Janire Prudencio

Janire Prudencio
University of Granada | UGR · Department of Theoretical Physics and the Cosmos

PhD Earth Sciences - Volcano Seismology

About

58
Publications
22,343
Reads
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537
Citations
Citations since 2016
31 Research Items
507 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100
Additional affiliations
November 2018 - present
University of Granada
Position
  • Contratado Juan de la Cierva - incorporación
August 2016 - August 2018
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2015 - July 2016
Georgia State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2010 - September 2013
University of Granada
Field of study
October 2008 - June 2010
University of Granada
Field of study
September 2006 - June 2008
University of Granada
Field of study

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Full-text available
For the first time, we obtained high-resolution images of Earth's interior of the La Palma volcanic eruption that occurred in 2021 derived during the eruptive process. We present evidence of a rapid magmatic rise from the base of the oceanic crust under the island to produce an eruption that was active for 85 days. This eruption is interpreted as a...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Deception Island is the gateway for tourists to Antarctica and a laboratory to understand ice‐capped volcanoes and their eruptions. While the Island has been the target of many geophysical studies, no clear tomographic model shows how deep eruptive pathways of its last eruptions have reached the surface in the 1960s and 1970s...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
El arco volcánico heleno es una región volcánica activa que ha de ser estudiado para su vigilancia. La isla de Santorini ha sido monitoreada para conocer la distribución espacial de la deformación desde 1992. Los satélites de Observación de la Tierra (EO) juegan un papel muy importante en el objetivo de monitorear el peligro de los volcanes. La Int...
Preprint
Full-text available
Seismic tomography provides a window into magmatic plumbing systems; however, obtaining sufficient data for ‘real-time’ imaging is challenging. Until now, syn-eruptive tomography has not been successfully demonstrated. For the first time, we obtained high-resolution images of Earth's interior during an ongoing volcanic eruption. We used data from 1...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The volcanic complex of Cumbre Vieja on the island of La Palma is in eruption (October 2021) with serious implications for the inhabits of the island. SAR interferometry has been used as an operational tool in order to monitoring active volcanoes. The current study concerns the application of DinSAR and MTInSAR-SBAS in the area using Sentinel 1 SLC...
Article
Full-text available
The polar regions provide valuable insights into the functioning of the Earth’s regulating systems. Conducting field research in such harsh and remote environments requires strong international cooperation, extended planning horizons, sizable budgets and long-term investment. Consequently, polar research is particularly vulnerable to societal and e...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first two-dimensional (2-D) spatial distribution of seismic scattering and intrinsic attenuation beneath the Aeolian Islands arc. The Aeolian Islands archipelago represents one of the best examples of a small dimension volcanic island arc characterised by the alternation of different structural domains. Using the seismic wave diffusi...
Article
Full-text available
We present a new three‐dimensional (3D) image of attenuation beneath Mt. Etna volcano based on the coda normalization method. Mt. Etna is an ideal natural laboratory for the application of new or unconventional tomography techniques owing to high levels of seismicity spanning a wide range of epicentral distances and depths. We retrieved seismic wav...
Conference Paper
The Geysers geothermal field is located in northern California and is the world's largest producer of geothermal energy. Previous studies found spatio-temporal variations in seismic velocity that are likely related to fluid injections and distributions within the reservoir. Because seismic attenuation may exhibit more sensitivity to fluid saturatio...
Article
Over the last decade machine learning has become increasingly popular for the analysis and characterization of volcano-seismic data. One of the requirements for the application of machine learning methods to the problem of classifying seismic time series is the availability of a training dataset; that is a suite of reference signals, with known cla...
Article
Unrest at Long Valley caldera (California) during the past few decades has been attributed to the ascent of hydrothermal fluids or magma recharge. The difference is critical for assessing volcanic hazard. To better constrain subsurface structures in the upper crust and to help distinguish between these two competing hypotheses for the origin of unr...
Article
Full-text available
We present 2-D attenuation images of the Mt Etna volcanic region on the basis of separation of intrinsic and scattering effects. The analysis presented here exploits a large active seismic database that fully covers the area under study. We observe that scattering effects dominate over intrinsic attenuation, suggesting that the region is very heter...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
2D and 3D attenuation structures of Mt. Etna have been obtained with measurements of diffusion model and codanormalization method, respectively, with the same data-set used to develop the 3D velocity tomography (Diaz-Moreno et al. 2016). We have obtained intrinsic and scattering 2D maps applying the diffusion model which is an approximation of the...
