Janko Šet

Janko Šet
Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts | ZRC SAZU · Jovan Hadži Institute of Biology

Master of Science

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5
Publications
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Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Adult body size, development time, and growth rates are components of organismal life histories, which crucially influence fitness and are subject to trade-offs. If selection is sex-specific, male and female developments can eventually lead to different optimal sizes. This can be achieved through developmental plasticity and sex-specific developmen...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examines the role of personality traits, interpersonal relationships , and sociodemographic factors on perceived stress, related to COVID-19, and compliance with measures to mitigate its spread. Data were collected in the midst of the 'first wave' lockdown, with the survey completed in full by 963 participants. We measured stress,...
Article
Full-text available
The current COVID-19 pandemic caught the decision makers in many countries sub-optimally prepared to respond. To better cope with similar situations in the future, it is vital to understand the major predictors of health-beneficial behavior and adherence to imposed mitigation measures and guidelines. To tailor the promotion of government-imposed me...
Preprint
The present study examines the role of personality traits, interpersonal relationships, and sociodemographic factors on perceived stress, related to COVID-19, and compliance with measures to mitigate the spread of the virus. Data were collected in the midst of the ‘first wave’ lockdown, with the survey completed in full by 963 participants. Importa...
Preprint
Objective: To investigate the perception and adherence to mitigation measures during the first wave of the COVID-19 epidemic in Slovenia by examining their trends across several sociodemographic categories and personality dimensions. Methods: Descriptive and correlative analyses were used to examine which sociodemographic and personality factors we...

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Project (1)
Project
Females and males commonly differ in the expression of traits. The evolution of sexual dimorphism requires sex-specific selection and at least partly independent genetic variation between the sexes. However, females and males share an almost identical genome that constrains the sexes to respond independently to the selection and may result in a stage when one or both sexes express traits outside their optima. Quantitative genetics provides tools to predict the extent to which the evolution of sexual dimorphism is genetically constrained between sexes by assessing the cross-sex genetic correlation. The cross‐sex genetic correlation can be estimated as rmf =COVAmf∕sqrt(VAf ∗VAm), where COVAmf is the additive genetic covariance between the sexes, and VAm and VAf are additive genetic variances of males and females, respectively. When is close to unity, the sexes are assumed to have a nearly identical genetic architecture for the trait and evolution of sexual dimorphism should be constrained; close to zero values of rmf indicate complete independence in the genetic architecture of the trait between males and females and thus sex independent evolution. A cross‐sex genetic correlation between zero and one suggests that some of the genes acting on the shared trait already differ between males and females and indicates a further possibility for the evolution of sexual dimorphism in the trait. In this project, we aim to assess genetic variances and cross‐sex genetic correlations of size in an extremely sexually-size dimorphic spider, Nephilinis cruentata. In these spiders, females are considerably larger than males, they weigh more than 70X more than males. Our preliminary analyses found rmf close to zero suggesting that females and males do not share genetic architecture for size, indicates a resolved intra-locus sexual conflict and potential for further sex independent evolution of size. The result reflects differences in the effects of sexual and natural selection on body size between the sexes. The amount of genetic variation is significantly lower in females compared to males implying that females have been under the stronger directional selection (for fecundity) compared to males that are more plastic.