Jana Wold

Jana Wold
University of Canterbury | UC · School of Biological Sciences

PhD Student

About

14
Publications
3,120
Reads
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22
Citations
Education
February 2018 - February 2022
University of Canterbury
Field of study
  • Biology
July 2015 - June 2017
Victoria University of Wellington
Field of study
  • Ecology and Biodiversity
August 2008 - May 2012
University of North Texas
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (14)
Technical Report
Full-text available
The field of conservation biology has a long history of incorporating diverse disciplines into its ‘toolbox’ for improved outcomes. One such discipline is conservation genomics, which has experienced fast-paced growth and development over the last decade and offers exciting opportunities to help achieve the vision outlined in Aotearoa New Zealand’s...
Article
Full-text available
Species recovery programs are increasingly using genomic data to measure neutral genetic diversity and calculate metrics like relatedness. While these measures can inform conservation management, determining the mechanisms underlying inbreeding depression requires information about functional genes associated with adaptive or maladaptive traits. To...
Preprint
Over the past 50 years conservation genetics has developed a substantive toolbox to inform species management. One of the most long-standing tools available to manage genetics - the pedigree - has been widely used to characterize diversity and maximize evolutionary potential in threatened populations. Now, with the ability to use high throughput se...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 50 years conservation genetics has developed a substantive toolbox to inform species management. One of the most long‐standing tools available to manage genetics ‐ the pedigree ‐ has been widely used to characterize diversity and maximize evolutionary potential in threatened populations. Now, with the ability to use high throughput se...
Article
Full-text available
Structural variants (SVs) are large rearrangements (> 50 bp) within the genome that impact gene function and the content and structure of chromosomes. As a result, SVs are a significant source of functional genomic variation, i.e. variation at genomic regions underpinning phenotype differences, that can have large effects on individual and populati...
Preprint
Over the past 50 years conservation genetics has developed a substantive toolbox to inform species management. One of the most long-standing tools available to manage genetics-the pedigree-has been widely used to characterize diversity and maximize evolutionary potential in threatened populations. Now, with the ability to use high throughput sequen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Structural variants (SVs) are large rearrangements (> 50 bp) within the genome that impact the form and structure of chromosomes. As a result, SVs are a significant source of functional genomic diversity, i.e. variation at genomic regions underpinning phenotype differences, that can have large effects on individual and population fitness. While the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Structural variants (SVs) are large rearrangements (> 50 bp) within the genome that impact the form and structure of chromosomes. As a result, SVs are a significant source of functional genomic diversity, i.e. variation at genomic regions underpinning phenotype differences, that can have large effects on individual and population fitness. While the...
Preprint
1. To achieve the vision outlined in the national strategy for biodiversity, Te Mana o te Taiao, we will need to unite diverse disciplines, including conservation genetics/genomics. 2. As conservation genetic/genomic data generated for—and associated with—taonga (treasured) species is also taonga, we highlight the need for collaborative research p...
Article
The Buller’s albatross species complex is composed of two asynchronously breeding subspecies, the Northern Buller’s albatross (Thalassarche bulleri platei) and Southern Buller’s albatross (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri). The aim of this study was to test for genetic differentiation between Northern and Southern Buller’s albatross and to reassess gen...
Preprint
Full-text available
Increased capability in the conservation genomics community, combined with decreased sequencing costs, is providing new opportunities for the application of whole-genome sequence data to enhance species recovery. Indeed, assessments of genome-wide diversity based on SNP data are already informing the conservation management of threatened species ar...
Preprint
Increased capability in the conservation genomics community, combined with decreased sequencing costs, is providing new opportunities for the application of whole-genome sequence data to enhance species recovery. Indeed, assessments of genome-wide diversity based on SNP data are already informing the conservation management of threatened species ar...
Poster
Full-text available
Reduced reproductive fitness due to maladaptive traits, like reduced fertility, hampers recovery efforts for critically endangered species. To identify putative structural variants on the Z-chromosome, we are developing a workflow to generate high resolution long-read sequence data for kākāpō (Strigops habroptilus) with known reproductive success...
Article
Full-text available
Between 2002 and 2011, Buller's albatrosses (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri and T. b. platei) accounted for 34% of albatross interactions in New Zealand trawl fisheries. However, the relative impact of commercial fisheries on each taxon is uncertain as identifying individuals by morphology is challenging. The aim of this research was to develop a gen...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I have 2 populations which do not share haplotypes, and are quite diverse within the populations. Haplotype diversity is similar in both groups (.982 &.963). As a result, an AMOVA calculated with haplotype frequency failed to differentiate among groups. And a pairwise FST (again, with haplotype frequency) demonstrated very little differentiation between the two (0.028, p < 0.0001).
I cannot find information regarding when it is appropriate to incorporate distance into an AMOVA. From what I understand, the concern is that the differentiation between two groups may be inflated by few, distantly related, haplotypes.
Can someone direct me to some relevant resources so I may resolve this?
Cheers!

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