Janet B Wolforth

Janet B Wolforth
Wayne State University | WSU · Department of Physiology

Associates Applied Science

About

15
Publications
23,271
Reads
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801
Citations
Citations since 2016
2 Research Items
377 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220204060
20162017201820192020202120220204060
20162017201820192020202120220204060
20162017201820192020202120220204060
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Wayne State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Currently acting as Laboratory Manager and mouse surgeon. Placing telemeters, monitoring EMG and EEC.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
The effect of red raspberry fruit (RSP) was assessed in obesity-prone, Zucker Fatty rats as a model of cardiometabolic risk. RSP reduced fasting triglycerides and fasting glucose but did not appear to affect fasting insulin, low-density lipoprotein, or body weight gain. RSP did significantly reduce heart rate relative to time-matched CON rats. Note...
Article
The intake of red raspberry fruit is inversely related to cardiac risk factors and cardiovascular disease. In this study, the effect of red raspberry intake was assessed in obesity-prone, Zucker Fatty rats as a model of cardiometabolic risk. For 8 weeks, rats were fed a higher-fat diet (45% of kcal) containing 2% (wt/wt) freeze-dried whole raspberr...
Article
Full-text available
Anesthetic induction chambers used for medical research are a substantial source of waste anesthetic gas (WAG). Ideally, any generated waste gas should be actively vented away from personnel operating the chamber by either a ventilated hood or snorkel. Unfortunately, the ideal environment for anesthetizing rodents is not always available. In an eff...
Article
Treatment of C57BL/6 mice with cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg) and fludarabine (200 mg/kg) induced nonmyeloablative lymphodepletion without inhibiting D5 melanoma tumor growth. Using this model, we found that induction of lymphopenia before adoptive transfer of ex vivo anti-CD3/CD28 activated and interleukin-2 expanded D5-G6 tumor draining lymph node...
Article
Full-text available
High-fidelity genetically encoded bio-sensors that respond to changes in cellular environmental milieu in disease offer great potential in a range of patho-physiological settings. Here a unique hypoxia-regulated vector-based system with double oxygen-sensing transcriptional elements was developed for rapid and robust hypoxia-regulated gene expressi...
Article
Full-text available
Mice at our institution were hypophysectomized to evaluate the effects of growth hormone on the expression of a transfected human factor IX gene. The hypophysectomy was performed in-house by using a parapharyngeal approach modified from previously published surgical techniques. Modifications included: 1) choice of ketamine-xylazine and isoflurane f...
Article
Radiotelemetry of mouse blood pressure accurately monitors systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, heart rate, and locomotor activity but requires surgical implantation. Noninvasive measurements of indirect systolic blood pressure have long been available for larger rodents and now are being reported more frequently for mice. This study compared mou...
Article
Full-text available
The author outlines various methods of blood collection from mice.

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Veterinarians and technicians often have a difficult time handling cats when veterinary care is needed. Cats have razor sharp teeth and claws. An induction chamber is used when necessary, however; the current practice is not safe for personnel and it’s stressful for animals. Currently; the active, in-house, scavageing system is connected to a 10 or 15 gallon chamber. Gas is administered to the box and is pulled from the box at the same time. The animal goes through a long induction time which is stressful to the animal. Veterinarians are concerned that an animal that is already stressed is stressed even more by the long induction time.
I have available a system that decreases the induction time by diffusing the gas as it is entering the chamber, it’s connected to a passive scavageing, and it actively removes WAG from the chamber before opening.
Some veterinarians still feel using an induction chamber is more stressful than handling the animal and administering an injectable anesthetic drug.
I’m interested in hearing feedback from you on the effects of injectable and inhalation anesthetic drugs on an animal that is already stressed. Which is safer?
Question
Using induction chambers to anesthetize rodents is well known as a leading cause of exposure to hazardous levels of waste anesthetic gas.
Many nose cones also leak waste gas around the animal's nose during surgery.
Stereotactic surgery tables are especially notorious for leaks around the animals nose during surgery. 
I'm interested in hearing different ways waste gas is captured and the general feeling of exposure - do you worry about it? are you aware of the hazards?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The induction chamber evacuation system I have been working on for over a decade now, has gone through many changes this year. Even with changing prototypes, a few systems have been sold; to research and small animal veterinary clinics. Further development of the system will provide for faster induction times for the animals (reducing stress for them) while at the same time making the work environment safer for personnel by efficiently removing waste anesthetic gas that accumulates inside the induction chamber before opening the chamber to remove that animal.