Janek Von Byern

Janek Von Byern
Ludwig Boltzmann Gesellschaft · Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology

PhD

About

56
Publications
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590
Citations

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
Novel medical bioadhesives are proposed to fulfil numerous ideals as being biocompatible, non-toxic, include tissue healing and regeneration characteristics, have high mechanical properties onto different surfaces and other important key features. Mussel-inspired adhesives have provided the basis for many new applications under wet conditions. In c...
Article
Full-text available
The most common European gastropod species, Arion vulgaris , is one of the most troublesome pests for private garden owners and commercial agriculturists. The sticky and hard to remove secretion produced by these animals allows them to overcome most artificial and natural barriers. However, this highly adherent biopolymer has recently shown great p...
Article
Full-text available
The vision of gluing two bone fragments with biodegradable and biocompatible adhesives remains highly fascinating and attractive to orthopedic surgeons. Possibly shorter operation times, better stabilization, lower infection rates, and unnecessary removal make this approach very appealing. After 30 years of research in this field, the first adhesiv...
Chapter
Adhesives are not only being used increasingly in the design of medical devices, but also in the field of application, both directly on and in humans, for example as a replacement for the suturing and stapling of tissue through adhesive bonding. The advantages of using adhesives include less tissue damage, no incorporated materials that require rem...
Article
Full-text available
Animals use adhesive secretions in highly diverse ways, such as for settlement, egg anchorage, mating, active or passive defence, etc. One of the most interesting functions is the use of bioadhesives to capture prey, as the bonding has to be performed within milliseconds and often under unfavourable conditions. While much is understood about the ad...
Article
Full-text available
Cephalopods encapsulate their eggs in protective egg envelopes. To hatch from this enclosure, most cephalopod embryos release egg shell-digesting choriolytic enzymes produced by the Hoyle organ (HO). After hatching, this gland becomes inactive and rapidly degrades by programmed cell death. We aim to characterize morphologically the development, mat...
Chapter
Bioadhesion is a versatile tool used by many organisms for a variety of purposes. It has roles to play in construction, predation, defense, and attachment and covers different concepts based on biochemical and mechanical principles. The specific request on the bond combined with millions of years of evolution results in diverse inspirations for med...
Article
Full-text available
Salamanders have developed a wide variety of antipredator mechanisms, including tail autotomy, colour patterns, and noxious skin secretions. As an addition to these tactics, the red-legged salamander (Plethodon shermani) uses adhesive secretions as part of its defensive strategy. The high bonding strength, the fast-curing nature, and the compositio...
Article
Although gastropods have been crawling through the ocean and on the land for 60 million years, we still know very little about the sticky mucus produced in their foot. Most research has been focused on marine species in particular and, to a lesser extent, on the well-known terrestrial species Arion vulgaris and Cornu aspersum. Within this study, we...
Article
Bio-adhesion is a common and crucial process in nature and is used by several different species for camouflage, prey capture, hatching or to avoid drifting. Four genera of cephalopods belonging to four different families (Euprymna, Sepiolidae; Idiosepius, Idiosepiidae; Nautilus, Nautilidae; and Sepia, Sepiidae) produce glue for temporary attachment...
Article
Full-text available
Die gestielte Meereichel Dosima fascicularis nutzt ein Floß aus einem schaumartigen Proteinhydrogel zum Überleben. Das Gel wäre aufgrund seines Aufbaus und der Zusammensetzung ein idealer Klebstoff für die Medizin.
Article
Apart from their well-known culinary use, gastropod species such as Helix, which have a hydrogel-like mucus, are increasingly being exploited for cosmetic, bioengineering and medical applications. However, not only are the origin and composition of these “sticky” secretions far from being fully characterized, the number and morphology of the mucus...
Article
Salamanders have evolved a wide variety of antipredator mechanisms and behavior patterns, including toxins and noxious or adhesive skin secretions. The high bonding strength of the natural bioadhesives makes these substances interesting for biomimetic research and applications in industrial and medical sectors. Secretions of toxic species may help...
