Jasmin A Godbold

Jasmin A Godbold
University of Southampton · National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS)

Marine Biology and Zoology

About

74
Publications
21,995
Reads
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1,680
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2012 - September 2014
University of Southampton
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2008 - January 2012
University of Aberdeen
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Full-text available
Cumulative and synergistic impacts from environmental pressures, particularly in low-lying tropical coastal regions, present challenges for the governance of ecosystems which provide natural resource-based livelihoods for communities. Here, we seek to understand the relationship between responses to the impacts of El Niño and La Niña events and the...
Article
Full-text available
Unprecedented and dramatic transformations are occurring in the Arctic in response to climate change, but academic, public, and political discourse has disproportionately focussed on the most visible and direct aspects of change, including sea ice melt, permafrost thaw, the fate of charismatic megafauna, and the expansion of fisheries. Such narrati...
Article
A field-based experiment was conducted on a detritus-loaded beach on the south coast of the British Isles (Poole Harbour) to investigate the decay rates of different combinations of algal detritus and their associated nematode assemblages. Ten algal mixture treatment combinations (monocultures with all possible 2 or 3 mixed algal treatments) of thr...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Climate‐induced changes in the ocean and sea ice environment of the Arctic are beginning to generate major and rapid changes in Arctic ecosystems, but the effects of directional forcing on the persistence and distribution of species remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the reproductive traits and population dynamics of the bivalve As...
Article
A research agenda is currently developing around predicting the functional response of ecosystems to local alterations of biodiversity associated with anthropogenic activity, but existing conceptual and empirical frameworks do not serve this area well as most lack ecological realism. Here, in order to advance credible projections of future ecosyste...
Article
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Arctic marine ecosystems are undergoing a series of major rapid adjustments to the regional amplification of climate change, but there is a paucity of knowledge about how changing environmental conditions might affect reproductive cycles of seafloor organisms. Shifts in species reproductive ecology may influence their entire life-cycle, and, ultima...
Article
Aim: Growth rates of organisms are routinely used to summarize physiological performance , but the consequences of local evolutionary history and ecology are largely missed by analyses on wide biogeographical scales. This broad approach has been commonly applied to other physiological parameters across terrestrial and aquatic environments. Here, we...
Article
Arctic marine ecosystems are undergoing rapid correction in response to multiple expressions of climate change, but the consequences of altered biodiversity for the sequestration, transformation and storage of nutrients are poorly constrained. Here, we determine the bioturbation activity of sediment-dwelling invertebrate communities over two consec...
Article
Innovative solutions to improve the condition and resilience of ecosystems are needed to address societal challenges and pave the way towards a climate-resilient future. Nature-based solutions offer the potential to protect, sustainably manage and restore natural or modified ecosystems while providing multiple other benefits for health, the economy...
Article
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Functional trait-based approaches are increasingly adopted to understand and project ecological responses to environmental change, however most assume trait expression is constant between conspecifics irrespective of context. Using two species of benthic invertebrate (brittlestars Amphiura filiformis and A. chiajei) we demonstrate that trait expres...
Article
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In order to help safeguard biodiversity from global changes, the Convention on Biological Diversity developed a Strategic Plan for Biodiversity for the period 2011-2020 that included a list of twenty specific objectives known as the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. With the end of that timeframe in sight, and despite major advancements in biodiversity c...
Article
p>Mangrove distribution patterns at regional scales are influenced by additional factors besides temperature and rainfall regimes. This study identified abiotic drivers of mangrove area cover along the high-energy, wave-dominated coastline of South Africa. This is one of the southernmost locations globally for mangroves. A structural equation model...
Article
Cosmopolitan habitat-forming taxa of algae such as the genus Corallina provide an opportunity to compare patterns of biodiversity over wide geographic scales. Nematode assemblages inhabiting Corallina turves were compared between the south coasts of the British Isles and South Korea. A fully nested design was used with three regions in each country...
Chapter
Poorly constrained uncertainties limit the prediction of medium to long-term regional sediment budgets and morphological change, and thus hinder coastal management decision-making. We present a multi-disciplinary approach that aims to address this challenge and is implemented in the BLUEcoast project. The approach brings together scientists and coa...
Article
Full-text available
The activities of a diverse array of sediment-dwelling fauna are known to mediate carbon remineralisation, biogeochemical cycling and other important properties of marine ecosystems, but the contributions that different seabed communities make to the global inventory have not been established. Here we provide a comprehensive georeferenced database...