Article
Full-text available
We image seismic intrinsic ( Qi-1) and scattering ( Qs-1) attenuations in Long Valley Caldera, California, by analyzing more than 1,700 vertical component waveforms from local earthquakes. Observed energy envelopes are fit to the diffusion model and seismic attenuation images are produced using two-dimensional space weighting functions. Low intrins...
Article
We present a P-wave scattering image of the volcanic structures under Tenerife Island using the autocorrelation functions of P-wave vertical velocity fluctuations. We have applied a cluster analysis to total quality factor attenuation (\( {Q}_t^{-1} \)) and scattering quality factor attenuation (\( {Q}_{PSc}^{-1} \)) images to interpret the structu...
Article
Full-text available
In the Central Mediterranean region, the production of chemically diverse volcanic products (e.g., those from Mt. Etna and the Aeolian Islands archipelago) testifies to the complexity of the tectonic and geodynamic setting. Despite the large number of studies that have focused on this area, the relationships among volcanism, tectonics, magma ascent...
Article
Full-text available
Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) is one of the most closely monitored and studied volcanoes on the region. In January 2005, a multi-parametric international experiment was conducted that encompassed both Deception Island and its surrounding waters. We performed this experiment from aboard the Spanish oceanographic vessel ‘Hespérides’, and from...
Article
In this work we have done a 3D joint interpretation of magnetotelluric and seismic tomography models. Previously we have described different techniques to infer the inner structure of the Earth. We have focused on volcanic regions, specifically on Tenerife Island volcano (Canary Islands, Spain). In this area, magnetotelluric and seismic tomography...
Article
Full-text available
We present intrinsic- and scattering-Q attenuation images for Usu volcano (Japan) by analyzing over 1800 vertical seismograms. By fitting the observed envelopes to the diffusion model, we obtained intrinsic and scattering attenuation values at three different frequency bands. Using a back-projection method and assuming a Gaussian-type weighting fun...
Article
In this study we show 2D intrinsic- and scattering-Q images of Asama volcano obtained by analyzing 2320 waveforms from active data. Observed energy envelopes were fitted to the diffusion model and separate intrinsic- and scattering-Q images were produced using a back-projection method based on a Gaussian-type weighting function. Synthetic tests ind...
Article
Full-text available
The TOMO-ETNA experiment was devised to image of the crust underlying the volcanic edifice and, possibly, its plumbing system by using passive and active refraction/reflection seismic methods. This experiment included activities both on-land and offshore with the main objective of obtaining a new high-resolution seismic tomography to improve the kn...
Article
Full-text available
In the present paper we describe the on-land field operations integrated in the TOMO-ETNA experiment carried out in June-November 2014 at Mt. Etna volcano and surrounding areas. This terrestrial campaign consists in the deployment of 90 short-period portable three-component seismic stations, 17 broadband seismometers and the coordination with 133 p...
Article
Full-text available
This work describes the automatic picking of the P-phase arrivals of the 3*106 seismic registers originated during the TOMO-ETNA experiment. Air-gun shots produced by the vessel Sarmiento de Gamboa and contemporary passive seismicity occurring in the island are recorded by a dense network of stations deployed for the experiment. In such scenario, a...
Article
Full-text available
In this manuscript we present the new friendly seismic tomography software based on joint inversion of active and passive seismic sources called PARTOS (Passive Active Ray Tomography Software). This code has been developed on the base of two well-known widely used tomographic algorithms (LOTOS and ATOM-3D), providing a robust set of algorithms. The...
Article
Full-text available
Short period small magnitude seismograms mainly comprise scattered waves in the form of coda waves (the tail part of the seismogram, starting after S-waves and ending when the noise prevails), spanning more than 70 percent of the whole seismogram dura- tion. Corresponding coda envelopes provide important inShort period small magnitude seismograms m...
Conference Paper
We present the joint interpretation of two geophysical models obtained in the Tenerife Island. The geophysical data employed are complementary (seismic velocity and electrical resistivity). The 3D electrical resistivity structure of the island has been obtained trough 3D inversion of 148 magnetotelluric sites in the period range 0.001 to 10 s. Data...
Article
In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011–2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the pre- and syn-eruptive seismicit...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract This manuscript shows a new multidisciplinary interpretation approach of the internal structure of Tenerife island. The central core of this work is the determination of the three dimensional attenuation structure of the region using P-waves and the Coda Normalization (CN) method. This study has been performed using 45303 seismograms recor...
Article
Full-text available
The seismic and volcanological structure of Deception Island (Antarctica) is an intense focus topic in Volcano Geophysics. The interpretations given by scientists on the origin, nature, and location of the structures buried under the island strongly diverge. We present a high-resolution 3D P-wave attenuation tomography model obtained by using the c...
