syria policy to the Syrian rebels from an early stage of the uprisings. In doing so the US sought to be viewed as champions of democracy and popular movements in the Middle East, in alignment with the US’s longstanding role conception, its hegemonic willingness to lead and more specifically with Obama’s public rhetoric. Thi...
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This article discusses the role of ideology in International Relations. It seeks to rectify potential weaknesses in any ideological analysis using two approaches. Firstly, applying a more thorough and precise definition of ideology. Secondly, identifying the historicity and complexities within an ideology, distinguishing between core and peripheral...
Chapter
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The contentious politics framework poses two central questions: Why does the emergence of contentious politics sometimes fail to make the transition into a social movement? Why and how does it get repressed, and how does that transform the nature of contentious politics? This chapter applies these core questions to the case of the Syrian uprisings...
Chapter
None of the underlying motives discussed in the previous chapter were at the time known to the Syrians, and the United States did succeed in bringing them to the negotiating table. Communication at a high-ranking level was finally established by Kissinger during his visit to Damascus in December 1973. During this period of shuttle diplomacy, he spe...
Chapter
The previous sections looked at Syria’s interaction with the United States at the leadership level. Prior to independence, the presence of French forces prevented any meaningful Syrian leadership in foreign affairs, while post independence the fledgling state was dominated by a series of coups and counter-coups, bringing in autocratic military lead...
Chapter
The European mandates after the First World War laid the foundations for Syrian politics in the interwar period, thereby producing a legacy of priorities, fears, and aspirations that was built upon by later Arab political actors. It is often easy to neglect the US contribution to these foundations as it played a relatively limited role, but this in...
Chapter
The previous chapter brought us to the eve of the 1973 war between Egypt, Syria, and Israel. The war was a result of the deadlock that followed the earlier war of 1967 and the devastating defeat for the Arabs. With Israel occupying and settling on captured Arab lands, and content with the status quo, the Arabs had little to no bargaining power in a...
Chapter
On August 2, 1990, Iraq invaded and occupied neighboring Kuwait. The UN Security Council passed Resolution 660, which condemned the invasion and demanded complete and unconditional withdrawal, secured by the use of force if necessary. This was followed soon by the cutting off of arms supplies and the deployment of US troops in Saudi Arabia.
Chapter
Washington’s postwar policy and increasing inclination toward Israel provoked an increasingly hostile policy from Syria. Between 1967 and 1970, the Syrians saw no signs of progress for the recovery of the occupied Golan Heights or Palestinian territories or parity in the balance of power in the region. As a result, the Syrians harbored the followin...
Chapter
In the years following Syrian independence, Israel emerged as the main aggravating factor in Syria’s relations with the West, particularly with the United States. It is impossible to overstate the role that Israel played in any development of US-Syrian relations. Syria’s popular and political adherence to an anti-imperialist agenda, the Arab nation...
Article
Full-text available
This thesis is a study of US-Syrian relations, and the legacy of mistrust between the two states. While there has been a recent growth in the study of Syria’s domestic and regional politics, its foreign policy in a global systemic context remains understudied within mainstream International Relations (IR), Foreign Policy Analysis (FPA), and even...

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Project (1)
Project
This project explores the coloniality of nationalist and militarist ideologies in postcolonial states & social movements in the Middle East