Janice Bland

Janice Bland
Nord University | HIBO · Faculty of Education and Arts

Professor (Full)

About

61
Publications
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207
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Introduction
Janice Mary Bland is a teacher educator in English Language and Literature Teaching. She is Professor of English Education, Nord University, Norway, and also Professor II at OsloMet University, Norway. Janice is editor-in-chief of the diamond open-access journal Children's Literature in English Language Education http://clelejournal.org/ and has been invited speaker to UK, Turkey, Germany, United Arab Emirates, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Greece, Finland and Japan.

Publications

Publications (61)
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This book is about the teaching of English to young learners in school settings. While several of the chapters cover issues that are relevant for all foreign language teaching to a young age group, others relate specifically to English for young learners (EYL). In this book the term primary refers to children from circa five years of age to circa e...
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The introduction examines English literature in language education in school settings. The chapter focuses on the importance of encouraging deep reading and the developing of a reading community by means of taking part in language-dependent activities – reading, creative writing, viewing, talking around the texts and many text-related tasks. The re...
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Both language and content are involved in all holistic, content-based approaches to language education with young learners. This chapter argues that waiting until children are old enough to study adult literature creates a delay in their affective, cognitive and literacy development that may be difficult to reverse. The formats and characteristics...
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This chapter focuses on the opportunities of deep reading for in-depth learning. By in-depth learning, not only deepening but also widening of English teaching is meant – embracing cross-curricular learning on subjects that are interdisciplinary and relevant for students’ out-of-school lives. The importance of connectedness for in-depth learning is...
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This paper explores the demanding and complex nature of English language teaching with young learners. The paper begins with the challenges of the young learner classroom, then goes on to argue that the low estimation of teaching languages in primary education can seriously impact the confidence and efficacy of primary-school teachers. The popular...
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Forskning om undervisning och lärande The significance of story and responding to story is at the centre of this issue: the importance of literacy and literature for children’s own worlds in the here and now, the meanings shared through their readings and writings, and their reflective and critical response to the creations of storytellers. The ch...
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CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION Teacher education for language and literature teaching has to do with the content of courses as well as how the content can be taught in the target settings – for readers of this journal usually the primary or secondary school.
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In this editorial, Janice Bland discusses how English in school settings is centrally and crucially located both in education and in global issues, so that pedagogy and ideology are inextricably linked. Research on children’s and young adult literary texts in educational contexts and English language teaching are naturally immersed in ideology issu...
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In the editorial for Children's Literature in English Language Education journal, Janice Bland comments on the OECD 2021 publication, 21st-Century Readers: Developing Literacy Skills in a Digital World, the connections between book reading and digital literacy and the ramifications for language education and children’s literature pedagogy.
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The recognition that the field of subject pedagogy (or subject didactics) is central to teacher education is steadily growing (Niemi, 2016, p. 29). But there are still problems worldwide regarding the recognition of subject pedagogy as a research field, particularly in English for young learners in grades 1–7 (Bland, 2019). This is not helped by th...
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An important goal of intercultural learning is the building of confidence to communicate with different cultural groups with sensitivity and interculturality. In this chapter, I will illustrate how a stirring literary portrayal of the refugee experience can provide a kind of magical mirror, drawing us into a different world where we encounter other...
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This paper examines how student teachers and language learners might learn to question perspectives and develop critical literacy through critiquing of texts. Focusing on work in an in-service teacher education course, the discussion explores how to help English language learners to read text representations critically, in order to identify harmful...
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Children's Literature in English Language Education journal http://clelejournal.org/
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Children's Literature in English Language Education Editorial of Volume 7, issue 2
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This chapter begins with the pervasive role of stories in human culture. Subsequently oral storytelling with young learners is distinguished from the sharing of picturebooks, and the concept of a story template is introduced. Orality and oracy are differentiated; and the oral nature of tales and storytelling is examined with regard to patterned, fo...
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With the editorial, Extensive Reading and Deep Reading in ELT, Janice Bland discusses issues around the canon and non-canonical texts, extensive reading and deep reading.
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For volume 6, issue 2 of CHILDREN'S LITERATURE AND ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION, Janice Bland and Sandie Mourão reflect in their editorial on the affordances of children’s literature for supporting and developing a plurilingual space in the ELT classroom.
Book
Covering Green's The Fault in Our Stars, Collins' The Hunger Games, Selznick's The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Rowling's Wizarding World, Staake's Bluebird and Winton's Lockie Leonard, contributors consider how literature can be used for teaching literary literacy, creative writing, intercultural learning, critical pedagogy and deep reading in school...
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Scholars have criticized for at least two decades that ELT textbooks too often concentrate their cultural references on what have been termed BANA countries – Britain, North America and Australasia. This in no way reflects the reality of English use throughout the world in the Anglosphere, in other countries of the West where English is not the maj...
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The format of the novel is evolving, as are the literacy needs of our students. Visual literacy, literary literacy, critical literacy and information literacy are competences that must be trained across the curriculum. Yet, it is undoubtedly the ELT classroom that offers most opportunities for this training due to the enormous diversity of English-...
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Janice Bland and Sandie Mourão consider how the local becomes ever more diverse and the global becomes ever more local, and the role of language learning in supporting our ability to change perspective becomes ever more urgent.
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http://clelejournal.org/editorial-the-shapeshifting-nature-of-childrens-literature-for-elt/
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In the EFL primary and secondary-school classroom there will be found a huge diversity of readers and reading practices. Although most young students on entering secondary school will already have a sense of story, and functional literacy in their mother-tongue, they will also bring with them preferences for certain types of narrative such as adven...
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This paper considers ideological dimensions of language education, and the contribution picturebooks narrating diversity and illustrating minority perspectives can make to this important aspect of English Language Teaching. It is argued that both representation of language and representation of the world must be taken into consideration in diversit...