Article
In this work we present intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation 2D images of Stromboli volcano. We used 21953 waveforms from air-gun shots fired by an oceanographic vessel and recorded at 33 inland and 10 OBS seismic stations. Coda wave envelopes of the filtered seismic traces were fitted to the Energy Transport Equation in the diffusion appro...
Article
Full-text available
We present a 3-D model of P and S velocities beneath El Hierro Island, constructed using the traveltime data of more than 13 000 local earthquakes recorded by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN, Spain) in the period from 2011 July to 2012 September. The velocity models were performed using the LOTOS code for iterative passive source tomography....
Article
Full-text available
The complex volcanic system of Tenerife Island is known to have a highly heterogeneous character, as recently confirmed by velocity tomography. We present new information derived from intrinsic quality factor inverse maps (Qi-1), scattering quality factor inverse maps (Qs-1) and total quality factor inverse maps (Qt-1) obtained for the same region....
Article
Full-text available
In this work we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on Diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A three-dimensional S wave attenuation tomography of Tenerife island has been obtained with measurements of coda-normalization method. We used about 75000 waveforms relative to the dataset from an active seismic experiments using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at over 100 onshore seismic stations. The rays were traced in a 3D velocity model. Th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A three-dimensional S wave attenuation tomography of Deception Island has been obtained with measurements of coda-normalization method. We used about 52000 waveforms relative to the dataset from an active seismic experiment using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at over 100 onshore seismic stations. The rays were traced in a 3D velocity model. Th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In the present work we are going to analyze the same data-set used to develop the 3D velocity tomographies to realize 2D intrinsic and scattering attenuation tomography. For that we are going to apply the diffusion model which is an approximation of the general energy transport theory developed by Wegler et al. (2001) and Wegler (2003). So, this ne...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The main objective of the MED-SUV-ISES project is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in eastern Sicily (southern Italy) by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna and the Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of in-situ marine and land experiments and observations, and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment, will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint upper mantle-crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. The core of the study is based on the active seismic experiment that will use energy sources on land and at sea. These signals will be recorded by seismic stations deployed on land and in the seafloor together with the permanent seismic network belonging to the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV, Italy). A temporary dense seismic network composed by at least 100 seismometers and at least 20-24 OBSs, both belonging to different institutions, will be deployed respectively on land and on the sea bottom. Seismic signals will be generated by using onshore chemical explosions along a series of profiles covering the eastern part of the island of Sicily. Marine signals will be generated using air-guns emplaced on an oceanographic research vessel. Parallel with the process of shooting with air-guns we will take data using marine magnetometer and gravimeter in order to complete the information. Aside the main objective, it is planned to achieve also further goals such as: - characterization of the volcanic processes through cutting-edge data analysis/modelling. This objective is aimed at improving the knowledge on the volcanic sub-surface or surface processes during the pre-, syn-, and post-eruptive of Etna and the Aeolian volcanoes by fully exploiting the integrate marine and terrestrial data set, - development of the next generation of monitoring and observing systems. During the experiment is planned to use and test new hydrophones implemented by UTM-CSIC to record acoustic marine signals, OBSs and seismometers, - teaching at high-level (post graduated student) in geophysics and volcanic hazards. It is expected that some of the personnel involved in the experiment, both onboard and ashore, are Master or PhD students belonging to different countries involved in the project. The experiment provides a unique opportunity to learn both experimental marine and terrestrial techniques, - dissemination. This objective is aimed at broadcasting the outcomes of the project to the scientific community and the general public. This objective will include information distribution in different websites, networking with ongoing national and international ventures rooted in the volcanological community, preparation of a TV documentary and others. The results of the experiment, integrated with previous geophysical surveys (e.g., gravity, magnetotellurics, etc.), will improve the current knowledge of the crust beneath Mt. Etna volcano and of the physical processes controlling magma ascent by cutting-edge modelling. Modelling of ground deformation will benefit from the outcomes of the seismic experiment, as the improvement of knowledge of the physical and geometrical parameters of the internal structure of Mt. Etna and its basement will increase the accuracy and robustness of the cut-edge numerical models (e.g. Finite Element or Boundary Element Methods). The experiment will provide a great number of innovative elements, of which: - the seismic tomography, which will simultaneously integrate, for the first time in a volcano context, passive sources (earthquakes and LP events), marine active air-gun shootings, and borehole on-land explosions, - seismic data will be recorded by a great number of seismic stations, that will range from Ocean Bottom Seismometers, Hydrophones, Seismic antennas to permanent and portable on-land seismic stations, - it will be the first time that such a kind of experiment will cover such a wide and heterogeneous region as that selected for the experiment, including more than two volcanic environments and more than five active volcanoes, - the expected image of the area will be the deepest ever obtained in previous research works, - the final images will result from the integration of seismic data and other geophysical surveys performed during both terrestrial and marine observations such as magnetic, gravimetric and magnetotelluric among others. Note that more detailed information on the acquisition methodology will be provided later on. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several societal sectors. It is transversal since the project will apply marine and terrestrial sciences and merge the observations to address multiple scientific issues in order to obtain an unified Earth Crust and Upper Mantle model. It is multidisciplinary as different Earth Science disciplines such as Seismology, Gravimetry, Geomorphology, Magnetic Field and others, will be combined. Additionally, experiments, technical development and numerical modelling, will be also integrated. Several societal sectors such as Volcanology, Civil Protection, Risk Management and Educational levels will benefit from the outcomes of the project.
