Jane Gilmour

Jane Gilmour
University College London | UCL · Institute of Child Health

About

24
Publications
2,523
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867
Citations
Citations since 2017
3 Research Items
232 Citations
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Introduction
Jane Gilmour currently works at the Institute of Child Health, University College London, specializing in Neuropsychology, and Developmental Psychology. Her most recent publication is 'Paediatric Neuropsychological Assessment: Frameworks for Clinical Training and Practice'.

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Rationale: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a three-hour psychoeducation group in improving understanding of non-epileptic seizures (NES), health outcomes and quality of life in young people with NES. Background: Multi-session psychoeducational groups for adults with NES have reported improved psychosocial functioning a...
Article
Background Tourette syndrome (TS) is reported in all cultures, although is speculated to be rare among those of Sub‐Saharan African descent. A lack of research exploring TS in the context of Sub‐Saharan Africa has meant that it is not yet established whether this apparent rarity is due to a true low prevalence or if identification of the condition...
Chapter
This chapter provides an introduction to the characteristics and parameters of specialist child neuropsychological assessments for clinical or research purposes. It discusses measurement issues, the main neuropsychological domains requiring specialized assessment, some relevant standardized assessments appropriate to these domains, alongside a cons...
Article
The field of Paediatric Neuropsychology has grown in recent years and specialisation now requires post-doctoral training and specialist clinical supervision. This chapter outlines key areas of measurement and highlights important considerations when interpreting neuropsychological data. For both children with and without identified brain related pr...
Article
Pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) is the most common and least satisfactory of the PDD diagnoses. It is not formally operationalized, which limits its reliability and has hampered attempts to assess its validity. We aimed, first, to improve the reliability and replicability of PDD-NOS by operationalizing its DSM-IV-...
Article
Full-text available
Parent and teacher data, from questionnaire surveys, suggest that school-identified disruptive children often have pragmatic language deficits of an autistic type. This replication study aimed to confirm earlier findings, using individual clinical assessment to investigate traits of autism-spectrum disorder in disruptive children. Persistently disr...
Article
The study examined a UK sample of 57 young people with Tourette syndrome (TS). The purpose of this study was to consider the impact of TS on young people's Quality of Life (QoL). The study used a mixed methods design, combining focus groups and questionnaire data. Child report questionnaires measured QoL and TS symptom severity. The results showed...
Article
Repetitive and ritualistic behaviours (RRBs) are a feature of both typical and atypical development. While the cognitive correlates of these behaviours have been investigated in some neurodevelopmental conditions these links remain largely unexplored in typical development. The current study examined the relationship between RRBs and executive func...
Article
This paper provides an introduction to specialist developmental neuropsychological assessment for clinical or research purposes. In particular, the review considers how to identify groups likely to require specialist neuropsychological testing. Furthermore, it discusses measurement issues, such as the non-specific abilities that are utilized in the...
Article
Specialized neuropsychological assessments of children and adolescents are required when a group or an individual has uneven IQ profiles or when a child has an attainment level significantly below the predicted level given their measured IQ. This article outlines important measurement considerations such as developmental factors and non-specific ab...
Conference Paper
Background: Recent evidence suggests that domains of autistic impairment often occur independently, in the absence of other elements of the syndrome. This raises the possibility that autism is a disorder of multiple underlying impairments, not explicable by one underlying abnormality. Particular impairments may be associated with specific behaviour...
Chapter
Psychosocial consequences of short stature 396 Hypopituitarism 397 Turner syndrome 397 Normal short stature 398 Discussion 400 Psychosocial causes of short stature 401 References 402 To a substantial extent our physical appearance shapes our social interactions, in adulthood and especially in childhood. We can probably recognize from our own experi...
Article
Background: Increasing numbers of children are referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services because of disruptive behaviour. Recent reviews on the origins of conduct problems indicate that the most severe and persistent forms are found predominantly among males with a range of neurodevelopmental vulnerabilities, which are likely to have...
Article
The clinical features of hyperphagic short stature (HSS) include short stature secondary to growth hormone insufficiency, excessive appetite (hyperphagia) and mild learning disabilities. Affected children characteristically live in conditions of high psychosocial stress. Symptoms resolve when the child is removed from the stressful environment. Fam...
Article
Recently a type of growth failure (Hyperphagic Short Stature) has been described, in which there is potentially reversible severe impairment of growth hormone secretion, in association with excessively high levels of psychosocial stress. This condition is a variant of the disorder formerly known as Psychosocial Dwarfism. In the present study we com...
Article
The psychosocial adaptation of children with normal short stature is a matter of concern to their parents, paediatricians and teachers. Potential areas of dysfunction include cognition, social behaviour, emotional adjustment and self-concept. We have studied a sample of 22 children who were referred to specialists for investigation of short stature...
Article
Growth failure without organic aetiology but associated with behavioural disturbance and psychosocial stress has been termed psychosocial short stature. This condition is not a valid diagnostic entity, but encompasses failure to thrive, stunting secondary to chronic malnutrition, and idiopathic hypopituitarism. Some children show spontaneous catch-...
Article
Full-text available
Short children are often described as having psychosocial problems. These reports may be inaccurate as former studies have relied largely on parental report. Psychosocial functioning of short children was assessed with the aim of using them and their peers as informants. Twenty two short (mean (SD) height -2.53 (0.28) SD score) prepubertal children...
Article
Previous studies that have examined the psychosocial adjustment of children with short stature have often been flawed, for two main reasons: first, a lack of sample homogeneity and, secondly, the measures of adjustment used have been limited in terms of their sensitivity. This paper examines psychological functioning in the following four broad are...

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