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Cognitive criticism sees literature as a powerful and versatile instrument of human thought. Maria Nikolajeva discusses in her monograph Reading for Learning. Cognitive approaches to children’s literature the essential role fiction plays in the cognitive and emotional development of readers. As a fast-developing preoccupation of international child...
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This is the fourth volume in the important series initiated in 2007 for the EFL-literature classroom in Germany: WVT-Handbücher zur Literatur- und Kulturdidaktik. The series aims to supply the much-needed dialogue between literature and cultural studies scholarship, theory of literature pedagogy (Literaturdidaktik) and methodology for the EFL class...
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Each paper in this issue throws light on picturebooks for primary and secondary-school teaching, and how a careful selection can support the child’s cultural identity in the language classroom.
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This paper considers the support provided by multimodal children's literature in the development of literacy. The focus is on reading in a second language and the negotiation of understanding due to information gaps in the narrative, and on reading pleasure due to sensory anchoring through pictures. The development of deep reading is differentiated...
Book
English is fast becoming a core subject in the curriculum in primary schools worldwide. The discipline is expanding rapidly, even urgently, but with far less attention to date from second language researchers and educational theorists than TEFL with secondary students or adults. Teacher educators, practitioners and student teachers will find this b...
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This chapter describes how an early awareness of lexical patterns, grammatical categories and grammatical judgements can be supported through an active engagement with poetry for children. Although acquired as unanalysed wholes in the primary school, formulaic sequences can provide young learners with an inventory of illustrative exemplars, which m...
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Welcome to the fourth issue of the CLELEjournal! Although CLELE is the acronym for Children’s Literature in English Language Education, this does not mean the journal focuses only on pre-teens. Children’s literature is an umbrella term that is usually considered by scholars to include young adult literature, oral literature, film, digital media and...
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This article introduces FREE? Stories Celebrating Human Rights (Walker Books 2009), an anthology of fourteen short stories commissioned by Amnesty International to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The stories by well-established children’s authors of world literature in English offer compelling, often h...
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This chapter suggests a global perspective may be effectively incorporated into existing curricula of English language and literature teaching. Affording students the opportunity to develop a sense of global citizenship may encourage much-needed optimism in a problematic world, helping students develop an awareness of their responsibility as global...
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Language itself, second language acquisition and poetry all rely on repeated patterns. Children delight in these patterns, which support functional literacy. Mini narrative poems are important in the language classroom, in order that young learners can create mental models of the storyworld and mental representations of the language. Acting out the...
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There is abundant research confirming that we pass through three stages on the path to full development of literacy, which includes the acquisition of academic language. The stages are: hearing stories, doing a great deal of self-selected reading, followed by reading for our own interest in our chosen specialization. At stages two and three, the re...
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http://clelejournal.org/the-hunger-games-an-ecocritical-reading/ This paper examines how a popular series like Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games trilogy can motivate students to improve their language and literacy proficiency by extensive reading. Moving on from there, we argue a thoughtful and collaborative deep reading of The Hunger Games can br...
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This chapter considers whether the use of children’s literature in language education can support an eco-consciousness, as possibly the first step towards pragmatic environmentalism. Major children’s literature often deals with themes that are invaluable for a critical, dialogic pedagogy, and this chapter puts forward opportunities for ecopedagogy...
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Susan Cooper's time-slip novel King of Shadows (Cooper 1999, Carnegie Medal short-listed) throws light on its pretext A Midsummer Night's Dream and Shakespearian theatre. This is sometimes known as 'Shakespearing' children's literature, as it draws some of the cultural capital of Shakespeare into the epitext of the contemporary work. Adrian Mitchel...
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The application of drama in teaching English to young learners (TEYL) is not new, but its potential remains underdeveloped. One reason for this is that teachers are often not fully aware of its benefits or how to apply it in their teaching. In this chapter, I argue that it must be introduced and rehearsed in teacher education in order to attain a w...
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Bringing together leading scholars and teacher educators from across the world, from Europe and the USA to Asia, this book presents the latest research and new perspectives into the uses of children's literature in second language teaching for children and young adults. Children's Literature in Second Language Education covers such topics as extens...
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The previous chapter examined uses of fairy tales, which derive originally from oral culture, for meaningful literary literacy in the EFL-literature classroom. In this chapter, I argue that the playful language of children's culture, which includes children's literature, is a challenge to perceived language/literature and oracy/literacy dichotomies...
Book
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Children's literature can be a powerful way to encourage and empower EFL students but is less commonly used in the classroom than adult literature. This text provides a comprehensive introduction to children's and young adult literature in EFL teaching. It demonstrates the complexity of children's literature and how it can encourage an active commu...
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This chapter begins with a differentiation of extensive and intensive reading, referring to the 'Harry Potter' series. The paper goes on to compare canonical and non-canonical texts and graded readers for in-depth, intensive reading in the literature EFL classroom. Literary devices that can be identified to support learner autonomy are outlined – s...
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In this paper I suggest that the theory of literature in education (Literaturdidaktik) should be one of the analytical frameworks for L2 teaching in the young learner classroom and particularly across the transition from the primary to the secondary classroom. The narrative technique of the graphic language in picturebooks, and interplay between im...
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Children’s earliest experience with literary texts is of the utmost importance. Literary picture books can provide a stress-free beginning. Practising the skill of visual literacy means searching for meanings in pictures, and interpreting what the pictures tell us. Children are good at finding meanings in pictures, and teachers can help children di...
Conference Paper
In: Mehlhorn, Grit / Neveling, Christiane / Schramm, Karen (eds.): Grenzen überschreiten –sprachlich – fachlich – kulturell, Kongress-Dokumentation des 23. Kongresses für Fremdsprachendidaktik in Leipzig, 312-314.
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Taking part in a school play is often one of the most memorable experiences in childhood, and is tremendously rewarding. In exchange for hard work and effort, a class can gain a terrific sense of achievement, the appreciation of parents and the school community, great gains in language and social skills, and plenty of pleasure! Role-playing, like a...

