Jared T. Beaver

Jared T. Beaver
Montana State University | MSU · Department of Animal and Range Sciences

Ph.D.

About

13
Publications
3,301
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
103
Citations
Introduction
I strive to blend wildlife research with applied management by identifying conservation opportunities which have direct relevance for landowners and natural resource managers. Much of my work has focused large mammal/game species ecology and management. Currently, I am interested in using novel technologies to mitigate wildlife conflict issues (depredation, disease transmission, invasive species, resource competition, etc.). WHEL Lab: https://www.wildlifehabitatecologylab.com/extension.html.
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - present
Montana State University
Position
  • Professor
August 2018 - April 2020
Wake Forest University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • (1) Wildlife Habitat Management (4hr credit; undergrad and graduate level) (2) Seminar - Advanced topics in wildlife research (2hr; graduate level) (3) Hunting for Conservation (3hr; undergrad and graduate level)
January 2018 - March 2020
Wake Forest University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2012 - December 2017
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Wildlife Management
January 2009 - May 2011
University of Tennessee
Field of study
  • Wildlife Management
August 2004 - May 2008
Wake Forest University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Population monitoring requires techniques that produce estimates with low bias and adequate precision. Distance sampling using ground-based thermal infrared imaging (ground imaging) and spotlight surveys is commonly used to estimate population densities of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). These surveys are often conducted along roads, wh...
Article
Full-text available
Attitudes and motivations of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) hunters are important for state wildlife agencies to consider when they are trying to meet harvest goals for the species. In recent years, interest in quality deer management (QDM) has grown, but little is known about hunter support for QDM. We surveyed hunters on private hunti...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional methods for estimating white-tailed deer population size and density are affected by behavioral biases, poor detection in densely forested areas, and invalid techniques for estimating effective trapping area. We evaluated a noninvasive method of capture—recapture for white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus density estimation using DNA...
Article
Full-text available
Drones equipped with thermal sensors have shown ability to overcome some of the limitations often associated with traditional human‐occupied aerial surveys (e.g., low detection, high operational cost, human safety risk). However, their accuracy and reliability as a valid population technique have not been adequately tested. We tested the effectiven...
Article
Full-text available
Across much of the Western United States, recovery of large carnivore populations is creating new challenges for livestock producers. Reducing the risks of sharing the landscape with recovering wildlife populations is critical to private working lands, which play an vital role in securing future energy, water, food, and fiber for an ever-expanding...
Article
Full-text available
Capture and handling of animals is an essential component of wildlife research. Human population growth, coupled with rapid land use changes, have resulted in increased wildlife‐human interactions and subsequently increased public awareness and sensitivity to animal welfare. However, few publications have compared capture techniques in terms of eff...
Article
Full-text available
Spring through fall is a magical time in Montana for the outdoor enthusiast. However, it is also a great time for snakes done hunkering down for the winter, making human encounters more likely. For many, snakes evoke feelings of uneasiness to outright panic. Montana only has 10 native snake species, of which, only the Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus...
Article
Full-text available
Grizzly bear populations across Montana are rapidly growing and expanding into historic ranges. This expansion increases the likelihood of human-bear conflict, especially during hunting season, because while there are many well-documented safety practices for recreating in grizzly country, being visible and making as much noise as possible isn't th...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report provides U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with the final overall report for the contract Screwworm Assessment and Monitoring for Florida Key Deer – Phase II. This report synthesizes all data through 31 August. Successful resolution of the screwworm incident reduced the need for Key deer data collection (i.e., less radiotelemetry and fewer...
Article
Full-text available
Population monitoring of wildlife species requires techniques that produce estimates with low bias and adequate precision. Use of infrared-triggered camera (hereafter; camera) surveys for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; deer) population density estimation is popular among land managers. However, current camera surveys do not provide an e...
Article
Full-text available
Population monitoring of wildlife species requires techniques that produce estimates with low bias and adequate precision. Use of infrared-triggered camera (hereafter; camera) surveys for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; deer) population density estimation is popular among land managers. However, current camera surveys do not provide an e...
Thesis
Full-text available
Given the white-tailed deer’s (Odocoileus virginianus; deer) popularity and potentially negative impact on forested systems; Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) in Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA has made minimizing negative deer impacts on biodiversity a priority. To address these management issues, I initiated a study on AAFB to investigate deer survey techni...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Private working lands comprise nearly 65% of Montana’s 93 million acres, and play a critical role in securing future energy, water, food, fiber for an ever-expanding human population while providing a suite of invaluable ecosystem services (wildlife habitat, water quality, soil health, etc.). They are essential to what makes Montana special, including clean air and water, scenic open spaces, and abundant wildlife. Thus, maintaining and conserving rural working lands is an absolute necessity if society cares about ecosystem values and quality recreational experiences, but so too is proper land management and stewardship. Wildlife and recreation should not be a by-product of land management practices, nor should it be a liability concern either. Rather they should be assets and planned products. The MSU Wildlife Management Program responds to immediate needs within local areas and proactively anticipates future challenges and opportunities at local, state, regional, and national levels. Educational programs are based on the latest research information. The program vigorously strives to maintain the highest standards of objectivity and professional credibility. Five major audiences are targeted: 1) county/reservation Extension faculty, 2) range livestock producers, 3) government agency personnel, 4) smaller acreage landowners, and 5) youth and the urban public. Current program focal areas include but not limited to: Wildlife-livestock conflict mitigation, wildlife management, wildlife-livestock relationships, public benefit of private lands, land enhancement for wildlife and livestock.
Archived project
Project
To establish a wildlife research program within Wake Forest University's Biology Department and Center of Energy, Environment and Sustainability that is centered on exploring various ecology and conservation-based questions. Most of the research has looked at exploring various new and emerging outlets for population estimation and habitat restoration.