Jane E. Williamson

Jane E. Williamson
Macquarie University · Department of Biological Sciences

Ph.D.

About

128
Publications
37,504
Reads
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3,647
Citations
Citations since 2016
70 Research Items
2100 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - December 2012
Macquarie University
January 1994 - present

Publications

Publications (128)
Article
Full-text available
Molecular techniques were employed to investigate genetic structure and diversity in dusky Carcharhinus obscurus and sandbar C. plumbeus sharks in the Indo-Australian region. Tissue samples of 423 C. obscurus and 442 C. plumbeus defined 18 and 11 mtDNA ND4 haplo- types, respectively. For C. obscurus, weak genetic differentiation was detected betwee...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing interest in how facilitation cascades-nested positive indirect interactions involving at least 3 species-maintain community structure. Here we investigated whether the positive relationship between the kelp Ecklonia radiata and the gastropod Phasianotrochus eximius is mediated by a third species, the sea urchin Holopneustes purp...
Article
Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are resulting in increasing absorption of CO2 by the earth‘s oceans, which has led to a decline in ocean pH, a process known as ocean acidification (OA). Evidence suggests that OA may have the potential to affect the distribution and population dynamics of many marine organisms. Early life history proces...
Article
Full-text available
Signals in intraspecific communication should be inherently honest; otherwise the system is prone to collapse. Theory predicts, however, that honest signalling systems are susceptible to invasion by cheats, the extent of which is largely mediated by fear of reprisal. Cuttlefish facultatively change their shape and colour, an ability that evolved to...
Article
Examination of the spawning and maturity traits of coexisting Platycephalus caeruleopunctatus, P. grandispinis and P. richardsoni (Pisces: Platycephalidae) in coastal waters of southeastern Australia identified many commonalities. Each species was gonochoristic, reproductively active for a prolonged period each year, displayed asynchronous oocyte d...
Article
Full-text available
The impacts of climate change are expected to have profound effects on the fisheries of the Pacific Ocean, including its tuna fisheries, the largest globally. This study examined the combined effects of climate change on the yellowfin tuna population using the ecosystem model SEAPODYM. Yellowfin tuna fisheries in the Pacific contribute significantl...
Article
Patterns of mother‐embryo fractionation of 13C and 15N were assessed for their predictability across three species of batoids caught as bycatch in south‐eastern Australia. Stable isotope analysis of 24 mothers and their litters revealed that isotope ratios of embryos were significantly different from their corresponding mothers, and that the scale...
Article
The endangered soft coral Dendronephthya australis faces substantial population decreases in central eastern Australian waters. Despite uncertainty about the cause of these declines, the population genetics of the species has not been investigated. Genetic analysis suggests that D. australis is a single species within the family Nephtheidae, confir...
Article
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Understanding the unique feeding behaviours of oceanic fish, such as marlin, is key to their effective management. Marlin are notoriously difficult to study, however, and the limited research on marlin feeding shows that diet can vary greatly between species and geographic regions. One region where marlin feeding behaviours are particularly poorly...
Article
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Australian cownose rays (Rhinoptera neglecta) and whitespotted eagle rays (Aetobatus ocellatus) are large myliobatiform rays that co‐occur off temperate eastern Australia. Here, we performed stable‐isotope analyses (δ13C, δ15N and δ34S) on fin clips of both species to gain insights into their trophic interactions and isotopic niches and assess the...
Article
Full-text available
Bluelined goatfish ( Upeneichthys lineatus ) exhibit dynamic body colour changes and transform rapidly from a pale, buff/white, horizontally banded pattern to a conspicuous, vertically striped, red pattern when foraging. This red pattern is potentially an important foraging signal for communication with conspecifics, provided that U. lineatus can d...
Article
The reproductive characteristics of co-occurring freespine flathead, Ratabulus diversidens , and mud flathead, Ambiserrula jugosa , that interact with fisheries across continental shelf waters of eastern Australia were examined. Samples were collected across three depth strata and two locations on a monthly basis over two years. Males of both speci...
Article
Full-text available
In the waters of southeast Australia, two species of sawshark—the common (Pristiophorus cirratus) and southern (Pristiophorus nudipinnis) sawshark—are frequent by-catch in commercial fisheries. While harvesting of both species is currently considered sustainable, there has been no investigation of whether P. cirratus and P. nudipinnis display genet...
