Janeen Loehr

Janeen Loehr
University of Saskatchewan | U of S · Department of Psychology

About

26
Publications
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645
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Ensemble music performance requires musicians to achieve precise interpersonal coordination while maintaining autonomous control over their own actions. To do so, musicians dynamically shift between integrating other performers’ actions into their own action plans and maintaining a distinction between their own and others’ actions. Research in labo...
Article
When people perform joint actions together, their individual actions (e.g., moving one end of a heavy couch) must be coordinated to achieve a collective goal (e.g., moving the couch across the room). Joint actions pose unique challenges for understanding people's sense of agency, because each person engaged in the joint action can have a sense of a...
Article
Successful human interaction relies on people's ability to differentiate between the sensory consequences of their own and others' actions. Research in solo action contexts has identified sensory attenuation, that is, the selective perceptual or neural dampening of the sensory consequences of self-produced actions, as a potential marker of the dist...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen a rapid increase in research investigating the motor-related brain activity that supports joint action. This research has employed a variety of joint action tasks and an array of neuroimaging techniques, including fMRI, fNIRS, EEG, and TMS. In this review, we provide an overview of this research to delineate what is known abo...
Article
When people coordinate their actions with others, they experience a sense of joint agency, i.e., shared control over actions and their consequences. The current study examined whether the predictability of others’ actions modulates joint agency. Each participant coordinated with two confederate partners to produce tone sequences that matched a metr...
Article
Philosophers have proposed that when people coordinate their actions with others they may experience a sense of joint agency, or shared control over actions and their effects. However, little empirical work has investigated the sense of joint agency. In the current study, pairs coordinated their actions to produce tone sequences and then rated thei...
Article
Full-text available
People often coordinate their actions with others' in pursuit of shared goals, yet little research has examined the neural processes by which people monitor whether shared goals have been achieved. The current study compared event-related potentials elicited by feedback indicating joint errors (resulting from two people's coordinated actions) and i...
Article
People performing joint actions coordinate their individual actions with each other to achieve a shared goal. The current study investigated the mental representations that are formed when people learn a new skill as part of a joint action. In a musical transfer-of-learning paradigm, piano novices first learned to perform simple melodies in the joi...
Article
Full-text available
Successful joint action often requires people to distinguish between their own and others' contributions to a shared goal. One mechanism that is thought to underlie a self-other distinction is sensory attenuation, whereby the sensory consequences of one's own actions are reduced compared to other sensory events. Previous research has shown that the...
Article
We investigated whether people monitor the outcomes of their own and their partners' individual actions as well as the outcome of their combined actions when performing joint actions together. Pairs of pianists memorized both parts of a piano duet. Each pianist then performed one part while their partner performed the other; EEG was recorded from b...
Chapter
This chapter focuses on examining the concept of joint action, which involves coordinated representation of perception–action processes. Investigations reveal that intimate relationships between perception and action result in coordination between two individuals who process the same perpetual or motor information that drives them to imitate each o...
Chapter
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We report a study of temporal coordination among performing musicians in solo and duet piano performance. Each pianist performed the same two-part piano music in a solo condition (one pianist, two hands) and in a duet condition (two pianists, two hands). The structure of the left-hand part was designed to be either relatively simple or complex in i...
Article
Full-text available
Many common behaviours require people to coordinate the timing of their actions with the timing of others' actions. We examined whether representations of musicians' actions are activated in coperformers with whom they must coordinate their actions in time and whether coperformers simulate each other's actions using their own motor systems during t...
Article
Full-text available
People often coordinate their actions with sequences that exhibit temporal variability and unfold at multiple periodicities. We compared oscillator- and timekeeper-based accounts of temporal coordination by examining musicians' coordination of rhythmic musical sequences with a metronome that gradually changed rate at the end of a musical phrase (Ex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigated correspondences between listeners' emotional re- sponses to an orchestral work and the underlying phrase structure. An algorithm for the automatic detection of musical phrase boundaries was developed, based on listeners' continuous ratings of perceived emotion with a two-dimensional tool (valence and arousal). Rates of chang...
Article
Full-text available
SENSORY INFORMATION AVAILABLE WHEN MUSICIANS' fingers arrive on instrument keys contributes to temporal accuracy in piano performance (Goebl & Palmer, 2008). The hypothesis that timing accuracy is related to sensory (tactile) information available at finger-key contact was extended to clarinetists' finger movements during key depressions and releas...
Article
Full-text available
THE CURRENT STUDY EXAMINED HOW AUDITORY AND kinematic information influenced pianists' ability to synchronize musical sequences with a metronome. Pianists performed melodies in which quarter-note beats were subdivided by intervening eighth notes that resulted from auditory information (heard tones), motor production (produced tones), both, or neith...
Article
Full-text available
The authors examined how timing accuracy in tapping sequences is influenced by sequential effects of preceding finger movements and biomechanical interdependencies among fingers. Skilled pianists tapped sequences at 3 rates; in each sequence, a finger whose motion was more or less independent of other fingers' motion was preceded by a finger to whi...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effect of expressive intent on timing and movement in clarinet performance. Clarinetists' performances were recorded with mo- tion capture while they performed with three expressive intents: expres- sive (normal) performance, exaggerated performance, and inexpressive performance. Acoustic measures (intensity, pitch height, duration)...
Article
Full-text available
Movement sequences such as typing or tapping display important interactions among finger movements arising from anticipatory motion (preparing for upcoming events) and coupling (non-independence among fingers). We examined pianists' finger tapping for the influence of cognitive chunking processes and biomechanical coupling constraints. In a synchro...
Article
Full-text available
Skilled musicians are capable of fast, fluent performance of complex musical sequences whose motor demands can shape sequential aspects of performance, similar to principles of coarticulation in speech. We address how performers' motor systems can influence the ways in which melodies are performed, both in motion and sound. In contrast to energy co...
Article
Participants who witness an event and later receive post-event information that omits a critical scene are less likely to recall and to recognise that scene than are participants who receive no post-event information (Wright, Loftus, & Hall, 2001). The present study used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, in which participants study lists...
Article
Directed forgetting may reduce DRM false memory illusion by interfering with meaning processing. Participants were presented with a list composed of six 10-word semantically associated sub-lists, and they were either (a) asked to remember all list items of (b) asked to remember all associates from sub-lists and to forget all associates from other s...
Article
Full-text available
Research on the modularity of perceptual and cognitive processes has often pointed to a ventral-dorsal distinction in cortical pathways that depend upon the nature of the stimuli and the task. However, it is not clear whether the dorsal, occipital-parietal stream specializes in locating visual objects (i.e., a "where" stream), or taking action towa...
Article
This thesis investigates temporal coordination in music performance. Previous investigations of temporal coordination have focused on people's coordination of simple movements with experimenter-controlled stimulus sequences or with other people performing similar movements. The research presented here focuses instead on coordination of the rhythmic...

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