Jani Heino

Jani Heino
University of Oulu · Department of Geography

PhD
Moving to University of Oulu as of August 15th... :-)

About

323
Publications
162,514
Reads
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13,857
Citations
Introduction
My research interests centre on ecology and biogeography to tackle issues of biodiversity, conservation, monitoring and environmental change at large spatial and temporal scales. I also have recently become more and more interested in joint historical changes in the environment, biota and human civilizations. Web site: https://www.globiogeo.com
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - August 2022
Finnish Environment Institute
Position
  • Senior Researcher
August 2014 - July 2018
Finnish Environment Institute
Position
  • Professor
January 2011 - July 2014
University of Oulu
Position
  • University Researcher
Education
January 1999 - December 2002
University of Jyväskylä
Field of study
  • Limnology
September 1993 - November 1997
University of Oulu
Field of study
  • Animal Ecology

Publications

Publications (323)
Article
1.Arctic regions support a wide variety of freshwater ecosystems. These naturally oligotrophic and cold‐water streams, rivers, ponds and lakes are currently being impacted by a diversity of anthropogenic pressures, such as accelerated climate change, permafrost thaw, land‐use change, eutrophication, brownification, and the replacement of northern b...
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The Anthropocene presents formidable threats to freshwater ecosystems. Lakes are especially vulnerable and important at the same time. They cover only a small area worldwide but harbour high levels of biodiversity and contribute disproportionately to ecosystem services. Lakes differ with respect to their general type (e.g. land‐locked, drainage, fl...
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1. Freshwater ecosystems and their biota are more seriously threatened than their marine and terrestrial counterparts. A solution to halt increasing negative impacts of anthropogenic development would be to reconsider the basics of nature conservation (i.e. protection of pristine and near-pristine areas) and restoration (i.e. returning an impacted...
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Aim We propose a novel approach that considers taxonomic uniqueness, functional uniqueness and environmental uniqueness and show how it can be used in guiding conservation planning. We illustrate the approach using data for lake biota and environment. Location Lake Puruvesi, Finland. Methods We sampled macrophytes and macroinvertebrates from the...
Article
Geodiversity is an emerging, multi-faceted concept in Earth and environmental sciences. Knowledge on geo-diversity is crucial for understanding functions of natural systems and in guiding sustainable development. Despite the critical nature of geodiversity information, data acquisition and analytical methods have lagged behind the conceptual develo...
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We examined the functional strategies and the trait space of 596 European taxa of freshwater macroinvertebrates characterized by 63 fuzzy coded traits belonging to 11 trait groups. Principal component analysis was used to reduce trait dimensionality, to explain ecological strategies, and to quantify the trait space occupied by taxa. Null models wer...
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An intensively debated issue in ecology is whether the variations in the biodiversity patterns of different biological groups are congruent in space and time. In addition, ecologists have recognized the necessity of accounting for both taxonomic and functional facets when analysing spatial and temporal congruence patterns. This study aimed to deter...
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Aim: Understanding the variation in community composition and species abundances (i.e., β-diversity) is at the heart of community ecology. A common approach to examine β-diversity is to evaluate directional variation in community composition by measuring the decay in the similarity among pairs of communities along spatial or environmental distance...
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Context A core theme in ecohydrology is understanding how hydrology affects spatial variation in the composition of species assemblages (i.e., beta diversity). However, most empirical evidence is from research in upland rivers spanning small spatial extents. Relatively little is known of the consequences of hydrological variation for beta diversity...
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Globalization has led to the introduction of thousands of alien species worldwide. With growing impacts by invasive species, understanding the invasion process remains critical for predicting adverse effects and informing efficient management. Theoretically, invasion dynamics have been assumed to follow an “invasion curve” (S-shaped curve of availa...
Article
The accelerated eutrophication of freshwater lakes has become an environmental problem worldwide. Increasing numbers of studies highlight the need to incorporate functional and phylogenetic information of species into bioassessment programms, but it is still poorly understood how eutrophication affects multiple diversity facets of freshwater commun...