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Projects

Projects (9)
Project
The main aim of this three-year ERASMUS + KA203 project, which focuses on innovation in the Higher Education and School Education Sectors, is to strengthen the profile of the teaching profession through the development of practitioner competencies to confidently integrate intercultural citizenship education (ICE) into early EFL education. The target group is the school community – practitioners (teachers of English, teacher librarians, student teachers), children aged 5 to 12 years, and teacher educators. https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/projects/eplus-project-details/#project/2019-1-PT01-KA203-061353
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The ELLiL project pioneers a new model for teaching practice, promoting the agency and creativity of student teachers in English teaching and learning through literature. We aim to develop English learning as a window of opportunity for creative, socially relevant education – deep reading for in-depth learning. The main project target group is student teachers on university programmes for teaching in grades 1 – 10.
Project
The aim of the ICEPELL project is to support practitioners to confidently integrate intercultural citizenship education into their EFL lessons and library sessions with children aged 5 to 12 years. How will the ICEPELL consortium do this? • Design a 25-hour professional development course for pre- and in-service teachers of English and school librarians • Develop teaching packs around picturebooks in English • Publish a handbook on the theory and practice of using picturebooks to integrate ICE into early EFL teaching for practitioners and teacher educators • Organise local and international dissemination events • Facilitate an Open Educational Resources platform on e-Twinning to foster communities of practice and enable students to interact and take action across borders.