Article
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Biological invasions are among the biggest threats to freshwater biodiversity. This is increasingly relevant in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, particularly since the introduction of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio). This invasive species now occupies up to 90% of fish biomass, with hugely detrimental impacts on native fauna and flora. To add...
Article
Full-text available
Bioturbation of reef sediments aerates the upper sediment layers and releases organic material to benthic communities. Despite being the larger and more conspicuous bioturbators on coral reefs, the value of holothurians (sea cucumbers) to reef ecosystems is less often attributed to their ecosystem services than their value for fisheries. This may b...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological invasions are among the biggest threats to freshwater biodiversity. This is increasingly relevant in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia, particularly since the introduction of the common carp ( Cyprinus carpio ). This invasive species now occupies up to 90% of fish biomass, with hugely detrimental impacts on native fauna and flora. To a...
Article
Full-text available
Revealing the determinants of virome composition is central to placing disease emergence in a broader evolutionary context. Fish are the most species-rich group of vertebrates and so provide an ideal model system to study the factors that shape virome compositions and their evolution. We characterised the viromes of 19 wild-caught species of marine...
Article
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Prey manipulation through headfirst ingestion is a common foraging tactic in predatory taxa. Sawsharks possesses a toothed rostrum that is thought to assist in prey capture, but the process from prey contact to ingestion is unknown. Here we provide evidence of headfirst ingestion and possible prey orientation in situ through the use of cone beam CT...
Article
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The way an animal behaves in its habitat provides insight into its ecological role. As such, collecting robust, accurate datasets in a time-efficient manner is an ever-present pressure for the field of behavioural ecology. Faced with the shortcomings and physical limitations of traditional ground-based data collection techniques, particularly in ma...
Article
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Marine invertebrates are promising sources of novel bioactive secondary metabolites, and organisms like sponges, ascidians and nudibranchs are characterised by possessing potent defensive chemicals. Animals that possess chemical defences often advertise this fact with aposematic colouration that potential predators learn to avoid. One seemingly def...
Article
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Over the past decade, drones have become a popular tool for wildlife management and research. Drones have shown significant value for animals that were often difficult or dangerous to study using traditional survey methods. In the past five years drone technology has become commonplace for shark research with their use above, and more recently, bel...
Article
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Coastal ecosystems are under threat from a range of anthropogenic impacts that disrupt habitat connectivity and the ability for animals to move within them. Understanding fine-scale animal movement provides insight into how animals are responding to these pressures, and underpins effective ecological management and conservation strategies. This stu...
Article
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Determining the geographic range of widely dispersed or migratory marine organisms is notoriously difficult, often requiring considerable costs and typically extensive tagging or exploration programs. While these approaches are accurate and can reveal important information on the species, they are usually conducted on only a small number of individ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Understanding movement patterns of a species is vital for optimising conservation and management strategies. This information is often difficult to obtain in the marine realm for species that regularly occur at depth. The common sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) is a small, benthic-associated elasmobranch species that occurs from shallow...
Article
Full-text available
Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) has caused mass mortalities in farmed and wild tilapia with serious economic and ecological consequences. Until recently, this virus was the sole member of the Amnoonviridae, a family within the order Articulavirales comprising segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. We sought to identify additional viruses within the Amnoon...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) has caused mass mortalities in farmed and wild tilapia with serious economic and ecological consequences. Until recently, this virus was the sole member of the Amnoonviridae , a family within the order Articulavirales comprising segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. We sought to identify additional viruses within the Amnoo...
Article
Sawsharks (Order: Pristiophoriformes, Family: Pristiophoridae) are a highly distinctive group of sharks, characterized by a tapering saw‐like rostrum with a pair of elongate barbels on the ventral surface. Their unusual characteristics should attract attention; however, very few studies have been dedicated to sawsharks. As a result, our understandi...
Article
Populations of sharks are declining globally, largely due to fishing pressure. There is a lack of fisheries-independent data on the demographics of many species, particularly those inhabiting deeper waters. The common sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) is a benthic-associated shark endemic to southeastern Australia that has been fished for over 90 y...