Article
Full-text available
p>There is now strong evidence that ecosystem properties are influenced by alterations in biodiversity. The consensus that has emerged from over two decades of research is that the form of the biodiversity-functioning relationship follows a saturating curve. However, the foundation from which these conclusions are drawn mostly stems from empirical...
Article
Canopy-forming algae are important habitat providers in coastal ecosystems. Several canopy-forming species have spread outside their native geographic range. We investigated the role that these invasive non-native algae play in providing habitat for meiofaunal species. Sargassum muticum is a native species in East Asia and has been a successful inv...
Article
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In a context of both long-term climatic changes and short-term climatic shocks, temporal dynamics profoundly influence ecosystems and societies. In low income contexts in the Tropics, where both exposure and vulnerability to climatic fluctuations is high, the frequency, duration, and trends in these fluctuations are important determinants of socio-...
Article
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The effectiveness of stringent climate stabilization scenarios for coastal areas in terms of reduction of impacts/adaptation needs and wider policy implications has received little attention. Here we use the Warming Acidification and Sea Level Projector Earth systems model to calculate large ensembles of global sea-level rise (SLR) and ocean pH pro...
Article
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Global increases in sea temperatures and atmospheric concentrations of CO2 may affect the health of calcifying shellfish. Little is known, however, about how competitive interactions within and between species may influence how species respond to multiple stressors. We experimentally assessed separate and combined effects of temperature (12 or 16°C...
Article
Full-text available
Continental shelf sediments are globally important for biogeochemical activity. Quantification of shelf-scale stocks and fluxes of carbon and nutrients requires the extrapolation of observations made at limited points in space and time. The procedure for selecting exemplar sites to form the basis of this up-scaling is discussed in relation to a UK-...
Article
Full-text available
Fundamental changes in seawater carbonate chemistry and sea surface temperatures associated with the ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 are accelerating, but investigations of the susceptibility of biogeochemical processes to the simultaneous occurrence of multiple components of climate change are uncommon. Here, we quantify how concurrent changes i...
Article
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Benthic communities play a major role in organic matter remineralisation and the mediation of many aspects of shelf sea biogeochemistry. Few studies have considered how changes in community structure associated with different levels of physical disturbance affect sediment macronutrients and carbon following the cessation of disturbance. Here, we in...
Article
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Microbes and benthic macro-invertebrates interact in sediments to play a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of organic matter, but the extent to which their contributions are modified following natural and anthropogenic changes has received little attention. Here, we investigate how nitrogen transformations, ascertained from changes in archae...
Article
The coasts and shelf seas that surround us have been the focal point of human prosperity and well-being throughout our history and, consequently, have had a disproportionate effect on our culture. The societal importance of the shelf seas extends beyond food production to include biodiversity, carbon cycling and storage, waste disposal, nutrient cy...
Article
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Seagrasses are often regarded as climate change ‘winners’ because they exhibit higher rates of photosynthesis, carbon fixation and growth when exposed to increasing levels of ocean acidification. However, questions remain whether such growth enhancement compromises the biomechanical properties of the plants, altering their vulnerability to structur...
Article
Full-text available
There is unequivocal evidence that altered biodiversity, through changes in the expression and distribution of functional traits, can have large impacts on ecosystem properties. However, trait-based summaries of how organisms affect ecosystem properties often assume that traits show constancy within and between populations and that species contribu...
Article
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Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom consi...
Article
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The ecological consequences of species loss are widely studied, but represent an end point of environmental forcing that is not always realised. Changes in species evenness and the rank order of dominant species are more widespread responses to directional forcing. However, despite the repercussions for ecosystem functioning such changes have recei...
Article
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Coastal and shelf environments support high levels of biodiversity that are vital in mediating ecosystem processes, but they are also subject to noise associated with mounting levels of offshore human activity. This has the potential to alter the way in which species interact with their environment, compromising the mediation of important ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
Context: Anthropogenic activity has increased the level of atmospheric CO2, which is driving an increase of global temperatures and associated changes in precipitation patterns. At Northern latitudes, one of the likely consequences of global warming is increased precipitation and air humidity. Aims: In this work, the effects of both elevated atmos...
Presentation
Previous studies into the effects of biodiversity on ecosystem function have been derived from small scale, manipulative laboratory or in situ experiments. These studies have used assemblages of 2 or 3 key species, which they have assumed are representative of the whole system. This suggests a system is homogenous and can be replicated by a subset...
Article
Full-text available
Culturing experiments were performed on sediment samples from the Ythan Estuary, N. E. Scotland, to assess the impacts of ocean acidification on test surface ornamentation in the benthic foraminifer Haynesina germanica. Specimens were cultured for 36 weeks at either 380, 750 or 1000 ppm atmospheric CO2. Analysis of the test surface using SEM imagin...
