Jane Victoria Simmonds

Jane Victoria Simmonds
University College London | UCL · Institute of Child Health

DProf, MA, PGCHE, BAppSc(Physio), BPE

About

32
Publications
5,196
Reads
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753
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - present
Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth
Position
  • Physiotherapy Hypermobility Lead
Description
  • Specialising in hypermobility, Ehlers Danlos, PoTS, sports and performing arts injuries

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
Children with symptomatic joint hypermobility (SJH) report chronic pain, fatigue, and joint instability as their main symptoms. Symptoms can extend beyond musculoskeletal and include lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). There are no studies exploring parent‐perceived quality of life (QoL) in children with LUTD, or strategies used to manage sympt...
Article
Introduction Hypermobile joints display a range of movement that is considered excessive, taking into consideration the age, gender and ethnic background of the individual. Joint hypermobility may present in a single joint, a few joints or in multiple joints and may be congenital or acquired with training, disease or injury. Hypermobile joints may...
Article
Purpose: To explore exercise beliefs and behaviours of individuals with Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers–Danlos syndrome – hypermobility type and to explore patient experiences of physiotherapy. Methods: A cross sectional questionnaire survey design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data from adult members of the Hypermobility Syn...
Article
New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in management of individuals with hypermobility related disorde...
Article
Background: Physiotherapists play a fundamental role in managing adults with hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome (HMS). Access to training and its influence on the physiotherapy treatment of hypermobile adults is unknown. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to: i) Explore UK physiotherapists' knowledge of hypermobility and HMS in adults....
Article
OBJECTIVE: To develop an understanding of patient and health professional views and experiences of physiotherapy to manage joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). DESIGN: An explorative qualitative design. Seven focus groups were convened, audio recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method to inductively derive a themati...
Conference Paper
Introduction Manual therapies have been advocated for the management of tendinopathy.Purpose of the studyTo systematically review the literature to determine the efficacy of the use manual therapies in the management of tendinopathy.Methods The review followed a 2 phase process. Phase 1 involved a systematic scoping search of the literature to dete...
Article
Background. Musculosk eletal problems are common reasons for seeking primary health care. It has been suggested that many people with ‘everyday’ non-inflammatory musculoskeletal problems may have undiagnosed joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), a complex multi-systemic condition. JHS is characterized by joint laxity, pain, fatigue and a wide range o...
Article
BACKGROUND: Physiotherapists play a fundamental role in managing adults with hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome (HMS). Access to training and its influence on the physiotherapy treatment of hypermobile adults is unknown. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to: i) Explore UK physiotherapists' knowledge of hypermobility and HMS in adults....
Article
BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal problems are common reasons for seeking primary health care. It has been suggested that many people with ‘everyday’ non-inflammatory musculoskeletal problems may have undiagnosed joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS), a complex multi-systemic condition. JHS is characterised by joint laxity, pain, fatigue and a wide range of...
Article
Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, t...
Article
Introduction Manual therapies have been advocated for the management of tendinopathy. Purpose of the study To systematically review the literature to determine the efficacy of the use manual therapies in the management of tendinopathy. Methods The review followed a 2 phase process. Phase 1 involved a systematic scoping search of the literature to d...
Article
Objectives To ascertain the prevalence of General Joint Hypermobility (GJH) and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) in elite level netballers. To investigate whether GJH influences functional movement control and explore whether symptoms of dysautonomia are reported in this population. Design Observational within-subject cross-sectional design. Se...
Article
BACKGROUND: Generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) is common in the general population and may not confer any adverse symptoms. Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) is a connective tissue disorder that often runs in families and may present with a complex array of signs and symptoms. JHS is under-recognised and often poorly managed by the medical and...
Article
Full-text available
OBJECTIVES: To explore knowledge and perceptions of Joint Hypermobility (JHM) and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) amongst paediatric physiotherapists and to determine training needs. DESIGN: National online survey. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: UK paediatric physiotherapists were surveyed through the interactive website of the Chartered Society of P...
Article
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is an inherited disorder of connective tissue. It presents as a condition in which there are neuromusculoskeletal signs and symptoms, including pain, without the inflammatory component of a joint disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. Re-attendance in rheumatology clinics, re-injury and prolonged rehabilitation are...
Article
Hypermobility and hypermobility syndrome are common conditions with universal interest. However, despite significant advances in our knowledge of the presentation and implications of lax tissues there is still much to learn about the best way to manage the symptoms. This review discusses our current knowledge on the management of joint problems ass...
Article
Full-text available
To determine if joint hypermobility is a risk factor for injury in a professional football squad. Primary objectives were to estimate the prevalence of hypermobility amongst a professional football squad and to undertake an audit of injuries sustained over a season. Secondary objectives were to relate the injury audit findings and hypermobility lev...
Article
Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is a largely under-recognised and poorly understood multi-systemic hereditary connective tissue disorder which manifests in a variety of different clinical presentations. The assessment and management of patients with the syndrome is often complicated, requiring a comprehensive patient-centred approach and co-ordi...
Article
Objectives: To assess the knowledge and health beliefs, on osteoporosis, of 16-18 year olds in full-time education in the UK. This is believed to be an age where peak bone mass, a significant factor in osteoporosis and fracture risk, can be influenced. Knowledge and health beliefs may affect whether preventative behaviours are practised. Design: Co...
Article
Hypermobile joints by definition display a range of movement that is considered excessive, taking into consideration the age, gender and ethnic background of the individual. Joint hypermobility, when associated with symptoms is termed the joint hypermobility syndrome or hypermobility syndrome (JHS). JHS is an under recognised and poorly managed mul...