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To improve our understanding on the temporal aspects of metacommunity structure, we focused on benthic macroinvertebrates collected seasonally (i.e., wet, drying, dry and rewetting seasons) in Dongting Lake, a large subtropical floodplain lake in China. We employed the elements of metacommunity structure (EMS) framework and variation partitioning t...
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Global freshwater biodiversity is declining dramatically, and meeting the challenges of this crisis requires bold goals and the mobilisation of substantial resources. While the reasons are varied, investments in both research and conservation of freshwater biodiversity lag far behind those in the terrestrial and marine realms. Inspired by a global...
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The cover image is based on the Viewpoint A global agenda for advancing freshwater biodiversity research by Alain Maasri et al., https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13931. Image Credit: Solvin Zankl. image
Article
Conversion of forests to urban land-use in the processes of urbanization is one of the major causes of biotic homogenization (i.e., decline in beta diversity) in freshwater ecosystems, threating ecosystem functioning and services. However, empirical studies exploring urban land-use shaping patterns of taxonomic and functional beta diversities and t...
Preprint
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Understanding the capacity of ecological systems to withstand and recover from disturbances is a major challenge for ecological research in the context of environmental change. Disturbances have multi-scale effects: they can cause species extinctions locally and alter connectivity between habitat patches at the metacommunity level. Yet, our underst...
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Aim: Disentangling the drivers of community assembly and species diversity in space and time is critical to elucidating metacommunity theory. However, our understanding of how metacommunity structuring will change over time remains insufficient, especially in rivers in the monsoon climate zone. We examined whether 1) the idealized metacommunity str...
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River networks are among Earth’s most threatened hot-spots of biodiversity and provide key ecosystem services (e.g., supply drinking water and food, climate regulation) essential to sustaining human well-being. Climate change and increased human water use are causing more rivers and streams to dry, with devastating impacts on biodiversity and ecosy...
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Deterministic and stochastic processes are two major factors shaping community dynamics, but their relative importance remains unknown for many aquatic systems, including those in the high‐elevation Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. Here, we explored the causes of multidimensional beta diversity patterns (i.e., taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic) of a ma...
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Many studies have shown that biodiversity regulates a multitude of ecological functions that are needed to maintain the productivity and efficiency of a variety of types of ecosystems. What is not known is how human activities may change the ‘multifunctionality’ of ecosystems as they have both direct impacts on ecosystems and indirect effects on th...
Article
Effects of dam operation and extraction of water from rivers on spatial variation in hydrological regimes, and consequences for freshwater biodiversity, are widely predicted but seldom assessed empirically. Evidence of linkages between hydrology and beta diversity contributes to water-management decisions to support landscape-scale biodiversity and...
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The negative impact of urbanization on biodiversity can be buffered by blue (e.g., rivers, ponds) and green (e.g., parks, forests) spaces. However, to prevent biodiversity loss and reduce the risk of local extinctions, blue and green spaces need to be connected by corridors, so that organisms may disperse between sites. Landscape connectivity affec...
Article
We evaluated the beta diversity patterns of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages at two spatial scales in streams in the Eastern Amazon, as well as tested whether environmental and spatial factors affected these assemblage patterns differently for non-flying (i.e., shrimps) and flying (i.e., insects) macroinvertebrate groups. Fifteen streams were...
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Regional‐scale ecological processes, such as the spatial flows of material, energy, and organisms, are fundamental for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in river networks. Yet these processes remain largely overlooked in most river management practices and underlying policies. Here, we propose adoption of a meta‐system approach, wh...
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Inland aquatic ecosystems, such as streams, rivers, ponds and lakes, play an important role in maintaining global aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services. They have been increasingly influenced by environmental change such as global warming, dam construction, habitat fragmentation, eutrophication and urbanization. However, our understanding of...
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A multi-faceted approach is needed to better understand how the beta diversity of aquatic assemblages responds to ecological gradients. Using distance-based RDA and variance partitioning, we explored the different components of total beta diversity (replacement and richness difference) based on taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic data of aquati...