Article
Resource partitioning facilitates the coexistence of sympatric species through spatial, temporal, and/or trophic strategies. Fishes living in the intertidal zone demonstrate highly adaptive plastic behaviour, including resource partitioning, through spatial and temporal shifts in diet and micro‐habitat. Although intertidal fish assemblages are infl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Understanding movement patterns of a species is vital for optimising conservation and management strategies. This information is often difficult to obtain in the marine realm for species that regularly occur at depth. The common sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) is a small, benthic associated elasmobranch species that occurs from shallow...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Understanding movement patterns of a species is vital for optimising conservation and management strategies. This information is often difficult to obtain in the marine realm for species that regularly occur at depth. The common sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) is a small, benthic associated elasmobranch species that occurs from shallow...
Preprint
Full-text available
Identifying the components of host ecology that promote virus diversity is crucial for our understanding of the drivers of virus evolution and disease emergence. As the most species rich group of vertebrates that exhibit diverse ecologies, fish provide an ideal model system to study the impacts of host ecology on the composition of their viromes. T...
Article
Sawsharks are one of the least well-known groups of sharks globally, yet they are caught in large numbers in south-eastern Australia. In this study we assessed spatiotemporal patterns of distribution of two co-occurring species of sawsharks, namely the common sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) and the southern sawshark (Pristiophorus nudipinnis), to...
Article
Full-text available
Capabilities of remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) have increased substantially in the last decade, and mini-ROV designs are now able to conduct visual research frequently conducted by snorkellers or divers in shallow marine environments. There are logistical, financial and experimental benefits of using mini-ROVs over snorkellers or divers, yet the...
Article
Restricted gene flow and reproductive philopatry are increasingly being described in marine predators such as sharks. However, observing shark reproductive behaviour in situ is problematic because of issues associated with sampling in the marine environment. As such, molecular tools have become fundamental to unravelling complex mating behaviours....
Article
Full-text available
We present the complete mitochondrial genome of the Epaulette Shark Hemiscyllium ocellatum, sequenced with 24 primer sets. The 16,728 bp long circular genome consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a non-coding control region. Several protein-coding genes ended with incomplete stop codons (TA- or T–). Phylogenetic ana...
Article
Measures of biodiversity are often hindered by a lack of methodological practices that distinguish cryptic or morphologically similar cohabiting species. This is particularly difficult for marine fishes where direct observations of the ecology and demography of populations are difficult. Dragonets (Foetorepus c.f. calauropomus) were collected as by...
Article
Elasmobranchs make a large contribution to bycatch in commercial trawl fisheries, which reduces the efficiency (and thus profitability of those fisheries), results in injury and mortality of those elasmobranchs, and can lead to unsustainable rates of catches. The development of bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) for elasmobranchs has been hindered, a...
Article
While post-release mortality estimates have been conducted on a range of shark species, the short-term sub-lethal effects of capture, handling and release are poorly known and have been mostly investigated in controlled conditions. In addition, the widely accepted notion that immediate post-release active swimming is an indicator of shark condition...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the small-scale movement patterns of marine vertebrates usually requires invasive active acoustic tagging or in-water monitoring, with the inherent behavioural impacts of those techniques. In addition, these techniques rarely allow direct continuous behavioural assessments or the recording of environmental interactions, especially for h...
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture is the fastest growing industry worldwide. Aquatic diseases have had enormous economic and environmental impacts in the recent past and the emergence of new aquatic pathogens, particularly viruses, poses a continuous threat. Nevertheless, little is known about the diversity, abundance and evolution of fish viruses. We used a meta-transc...
Article
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Establishing behavioural repeatability is important in animal personality research; however, a range of factors can influence repeatability. Experimental design, particularly acclimation time, is important in managing a subject’s stress prior to the onset of behavioural observations. Acclimatisation also ensures we capture “normal” behaviour and pr...
Article
Hydroides is a large and diverse group of calcareous tubeworms (Serpulidae, Annelida) recognised by a distinctive but variable two-tiered operculum. Despite considerable research using several species of Hydroides as models in ecological and biofouling studies, phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within the genus are still poorly understoo...
