Jasmine Castro

Jasmine Castro
RMIT University | RMIT · Department of Chemical Engineering

Doctor of Engineering

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6
Publications
1,129
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86
Citations

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
We reveal a unique mechanism by which pure water can be dissociated to form free radicals without requiring catalysts, electrolytes or electrode contact by means of high frequency nanometer-amplitude electromechanical surface vibrations in the form of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated on a piezoelectric substrate. The physical undulations ass...
Article
Full-text available
Tactile haptic feedback is an important consideration in the design of advanced human--machine interfaces, particularly in an age of increasing reliance on automation and artificial intelligence. In this work, we show that the typical nanometer-order surface displacement amplitudes of piezoelectric transducers---which are too small to be detectable...
Article
We have sought to address an existing technology gap in laboratory liquid handling capability—in particular the dispensing of sub-microliter volumes and fairly viscous liquids—through a robust, low-cost and user-friendly acoustomicrofluidic platform that facilitates rapid, reproducible and precise nanoliter sample dispensing. The solid-state chipsc...
Article
Full-text available
Correction for ‘Continuous tuneable droplet ejection via pulsed surface acoustic wave jetting’ by Jasmine O. Castro et al. , Soft Matter , 2018, DOI: 10.1039/c7sm02534c.
Article
We report a miniaturised platform for continuous production of single or multiple liquid droplets with diameters between 60 and 500 μm by interfacing a capillary-driven self-replenishing liquid feed with pulsed excitation of focussed surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The orifice-free operation circumvents the disadvantages of conventional jetting syst...
Article
Full-text available
We report a simple method for on-demand continuous processing of composite liquid marbles with the aid of a 3D printed slide platform, which offers the potential for engineering novel functional surfaces for the production of combination drug therapies, particle-based barcode biomarkers and smart membranes, among other applications. Unlike other at...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Dear all,
I'm taking time measurements of a chemical reaction and performing a chromatographic analysis (HPLC) to monitor the decay of the main reagent and growth of the product. However, something struck me as odd: the peak of the products are much higher (thousands of times) than the reagent's peak.
Assuming that it is a decomposition reaction and that there's no gas being formed, would it be possible that similar amounts (in g) of different samples would give such different absorbances for the same wavelength?

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