Project
Volcanoes represent the most complex geological features, which characterize the first 10 km of the Earth crust. They are the site of extreme phenomena affecting the human life and civil society, so that the detailed knowledge of their dynamics is one of the most important goal that the Earth Sciences are called to solve in the next years. There is a twofold aspect that needs to be addressed in order to achieve this important result: understanding the volcano geological structure and the dynamics associated with their eruptions. The first aspect is strictly related to the second one, as the details of the volcano geology change after and/or during the eruptions. In addition, seismicity often accompanies the eruptions, becoming one of the most characteristic “sign” (and often “precursor”) of their occurring. The study of this seismicity is thus crucial for the future development of the research and of risk plans. The present project wants to contribute in this twofold aspect. On one hand we want to focus onto the details of the geological structure of important volcanoes; on the other we want to face with dynamical aspects of fluid movements that are associated with volcanic eruptions and that generate seismic waves propagating inside the volcanoes. In other words we want to study the “seismic velocity” and “seismic attenuation” structures and use this information for both understanding the volcano dynamics and to correct the the spectra of the observed seismic waves for the effects of propagation, thus obtaining a “focused” seismic image of the sources. The final goal of the project is an improvement of the early warning protocols and of the volcanic risk models. The current project research team is an international consortium of universities and European and American research centres with an extensive experience in the study of active volcanoes and the work topics proposed in this work. The project is transverse and multi-disciplinary at many different levels. Even if it can be framed within the field of volcanic seismology, the volume of data registered, the techniques to be applied, the results expected and the disciplines involved clearly extend such framework. In such way, seismology elements are combined with seismic prospecting, gravimetry, magnetism, geology, geomorphology, or volcanic and tectonic dynamics among others. The project is based on data acquisition during field campaigns added to the computational analysis of such data. The laboratory analysis is based not only in the data processing but also in theoretical applications of computational seismology like wave propagation models or theoretical attenuation models. Data inversion, 3-D tomography of velocity and attenuation, gravimetric and magnetic models and geochemistry data will be combined to create a structural model of the zone based on the combination of data using SIG systems, geomorphology and geological data. All of this will permit the establishment of the zones' local, regional and tectonic context of volcanic dynamics. The complete characterization of the geodynamical environment will therefore be achieved.