Article
Relationships between fish and otolith measurements were analyzed in nine demersal fishes from the north-eastern Tasmanian waters: Foetorepus calauropomus, Trachurus declivis, Parequula melbournensis, Neosebastes scorpaenoides, Platycephalus aurimaculatus, Platycephalus bassensis, Platycephalus conatus, Lepidotrigla mulhalli and Lepidotrigla vaness...
Article
Full-text available
The development of shark vertebrae and the possible drivers of inter- and intra-specific differences in vertebral structure are poorly understood. Shark vertebrae are used to examine life-history traits related to trophic ecology, movement patterns, and the management of fisheries; a better understanding of their development would be beneficial to...
Data
Raw data of signal detections for linear sections across all vertebrae examined in this study. The data also includes other elements that were detectable, but not necessarily detected in significant amounts. (XLSX)
Article
Full-text available
Body size is an important feature of how species interact with their environment, and can influence predation risk, requirements and type of diet consumed, habitat suitability, and susceptibility to environmental pressures. Echinoderms, such as sea urchins, often inhabit areas subjected to wave disturbance and tidal flow, and are able to withstand...
Article
Potential roles of the rostrum of sawsharks (Pristiophoridae), including predation and self-defence, were assessed through a variety of inferential methods. Comparison of microwear on the surface of the rostral teeth of sawsharks and sawfishes (Pristidae) show that microwear patterns are alike and suggest that the elongate rostra in these two elasm...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Bivalve shells are nanocomposite materials, consisting of a wide variety of ultrastructure types of hierarchically structured units of calcium carbonate crystals embedded within an organic scaffold. Although increasingly important as paleoclimate proxy archives, the exact sub-micrometre growth dynamics and the influence of metabolism on bivalve she...
Article
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The Port Jackson Shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) is an epibenthic, oviparous species endemic to the southern half of Australia. Understanding the genetic structure, ecology and reproductive behaviours of this species is essential for developing appropriate management and conservation strategies. However, research has been hampered due a lack of...
Article
Full-text available
Recent efforts to monitor the health of coral reefs have highlighted the benefits of using structure from motion-based assessments, and despite increasing use of this technique in ecology and geomorphology, no study has attempted to quantify the precision of this technique over time and across different observers. This study determined whether 3D m...
Article
Full-text available
Dietary niches can support the coexistence of closely related sympatric species in marine systems, which can lead to the presence of greater abundances of those species that can potentially support their fisheries or greater abundances for other fish species that prey upon those species. Dietary relationships for three species of gurnard (Family Tr...
Article
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The spatial learning skills of high and low stress juvenile mulloway ( Argyrosomus japonicus ) were tested in a dichotomous choice apparatus. Groups of fish were formed based on background blood cortisol levels and required to learn the location of a food reward hidden in one of two compartments. Low stress fish characterised by low background leve...
Chapter
Full-text available
There is an increasing interest in how nested positive indirect interactions involving at least three species maintain community structure. Recent research shows that positive indirect effects can strongly influence community structure, organisation and functioning. It is thus important to understand and identify positive indirect effects for the p...
Article
The internal anatomy of the barbels of the common sawshark Pristiophorus cirratus was examined with light microscopy to clarify their sensory role. No sensory structures such as taste buds (chemoreception), ampullae of Lorenzini (electroreception) or free neuromasts (lateral line mechanoreception) could be located in the barbels. The presence of bu...
Article
Dietary habits and intra- and inter-specific trophic ecology of co-occurring Lepidotrigla mulhalli and L. vanessa from south-eastern Australia were analysed using stomach content and stable isotope ratios (δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N). Both species are bottom-feeding carnivores that consumed mainly benthic crustaceans, but teleosts were also abundant in the diet...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics are ubiquitous in the marine environment. Their small size makes them bioavailable to a range of organisms and studies have reported ingestion across the food chain. Few studies have demonstrated physical transfer of microplastics between organisms, and no research has assessed the ecological impacts of transferred microplastics and c...
Article
Full-text available
Clarifying taxonomic status is essential to understanding invasion source and the spread of invasive species. Here we used barcoding gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I to explore the issue in a common fouling invasive species Hydroides dianthus. The species was originally described from off New England, USA, reported along the east coast of North...