Article
Full-text available
Animals use adhesive secretions in a plethora of ways, either for attachment, egg anchorage , mating or as either active or passive defence. The most interesting function, however, is the use of adhesive threads to capture prey, as the bonding must be performed within milliseconds and under unsuitable conditions (movement of prey, variable environm...
Article
Full-text available
The hatching of an embryo from its egg is a crucial point in its development. This is the moment that decides whether the animal will be able to emerge and survive or whether it will remain trapped and die. Cephalopods usually produce enzymes in a system of glands known as the Hoyle organ, which weakens the chorion and enables hatching. In addition...
Article
Full-text available
Research Cite this article: Jonker J-L, Morrison L, Lynch EP, Grunwald I, von Byern J, Power AM. 2015 The chemistry of stalked barnacle adhesive (Lepas anatifera). Interface Focus 5: The results of the first chemical analysis of the adhesive of Lepas anatifera, a stalked barnacle, are presented. A variety of elements were identified in scanning ele...
Article
Epithelial gland systems play an important role in marine molluscs in fabricating lubricants, repellents, fragrances, adhesives or enzymes. In cephalopods the typically single layered epithelium provides a highly dynamic variability and affords a rapid rebuilding of gland cells. While the digestive hatching gland (also named Hoyle organ) is obligat...
Article
Full-text available
The goose barnacle Dosima fascicularis produces an excessive amount of adhesive (cement), which has a double function, being used for attachment to various substrata and also as a float (buoy). This paper focuses on the chemical composition of the cement, which has a water content of 92%. Scanning electron microscopy with EDX was used to measure th...
Article
Adhesives that are naturally produced by marine organisms are potential sources of inspiration in the search for medical adhesives. Investigations of barnacle adhesives are at an early stage but it is becoming obvious that barnacles utilize a unique adhesive system compared to other marine organisms. The current study examined the fine structure an...
Article
Full-text available
The family Idiosepiidae is an atypical cephalopod group; the member species are the smallest cephalopods in body size, and their phylogenetic position with regard to the other cephalopods as well as the relationships within the genus Idiosepius remain controversial. Cur- rently, 8 recognized species belong to Idiosepius, although the taxonomic posi...
Article
Full-text available
Barnacles produce a proteinaceous adhesive called cement to attach permanently to rocks or to other hard substrata. The stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis is of special interest as it produces a large amount of foam-like cement that can be used as a float. The morphology of the cement apparatus and of the polymerized cement of this species is alm...
Article
Full-text available
Barnacles produce a proteinaceous adhesive called cement to attach permanently to rocks or to other hard substrata. The stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis is of special interest as it produces a large amount of foam-like cement that can be used as a float. The morphology of the cement apparatus and of the polymerized cement of this species is alm...
Article
Full-text available
Nautiloidea is the oldest group within the cephalopoda, and modern Nautilus differs much in its outer morphology from all other recent species; its external shell and pinhole camera eye are the most prominent distinguishing characters. A further unique feature of Nautilus within the cephalopods is the lack of suckers or hooks on the tentacles. Inst...
Article
Full-text available
Water drift and tidal rise make the use of bonding mechanisms beneficial for small benthopelagic or interstitial marine animals. Chemical adhesives for attachment are very common in molluscs; however, only a few cephalopods have glue producing organs. The family Idiosepiidae is characterized by an epithelial adhesive organ (AO) located on the poste...
Article
Adhesion in cephalopods is either mechanical, involving a reduced-pressure system of the arm and tentacle suckers, or is chemically mediated by special adhesive gland structures (as proposed for Euprymna, Idiosepius, and Nautilus). Four species of Sepia (S. typica, S. papillata, S. pulchra, and S. tuberculata) possess grooved structures on the vent...
Article
Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NP) are considered for various applications in the brain. However, little is known so far on the uptake and the metabolism of such nanoparticles in brain cells. Since astrocytes are strategically localized between capillaries and neurons, astrocytes are of particular interest concerning uptake and fate of nanop...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the cephalopod genus Idiosepius Steenstrup, 1881, are currently mainly identi-fied based on the arrangement of suckers on the tentacular club (i.e., in two or four transverse rows) and the number of suckers on the male hectocotylized ventral arms, as stated by Nesis (1982). However, the discovery of a further species, I. thailandicus, ra...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ctenophores are a group of animals found in all the world’s seas, from coastal areas to the deep sea and from the tropics to the poles (Hyman, 1940). They are sometimes called “comb jellies” because they have a jelly-like appearance and distinctive rows of comb plates (ctenes) that are used for locomotion. Most ctenophores are transparent or transl...
Chapter
Full-text available
Barnacles belong to the phylum Crustacea (following the taxonomy of Newman, 1987), which makes them segmented animals with jointed limbs, an exoskeleton that periodically moults, and a complex lifecycle involving metamorphosis between larval and adult forms. The group of crustaceans to which barnacles belong, the Cirripedia, has a unique larval for...
Chapter
Full-text available
Cephalopods are highly evolved invertebrates; since ancient times, they have been admired for their intelligence, their ability to change color within milliseconds and their flexible arms, equipped with suckers or hooks. The suckers are versatile, mainly used to attach mechanically (by a reduced-pressure systems with a low pressure up to 0.01 MPa)...
Article
Full-text available
An adhesive organ is a prominent characteristic of the genus Idiosepius. Histological, histochemical and ultrastructural methods were applied to elucidate the nature of secretion of the epithelial cells of three Idiosepius species. The adhesive organs of Idiosepius biserialis and Idiosepius pygmaeus consist of five distinct cell types that can be d...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Earlier studies by Natsukari (1970) and Yamamoto (1988) provide an overview about the embryonic stages of Idiosepius paradoxus and show that embryos hatch after 18 days (20°C). Current investigations on Idiosepius biserialis from Phuket Island, Thailand indicate that hatching occurs 6 days after oviposition at 28-30°C. Despite the faster embryonic...
Article
Full-text available
Several genera of cephalopods (Nautilus, Sepia, Euprymna and Idiosepius) produce adhesive secretions, which are used for attachment to the substratum, for mating and to capture prey. These adhesive structures are located in different parts of the body, viz. in the digital tentacles (Nautilus), in the ventral surface of the mantle and fourth arm pai...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This report reveals observations about sampling Idiosepius pygmaeus in a selected mangrove area. Idiosepius pygmaeus is shown to inhabit the whole tidal range of a small tributary of the Bangrong River, Phuket Island, Thailand. Males are predominantly located in the upper and lower reaches of the tributary. Females are observed in the lower part an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Histological, histochemical and ultrastructural methods were applied to elucidate the nature of the secretion in the epithelial cells of three Idiosepius species (I. biserialis, I. paradoxus and I. pygmaeus). Previous analysis of the adhesive organ of Euprymna scolopes by Singley (1982) reveals that adhesion and de-adhesion is caused by a duo-gland...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study reveals results on the mechanisms modulating peristalsis of the Vena cephalica in Sepia officinalis (L.) (Cephalopoda). The pharmacological data provide evidence for two antagonistic receptor systems in the Vena cephalica. Cholinergic transmitters, like acetylcholine and nicotine, have a positive effect on peristalsis of the Vena cephali...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New records of Idiosepius biserialis in Indonesia and Japan indicate that this species has a wider distribution than supposed before. Its occurrence in "cooler" Japanese waters (15-20 °C) waters next to the related species Idiosepius paradoxus indicates that the distribution of Idiosepius biserialis is not limited to tropical waters (25-30 °C).

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Examination of biological light emissions
Project
COST Action CA15216 European Network of Bioadhesion Expertise: Fundamental Knowledge to Inspire Advanced Bonding Technologies http://www.cost.eu/COST_Actions/ca/CA15216