Janus Spindler Møller

Janus Spindler Møller
University of Copenhagen

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25
Publications
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Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
This introductory article opens the thematic issue Spaces of Upset in the Nordic Region. It introduces the contributions of the issue, outlines the concepts that unite them, and discusses the sociolinguistic area in which they are set: the Nordic region. Centering on Denmark, Finland and Sweden, the article offers an overview of some of the socioli...
Article
Five interlocking case studies of variation in and between situations are reported. In all cases a sociolinguistic interview is contrasted with another speech event. The material is from the LANCHART panel study of variation in the Danish speech community in real time. Contrasting speech events are characterized using a genre classification and foc...
Article
In this paper I describe how a group of speakers participating in a longitudinal study develop patterns of linguistic practices as well as norms for their use over time. The group at issue consists of speakers with a Turkish minority background living in Denmark. Data were collected from this group during their nine years of compulsory school and a...
Working Paper
Full-text available
Article
It is well documented that the same sociolinguistic feature can be used as a sociolinguistic resource with different indexical potentials in different linguistic as well as social contexts. Often, however, indexical meanings of a specific feature are related to or derived from one another. In this article we present the results of a perceptual stud...
Article
In this paper we analyze how adolescents in a Copenhagen school classify and systematically organize the different types of language they come across in their linguistic everyday. Furthermore, we analyse descriptions of how this metapragmatic system affect the adolescents' language use in their daily life. Our primary data consist of 74 essays on l...
Article
In this paper we report on a longitudinal study of the linguistic development among Turkish-speaking children in Denmark. A series of data were collected from a group of children attending a public school in KOge during the period 1989-1998 and from the same group - now in their 20s - in 2006-2007. The data set has been analyzed from a number of li...
Article
This paper deals with the ways in which minority students in the Danish public school system bring mono-lingually based norms into their poly-lingual peer group interaction. In sequential micro-analyses of interaction we show how the students use the voice of an authority in their reproduction and negotiation of linguistic norms. We base our analys...
Article
Full-text available
Research highlights ► This editorial examines the negotiation of knowledge and agency in multilingual learning contexts. ► Learners transform semiotic resources, practices, preferences and narratives in talk and action. ► They negotiate agency, power relations and identities in formal and informal learning contexts.
Article
Humankind is a languaging species. This means that as human beings we use language to achieve our goals. Every time we use language, we change the world a little bit. We do so by using language with other human beings, language is in other words social. In this paper we challenge one of the most widely held views of language as a social, human phen...
Article
In this paper, self-recorded interactions from two studies of verbal interaction in Denmark are analysed using key concepts from Erving Goffman's frame analysis and Don Zimmerman's theory of identities in talk. It is documented how the recorder is integrated into everyday interaction as soon as the informant in his or her capacity as temporary fiel...
Article
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Article
This paper deals with linguistic diversity as it occurs in a conversation over dinner between three young Turkish–Danish men living in Denmark. I argue that terms like bilingual or multilingual are inappropriate in order to describe this verbal interaction because these terms presuppose that linguistic production is divided in categories in advance...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Funded by The Joint Committee for Nordic Research Councils in the Humanities and Social Sciences (NOS-HS), this project explores the sociolinguistics of multilingualism in Denmark, Finland and Sweden. The original application was titled ”Contact zones in the Nordic countries: multilingualism, mobility, and diversifying diversity”, and included scholars from the University of Jyväskylä, the University of Copenhagen and Stockholm University. Responding to the goals of the project, workshops were organized (2017–2020) in Copenhagen, Stockholm and Jyväskylä, engaging the following invited discussants and plenary speakers: Professor Karel Arnaut, Professor Monica Heller and Professor Brigitta Busch. Insights gained through that work materialized eventually in a special issue — ”Spaces of upset in the Nordic region: Sociolinguistics beyond cohesion and consensus in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden” — to appear in the May issue of the International Journal of the Sociology of Language (no 275, edited by Salö, Karlander, Leppänen & Westinen). The following scholars were included in the original application. From the University of Jyväskylä team: Sirpa Leppänen (grant holder) Samu Kytölä, Elina Westinen, Saija Peuronen, Piia Jäntti, and Sonya Sahradyan. From the University of Copenhagen team: Janus Spindler Møller, Martha Karrebæk, Lian Malai Madsen Andreas Stæhr, Thomas Rørbeck Nørreby, and Astrid Ag. From the Stockholm University team: Christopher Stroud, Caroline Kerfoot, Natalia Ganuza, Linus Salö, David Karlander, and Linnea Hanell. Other scholars, e.g. Heini Lehtonen, Maria Rydell, Marta Kirilova and Luke Holmes and others, joined in as the project proceeded.
Archived project
Through case studies of language practices in spaces understood as inherently translocal and multi-layered (classrooms and schools, youth spaces, mercantile spaces and nation-states), this book explores the relevance of superdiversity for the social and human sciences and positions it as a research perspective in sociolinguistics and beyond.