Article
An understanding of the consequences of human-mediated disturbances from multi-facet diversity (i.e. species, functional and phylogenetic) perspectives is of great significance in biodiversity assessment and conservation planning. Most previous studies have concentrated on anthropogenic effects on species diversity in the Yellow River Basin (YRB) i...
Article
Iron (Fe) is an important element in aquatic ecosystems worldwide because it is intimately tied with multiple abiotic and biotic phenomena. Here, we give a survey of manifold influences of Fe, and the key factors affecting it in the boreal catchments and their waters. It includes the perspectives of biogeochemistry, hydrology, ecology, and river ba...
Article
Body size descriptors and associated resemblance measurements may provide useful tools for forecasting ecological responses to increasing anthropogenic land‒use disturbances. Yet, the influences of agriculture and urbanisation on the size structure of biotic assemblages have seldom been investigated in running waters. Using a comprehensive dataset...
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Eutrophication is a major problem currently impacting many surface water ecosystems. Impacts of increased nutrient concentrations on biodiversity may differ between different scales, different organism groups, and different trophic states. Surveys at different spatial scales have suggested that biodiversity of different taxa may exhibit significant...
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Full-text available
We evaluated the beta diversity patterns of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages at two spatial scales in streams in the Eastern Amazon, as well as tested whether environmental and spatial factors affected these assemblage patterns differently for non-flying (i.e., shrimps) and flying (i.e., insects ) macroinvertebrate groups. Fifteen streams were...
Article
There have been important advances in understanding the relative importance of environmental and spatial processes for the variation in species composition across a set of local communities linked by dispersal (i.e. metacommunities). However, community composition-environment relationships change over time, and the mechanisms shaping such temporal...
Preprint
Ecological processes occurring at the regional scale, such as the dispersal of organisms, and spatial flows of material and energy are fundamental for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in river networks, yet they remain largely overlooked in most river management practices and underlying policies. We propose a meta-system approach...
Article
Aim To test the importance of evolutionary and biogeographical processes in shaping the assembly of local frog communities in two adjacent regions (hereafter, coastal and inland regions) with different historical signatures. We asked two main questions: (1) why does the coastal region harbour more frog species than the inland region? and (2) how do...
Article
Ecological communities are structured by several mechanisms, including temporal, spatial and environmental factors. However, the simultaneous effects of these factors have rarely been studied. Here, we investigated their role on water beetle assemblages sampled over a period of 18 years. Water beetles were sampled in the spring of each year in loti...
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Metacommunity ecology highlights the importance of integrating simultaneously environmental filtering and spatial processes, such as mass effects and dispersal limitation, into investigation of community assembly. However, few studies to date have tried to examine mass effects and dispersal limitation as independent ecological mechanisms along with...
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There is a growing recognition that examining patterns of ecological communities and their underlying determinants is not only feasible based on taxonomic data, but also functional and phylogenetic approaches. This is because these additional facets can enhance the understanding of the relative contribution of multiple processes in shaping biodiver...
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Patterns of species rarity have long fascinated ecologists, yet most of what we know about the natural world stems from studies of common species. A large proportion of freshwater plant species has small range sizes and are therefore considered rare. However, little is known about the mechanisms and geographical distribution of rarity in the aquati...
Chapter
In the last two decades, community ecology has matured to consider biotic communities as a product of both local and regional processes. Therefore, local communities are currently thought to be connected by the dispersal of organisms, thereby forming a metacommunity. A metacommunity is organized by multiple processes, including environmental filter...
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Aim: Range size conservatism suggests that closely-related species maintain geographic ranges of similar extent. However, consensus regarding this suggestion has not been reached. To shed more light on this phenomenon, we studied freshwater plant range size conservatism, range overlap and environmental niche conservatism using congeneric species co...