Project
This project will improve the consortium capacity of assessment of volcanic hazards in Supersites of Southern Italy by optimising and integrating existing and new observation/monitoring systems, by a breakthrough in understanding of volcanic processes and by increasing the effectiveness of the coordination between the scientific and end-user communities. More than 3 million of people are exposed to potential volcanic hazards in a large region in the Mediterranean Sea, where two among the largest European volcanic areas are located: Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei/Vesuvius. This project will fully exploit the unique detailed long-term in-situ monitoring data sets available for these volcanoes and integrate with Earth Observation (EO) data, setting the basic tools for a significant step ahead in the discrimination of pre-, syn- and post-eruptive phases. The wide range of styles and intensities of volcanic phenomena observed on these volcanoes, which can be assumed as archetypes of ’closed conduit ‘ and ‘open conduit’ volcano, together with the long-term multidisciplinary data sets give an exceptional opportunity to improve the understanding of a very wide spectrum of geo-hazards, as well as implementing and testing a large variety of innovative models of ground deformation and motion. Important impacts on the European industrial sector are expected, arising from a partnership integrating the scientific community and SMEs to implement together new observation/monitoring sensors/systems. Specific experiments and studies will be carried out to improve our understanding of the volcanic internal structure and dynamics, as well as to recognise signals related to impending unrest or eruption. Hazard quantitative assessment will benefit by the outcomes of these studies and by their integration into the cutting edge monitoring approaches thus leading to a step-change in hazard awareness and preparedness and leveraging the close relationship between scientists, SMEs, and end-users. WP 5 This WP is devoted to improve the knowledge of the processes occurring at Mt. Etna. It aims at providing a scientific and modelling framework to forecasting the short-term evolution of future eruptive events, estimating the volume of magma feeding an eruption, the temporal trends in magma and gas emission rates, the spatial/temporal evolution and volume of lava flows; the physical characteristics (dispersal, grain-size distribution and optical depth in atmosphere) of the eruptive plumes and the total mass of pyroclastic fall deposits. Questions addressed will be: storage, evolution, dynamics of the magma in the plumbing system; interaction between the magmatism and tectonics; quantification and modelling of subsurface and surface processes. We will focus on the major threatening phenomena: the violent short-lived or long-lasting explosive events (lava fountains), both producing consistent volcanic plumes, the opening of mid- and low-altitude eruptive fissures, the surface faulting and the reactivation of landslides. Test cases well monitored by EO and in-situ data in recent years (e.g., the 2001 or 2002-03 eruptions, 2011 explosives events at the SE crater) will be used to cross-calibrate studies on earlier devastating eruptions (e.g., 122 B.C., 1669 ad) that may represent “end-members” of the hazard at Mt. Etna. We will use data mining methods to rapidly detect anomalies on the huge multiparametric data set. Specific laboratory and field experiments will be performed to constrain the physical and chemical parameters of rocks/magma in complement to the seismic tomography.which will be partly performed through a marine experiment supported by UGR during a cruise of the R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa. Mt. Etna has a nearly continuous activity, with eruptions that strongly impacts its surroundings and require near real-time updating and assessment. We will quantitatively characterize eruptions by improving the performance and extending the monitoring capability with improved ground systems and the systematic use of EO data (SAR and optical imagery) and ground based imagery (HD, high-speed, and TIR cameras, DOAS and FTIR spectrometers) including active sensors (LIDAR and Doppler Radar). Ash aggregation/settling experiments will help constraining plume dispersal simulations. Results of the ongoing “Vamos Seguro” project on volcano plume monitoring in the central Mediterranean area will also be used. WP5 includes four tasks. Task 1 concerns the observations of the threatening phenomena (explosive and effusive events, dyke injection, earthquakes and landslides). Task 2 focuses on the theoretical frame for the volcano dynamics. Task 3 is on the structural frame gathering the various observations with emphasis on new seismic experiments. Task 4 focuses on shared model, software and input/output and visualization conventions that will allow communication between teams. Task 5.3 Mt Etna structure (UGR) The main activity and the first four sub-tasks will be around passive and active seismic experiments. The last two sub-task will be on the constraints from gravity and other geophysical data and on constraints from laboratory experiments. Sub-Task 5.3.1 Investigation of the Etna structure by an active source experiment (TOMO_ETNA) We plan during 2013 an active seismic tomography experiment by means of active refraction/reflection seismic investigations, carried out both on-land (explosion in deep boreholes), and offshore, by airgun shots registered onshore too. Ocean Bottom Seismometers/Hydrophones (OBS/H) as well as land stations will be deployed during the experiment and completed with the permanent seismic array. The experiment consists of long (50-70 km), inland and submarine, 2D seismic profiles recording inland deep boreholes explosions and air gun shots at dense inland stations and OBS/H streams. Firstly, 2D velocity and attenuation tomography along the best sampled profile will be performed. In particular, the 2D attenuation tomography will be obtained inverting both Qi and Qs values. Following, the data of the active experiment will be integrated with the passive seismic ones, derived by local earthquake recorded in the last 10 years, into a unique three-dimensional structural-volcanological model of the volcano. This structural model will be compared in integrated with the results from Sub-Task 5.3.5.(Team: UGR, UDUR, INGV) Sub-Task 5.3.2 High-resolution 3D vs. 4D seismic velocity and attenuation tomography This Task is aimed in applying standard and advanced tomographic techniques in order to model seismic data recorded during the last ten years (several thousands of local earthquakes) together with those acquired in occasion of the active seismic experiment (Sub-Task 5.3.1). The main goal is to better define the Mt. Etna’s plumbing system and to locate crustal magma reservoirs and other crustal and upper mantle relevant discontinuities. Long-range correlation of seismic noise will also be investigated (Team: INGV, UDUR, BRGM).