Jane A Lawson

Jane A Lawson
Emory University/University of Sheffield

MDiv, MLn, FSA FRHistS

About

37
Publications
2,190
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15
Citations
Introduction
Publications include New Year’s gift exchanges, Elizabeth Court, Elizabeth’s wardrobe colors, books and patronage given and received between the Queen and her court, and Elizabeth’s Privy Chamber personnel, including Bess of Hardwick, Giovanni Battista Castiglione (ODNB forthcoming), Catherine Carey Knollys, and Lady Mary Cheke (ODNB). Current projects include the Household Ordinance Book of Mary I, Maids of Honor and Court Culture.
Education
September 1977 - May 1979
Emory University
Field of study
  • Library Science
September 1974 - May 1977
September 1970 - May 1974
Palm Beach Atlantic University
Field of study
  • Religion/Spanish

Publications

Publications (37)
Book
The records of Queen Elizabeth's New Year's gift exchanges convey a wealth of information about the late Tudor court. Records of twenty-four exchanges survive from the forty-five years of Elizabeth's reign, naming more than 1,200 participants. The vellum rolls record what was given to the Queen and what she gave in return. The gift rolls convey imp...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In March 1549 Princess Elizabeth wrote to Edward Seymour Lord Protector concerning one of her close attendants, Catherine Astley. *‘She hath been with me a long time and many years, and hath taken great labor and pain in bringing me up in learning and honesty, and therefore I ought of very duty speak for her, for Saint Gregory sayeth we are more bo...
Data
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Conference Paper
Full-text available
Matching titles with individuals who held the titles often presents researchers with difficult problems: Who was the Chief Justice in 1577? Who was Lord Hunsdon in 1597? Contemporary documents tend to identify persons by their titles alone. Arthur Kinney’s Titled Elizabethans (1973) solved many such problems for the period of 1558-1603 by listing t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Women and men who entered court service with Queen Elizabeth remained in the post for many years. Elizabeth was remarkably loyal to those who served her and maintained close relationships with these individuals. One of these courtiers, Lady Mary Cheke, participated in every extant gift exchange of Elizabeth’s reign, as well as at least one of Edwar...
Article
Full-text available
In August 1561 Lady Catherine Grey needed someone to confide in about her secret marriage to Edward Seymour Earl of Hertford and her subsequent pregnancy. Her closest friend and Edward’s sister, Jane Seymour, had died in March of that year, so Catherine turned to another former maid of honor and current Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber. This gentle...
Conference Paper
In August 1561 Lady Catherine Grey needed someone to confide in about her secret marriage to Edward Seymour Earl of Hertford and her subsequent pregnancy. Her closest friend and Edward’s sister, Jane Seymour, had died in March of that year, so Catherine turned to another former maid of honor and current Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber. This gentle...
Conference Paper
Courtiers anticipated the annual New Year’s Gift Exchange, planning what gift from them would please the Queen. While the gift of choice for many peers was coinage in a purse, others sought her pleasure with embellished jewels and embroidered gowns. The diversity of gifts increased down the social scale, from knights to gentlewomen to the Queen’s n...
Chapter
In the following list, peerages are English unless designated by (I) for Irish or (S) for Scottish. The dignities rank in the following order of ascendancy: Baron/Baroness, Viscount/Viscountess, Earl/Countess, Marquess/Lady Marquess, Duke/Duchess. For other creations of the dignity, please refer to Cokayne Complete Peerage, A widowed peeress contin...
Chapter
Senior law officer who defended the interests of the Crown, occasionally summoned to the Houses of Parliament to expound on legal policy.
Chapter
Four in number, two always on duty to watch by day and by night, appointed for life. They performed the Office of ‘All Night’, slept in the Presence Chamber, and held supreme jurisdiction in the Privy Chamber until morning, outranking even the Lord Chamberlain or Lord Steward during these hours.
Chapter
Canterbury The Province of Canterbury includes Bath and Wells, Bristol, Chichester, Ely, Exeter, Gloucester, Hereford, Lichfield and Coventry, Lincoln, Norwich, Oxford, Peterborough, Rochester, Salisbury, Winchester, and Worcester.
Chapter
Highest state office; presided over House of Lords, acted as Queen’s representative to Parliament, and directed the judiciary. Custodian of the Great Seal of state affixed to proclamations, writs, letters patent, and documents giving power to sign and ratify treaties; under Elizabeth I, the titles of Lord Chancellor and Lord Keeper were alternate t...
Chapter
The titles of Lord Lieutenant and Lord Deputy were the titles given to governors of Ireland who were appointed by the Crown.
Chapter
The Order of the Garter was founded by Edward III, probably in 1348. The Order consisted of the sovereign and twenty-four elected Knights Companions, who were only replaced upon death or disgrace. Vacancies were filled at the annual chapter meeting, St. George’s Day, 23 Apr. Knights were elected on the third day of the Garter ceremonies. The Queen...
Chapter
The Officers of Arms, comprised of three Kings of Arms (senior heralds), six Heralds, and four Pursuivants (junior heralds), has authority in all matters of heraldry, the granting of coats of arms, generalogical research, and the recording of pedigrees. They are appointed by the Queen, after being nominated by the Earl Marshal who is in overal char...
Chapter
There were many special ambassadors and extraordinary ambassadors to these and to other countries.
Chapter
The Royal Household was divided into three ‘Departments’. The Lord Chamberlain was concerned with administration of affairs ‘above stairs’—the Queen’s private accom-modations, wardrobe, travel, reception of guests, and entertainments; the Lord Steward was in charge of activities ‘below stairs’—food, drink, light, and fuel; the Master of the Horse w...
Conference Paper
Panel Organizer - The records of the Renaissance New Year’s gift exchanges convey a wealth of information about the late Tudor and early Stuart courts. Records of twenty-four exchanges survive from the forty-five years of Elizabeth’s reign, naming more than 1,200 participants. The vellum rolls record what was given to the Queen and what she gave in...
Conference Paper
Elizabethan courtiers knew that the gift of a jewel to Elizabeth was a worthy presentation to the Queen. The New Year’s gift exchanges record descriptions of jewels given along with the giver and the royal custodian of the gift. These jewel descriptions hint that the gift could be a vehicle for expressing a symbolic view of the Queen or for deliver...
Conference Paper
The maids of honor were sworn crown servants, who served both Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary as well as the consort queens of the Tudor and Stuart kings. During the reign of Elizabeth, more than fifty young women held this post. Because there were never more than six maids of honor at any one time, usually serving a term of three to five years, thi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper evaluates the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth I on the basis of the colours that she wore. The author takes an often quoted comment, that Elizabeth I stated 'these are my colours' of black and white, and using evidence collected from the New Year's gift rolls provides details of over thirty different colours worn by the queen. The article ex...