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Full-text available
Climate change is a matter of worldwide concern with severe predicted impacts on biodiversity. Here, we analysed the potential impacts of current and future climates on aquatic true bugs (Heteroptera) in relation to their distribution patterns and ecological preferences (based on a database generated from existing literature references and field co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Freshwater biodiversity is declining dramatically, and the current biodiversity crisis requires defining bold goals and mobilizing substantial resources to meet the challenges. While the reasons are varied, both research and conservation of freshwater biodiversity lag far behind efforts in the terrestrial and marine realms. We identify fifteen pres...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the variation in community composition and species abundances, i.e., β-diversity, is at the heart of community ecology. A common approach to examine β-diversity is to evaluate directional turnover in community composition by measuring the decay in the similarity among pairs of communities along spatial or environmental distances. We p...
Article
Broad-scale studies of species distributions and diversity have contributed to the emergence of general macroecological rules. These rules are typically founded on research using well-known terrestrial taxa as models and it is thus uncertain whether aquatic macrophytes follow these macroecological rules. Our purpose is to draw together available in...
Article
Documenting the patterns and potential associated processes of ancient biotas has always been a central challenge in palaeontology. Over recent decades, intense debate has focused on the organization of dinosaur-dominated communities, yet no general consensus has been reached on how these communities were organized in a spatial context. Here, we us...
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Full-text available
Patterns in community composition are scale-dependent and generally difficult to distinguish. Therefore, quantifying the main assembly processes in various systems and across different datasets has remained challenging. Building on the PER-SIMPER method, we propose a new metric, the dispersal-niche continuum index (DNCI), which estimates whether di...
Preprint
Full-text available
Freshwater biodiversity is declining dramatically, and the current biodiversity crisis requires defining bold goals and mobilizing substantial resources to meet the challenges. While the reasons are varied, both research and conservation of freshwater biodiversity lag far behind efforts in the terrestrial and marine realms. We identify fifteen pres...
Article
Full-text available
A recent global meta‐analysis reported a decrease in terrestrial but increase in freshwater insect abundance and biomass (van Klink et al., Science 368, p. 417). The authors suggested that water quality has been improving, thereby challenging recent reports documenting drastic global declines in freshwater biodiversity. We raise two major concerns...
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1. The occupancy and abundance of species are jointly driven by local factors, such as environmental characteristics and biotic interactions, and regional‐scale factors, such as dispersal and climate. Recently, it has been shown that biotic interactions shape species occupancies and abundances beyond local extents. However, for small ectothermic an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Climate change is a matter of worldwide concern with severe predicted impacts on biodiversity. Here, we analysed the potential impacts of current and future climates on aquatic true bugs (Heteroptera) in relation to their distribution patterns and ecological preferences (based on a database generated from existing literature references and field co...
Article
Full-text available
Community ecology has had a strong focus on single snapshots of species compositional variation in time. However, environmental change often occurs slowly at relatively broad spatio-temporal scales, which requires historically explicit assessments of long-term metacommunity dynamics, such as the order of species arrival during community assembly (i...
Article
Aquatic macrophytes increase habitat complexity and influence the structure of fish communities. We investigated relations between macrophyte stand complexity and functional alpha and beta diversity of fish. We sampled fish and plants in 30 macrophyte stands with differences in density and diversity in the Paraná River floodplain. The functional al...
Article
Connectivity plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural and functional attributes of river networks. Therefore, the loss of connectivity (fragmentation) alters the functioning and diversity patterns of the biota at local and regional scales. The global hydropower boom is one of the main drivers of river network fragmentation, with significa...
Article
Aim Evaluating how groups of organisms vary in dispersal capability and how environmental, spatial and temporal signals vary across multiple scales is critical to elucidating metacommunity theory. We examined whether the relative contributions of environmental, spatial and hydrological factors have different effects on organismal groups with differ...
Article
Previous studies have found mixed results regarding the relationship between beta diversity and latitude. In addition, by influencing local environmental heterogeneity, land use may modify spatial taxonomic and functional variability among communities causing biotic differentiation or homogenization. We tested 1) whether taxonomic and functional be...