Article
Full-text available
Warming of sea surface temperatures and alteration of ocean chemistry associated with anthropogenic increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide will have profound consequences for a broad range of species, but the potential for seasonal variation to modify species and ecosystem responses to these stressors has received little attention. Here, using the...
Article
Full-text available
Bioturbation, the biogenic modification of sediments through particle reworking and burrow ventilation, is a key mediator of many important geochemical processes in marine systems. In situ quantification of bioturbation can be achieved in a myriad of ways, requiring expert knowledge, technology, and resources not always available, and not feasible...
Data
Full-text available
Bioturbation, the biogenic modification of sediments through particle rework-ing and burrow ventilation, is a key mediator of many important geochemical processes in marine systems. In situ quantification of bioturbation can be achieved in a myriad of ways, requiring expert knowledge, technology, and resources not always available, and not feasible...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] has increased from a pre-industrial level of approximately 280 ppm to approximately 385 ppm, with further increases (700–1000 ppm) anticipated by the end of the twenty-first century [1]. Over the past three decades, changes in [CO2] have increased global average temperatures (approx. 0.2°C decade?1 [2]), with muc...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents results on the influence of geometric attributes of satellite-derived raster bathymetric data, namely the General Bathymetric Charts of the Oceans, on spatial statistical modelling of marine biomass. In the initial experiment, both the resolution and projection of the raster dataset are taken into account. It was found that, inde...
Article
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A time series from 1977–1989 and 2000–2002 of scientific trawl surveys in the Porcupine Seabight and adjacent abyssal plain of the NE Atlantic was analysed to assess changes in demersal fish biomass and length frequency. These two periods coincide with the onset of the commercial deep-water fishery in the late 1970s and the onset of the regulation...
Article
Full-text available
A time series from 1977-1989 and 2000-2002 of scientific trawl surveys in the Porcupine Seabight and adjacent Abyssal Plain of the NE Atlantic was analysed to assess changes in demersal fish biomass and length frequency. These two periods coincide with the on-set of the commercial deep-water fishery in the late 1970s and the on-set of the regulatio...
Chapter
Full-text available
Many species are going extinct, mainly due to anthropogenic activities and climate forcing. The ecological significance of extinction has been linked to the sequential order of species loss and whether the extinction risk of each species is associated with the life-history traits that play an important role in ecosystem functioning. Trait-based ext...
Article
Full-text available
The Ecosystem Approach is increasingly being adopted as a framework for developing environmental policy because it forms a strategy for the management and sustainable use of land, water and living resources. Yet it is not clear how this approach translates into policies that will create the integrated management necessary to protect the environment...
Article
Full-text available
Much of what we know about the role of biodiversity in mediating ecosystem processes and function stems from manipulative experiments, which have largely been performed in isolated, homogeneous environments that do not incorporate habitat structure or allow natural community dynamics to develop. Here, we use a range of habitat configurations in a m...
Article
Full-text available
Current and projected rates of extinction provide impetus to investigate the consequences of biodiversity loss for ecosystem processes. Yet our understanding of present day biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relations contrasts markedly with our understanding of the responses of species to changes that have occurred in the geological record. Of the...
Article
The ichthyofauna of ocean margin regions is characterised by a succession of different species occurring at different depths. This study was aimed at determining whether the resultant pattern of species richness with depth is a consequence of local factors in a given region or whether it simply reflects the global pattern of fish species distributi...
Article
The Ecosystem Approach (EA) to environmental management aims to enhance human well-being within a linked social and ecological system, through protecting the delivery of benefits and services to society from ecosystems in the face of external pressures such as climate change. However, our lack of understanding of the linkages between the human and...
Chapter
The Ecosystem Approach (EA) to environmental management aims to enhance human well-being within a linked social and ecological system, through protecting the delivery of benefits and services to society from ecosystems in the face of external pressures such as climate change. However, our lack of understanding of the linkages between the human and...
Article
Full-text available
Whilst there is a wealth of empirical studies that indicate negative ecosystem consequences of biodiversity loss, much debate remains over the existence, strength and importance of the same patterns in natural systems. We used a gradient of organic enrichment as a means of defining non-random species loss in the marine benthos and, using partial li...
Data
Aquaria (randomly arranged) containing communities of Parastichopus tremulus, Mesothuria intestinalis and Brissopsis lyrifera in monoculture and in mixtures of three species in the temperature controlled room. (0.69 MB TIF)